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zandru

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  1. I got this impression, too. After all, weren't ALL the tavern wenches and 'hos "in love" with Robert? At least, as far as he could tell. Not for Robert to consider that maybe it was his status as a Great Lord and then also a Great Warrior in The Rebellion and later a Great King that the ladies were attracted to. And why shouldn't they still be attracted to him, after he'd gained 100 pounds of fat, was constantly drunk and pulled into his bed anything that wore skirts? Women couldn't possibly care about such things! All the women and ladies loved Robert! So Lyanna did, too. Amirite? Of course, Lyanna Stark was to be a Great Lady, the Lady of Winterfell, since she was the eldest and only daughter of Lord Stark. She was on a level with the Lord of Storm's End, not someone hoping to cling to him to improve her status. But this may have been too difficult a calculation for Robert Baratheon. And after her elopement/abduction, Robert had him a Grievance that he had to nurse. In a twisted sense, it made him happy.
  2. Heh, heh, heh. You might be nearly as old as me... That said, I'd heard about George RR's series for years, and marvelled at the suddenly vastly increased attendance at the local sf con by - imagine it! - young people. I'd been watching the "usual suspects" continue to get greyer and (ahem) more weighty over the years, not to mention turning up in the "In Memorium" section of the progrem. But now, one could no longer get into George's readings unless one waited in line for hours. And their fantastic costumes! (Which, believe me, look better on the young and fit...) The teevie show had gotten underway and had obviously created lots of new fans. Clearly, something was going on. Finally, one day, while searching for a lightweight paperback book to give to a friend who was traveling to Iceland (Journey to the Centre of the Earth, of course), I picked up a used copy of Game of Thrones for myself, even though I'm not a fan of fantasy. And could not put it down.
  3. Exactly. Sansa could have done like Cersei, and wear her bruises as "badges of honor", but instead, she concealed them with makeup and overly concealing clothing. Had Sansa quietly made it clear what "King" Joffrey was doing to her, she'd have had some friends in court and among the servants - and Joffrey would have had fewer. By being "the good girl", she saved herself zero beatings, as far as we can tell, and gained much additional humiliation. Sure, Arya in contrast was fully capable of keeping quiet and following orders, but she remained rebellious, keeping in touch with her friends, learning the names and habits of others, practicing her water dancing whenever she could. This despite performing exhausting physical labor all day. In spite of this, Arya was always waiting for means and opportunities to escape. Let's add that, even though Arya knew she would do better on her own because of her skills in riding, woodsmanship, and swordplay, she made a point of bringing along both of her surviving "brothers." Like Dr. Manhattan, Sansa could have done so much more.
  4. I don't see how Bran will end up as a sword-slinging foot soldier. Not with the training he's getting from the 3eyed Crow. Bran's capabilities and developing powers will be used in more powerful and subtle ways, such as gathering intelligence from the present and past, influencing birds and animals, and as we've seen with Theon, communicating with key people at pivotal moments. Putting Bran into the fray, even as Hodor, would foolishly risk Hodor's life while wasting Bran's potential. Also, willfully preempting Hodor's autonomy and identity is a great wrong. Sadly, Bran is doing it more and more, in spite of knowing how much it terrifies and hurts Hodor. But Bran's "active role" won't be as a sword waving grunt. Bloodraven won't be teaching him advanced swordsmanship; like I said, he's got a different curriculum.
  5. Well, George RR is saying it's going to be long, REALLY long. On the other hand, if his publishers then tell him a book that size can't be bound, we may get two! (But breaking it up will take an extra 5 years.)
  6. Good question! I always ordered the latest Harry Potter months before its release, and got it delivered on release day. Of course, I was a little old for HP PJ release parties... However, as much as Winds has been anticipated, if the virus allows I imagine some bookstores will consider reviving the practice!
  7. You probably eat one chocolate per day when you get a whole boxful, right? I'm with those who will read it straight through, in stretches as long as I have time for, and after I've finished, give it another read to make sure I've put the pieces together right. Several years back (sob!) I wrote down a page or so of questions and cliffhangers that Dance w/Dragons left me with. It might be smart for me to look over those before digging in.
  8. Not to change the subject, but this was Albus Dumbledore's point to Harry Potter. There were thousands of various prophesies, largely unheard. But when a character hears a prophesy and takes it for a valid prediction, and works to either make it true or prevent it from happening, then the words start to have major significance on events ... and the results are typically bad. Cersei is one example. Tom Riddle is another. Macbeth's wife, and by extension, Macbeth are classic examples. I think Rheagar will be another, as we learn his story in the fullness of time. A few of the Ice & Fire characters seem able to hear prophesies and not feel compelled to act on them. Arya, for one. She's hard headed and firmly grounded in the world. Daenerys, I think, also. She does brood over the words from the House of the Undying, of Qaith's many messages - but she doesn't take actions on this basis. This doesn't address who the younger and more beautiful queen will be, I know. It's a digression.
  9. (duh!) Thanks. I should have known that.
  10. If so, I don't see how the valonquar's "hands on her white throat" is going to work out.
  11. I beg to differ. What about the many hundreds who earlier "migrated" in the holds of the slaver ships at Hardhome? Also, I doubt Gilly would want to make her home in Essos. The societies there, outside of Braavos, are built on slavery, blood "sport", out of control dog consumption, and severe social stratification beyond the slavery. As one of the (relatively, under Craster) Free Folk, this would be even more abhorrent to Gilly. If she and Dany were to meet, Gilly would be a strong voice encouraging Daenerys to leave Essos for her Westerosi home, ASAP.
  12. The timing would have been excellent, for me at least! I'd just lost my affection for Tyrion by then. It would have been too bad for poor Penny, of course, and that would leave lovelorn, depressed Jorah on his own. However, Daenerys might have been spared the potentially self-serving, sabotaging advice that the embittered Tyrion might give her.
  13. Eddard Stark not taking advantage of Bran's fall and long coma to tell King Robert, no, I can't go to King's Landing at this time to serve as your Hand. My family needs me. That would pretty much cut out the King's Landing plotline and move along the war against the Lannisters (Ned foresaw it) and response to the crisis at the Wall.
  14. Good one! Also, that Lady Catelyn had not trusted a man who had been beaten within an inch of his life, shamed, and sent hom in disgrace over her ... with little sympathy from her at the time. Later, when Tyrion told her how Baelish repeated over and over, all through King's Landing the story of how he'd taken Cat's maidenhead, both soiling her and cheating her Stark husband, that she'd had the wit to send a bird to Ned in King's Landing to warn him. I wish Arya had stuck with Sandor until the Elder Brother happened by. It might just have been a matter of hours or less than a day. She could have left, guiltless, knowing he'd be in good hands while she herself was now free.
  15. I'm pretty sure that Sansa has not yet heard about "Arya's" marriage. The Vale seems pretty secluded and insular, and Baelish probably has advised the maesters to do nothing to enlighten his "daughter" when news comes in from the outside world. Sansa might well get much of her news through Myranda Royce, who may not (or may) think that the doings in far-off "Winterfell" are of any interest to her new bastard friend. Those Northerners are such savages, don't ya know. In addition to seeing "Alayne's" reactions to learning "Arya" is now the Lady of Winterfell, I'm hoping she will also learn about how the Hound has gone outlaw and his many atrocities at Saltpans (etc.) What will she think about that? (Meanwhile, the actual identity of "the Hound" keeps changing ... latest we've seen, it's Lem.)
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