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Zumbs

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  1. Good finds :-) Didn't she scold Jorah with Illyrios words in the second season, though? Implying that she had grown beyond it? Naturally, as you note, the experience of liberating Meeren could have gotten her hopes up. And even though she did save Westeros, it quickly became abundantly clear that no one was going to cheer her. Still, burning an entire city to the ground because its people aren't cheering the conquering army is crazy in a way that I don't find to be consistent with her character as we have seen it develop.
  2. From a character arc point-of-view it could have made sense, if Kings Landing wasn't surrendering to her. If the civilians had been attacking her forces or Cersei had used the bells as a part of a wild-fire trap against Daenerys' armies or something like that. But she was winning. For once, her advisors had actually made a successful plan. The Iron Throne was within her grasp.
  3. I had expected Jamie to reach Cersei before the battle, describing Tyrions plan. Then Cersei (being Cersei) would have made a plan along the lines of feigning surrender, but mining the area around the gates with wild fire, causing a significant destruction of Daenerys' army, followed by an attack by the Lannister army and the Golden Company, who had been hiding in civilian clothes. That would also give Daenerys a reason to snap that would be somewhat relatable and fit with her personality and story arc. As it stands, she comes across as a cruel madwoman that needs to be put down. Which is likely to happen in the next episode. On a side note: Who ordered the bells? Jamie never made it to Cersei, and I did not see Cersei ordering the surrender.
  4. Jon was the one who made it possible, so it may very well have been the role, he was brought back to play.
  5. I'm more annoyed that we have had this brooding, silent enemy that at no point has given any indication of having an agency other than "kill all humans". Yes, there has been indications that he was wronged, but there is a lot of ground from "getting revenge" to "kill all humans".
  6. In many ways this is the next step in Jons arc: Going from a do'er to a ruler. If he had been Neds bastard son, he would have completed his heroic epic by becoming King in the North, but as the son of Rhaegar, he must go South and take the Iron Throne. Even though he as pledged himself to his aunt, who is also his lover, and who also needs to go South and take the Iron Throne to complete her heroic epic.
  7. I assumed that Daenerys based her belief on being barren on not having a period anymore rather than the word of Mirri Maz Duur. It seems that her monthly period wasn't a dead giveaway for Daenerys. Maybe her education just wasn't that big on the facts of life?
  8. Ah, ok, I think that I misunderstood your earlier post as Cersei would go for the Starks first. Your logic is sound, and, sadly, I'm afraid you are right. Jon seems incapable of considering other threats than the white walkers.
  9. If the series so far has shown us anything about how Cersei thinks, it is that she is extremely ruthless and very good at making plans that get her out ahead in the short term. However, she fails to consider her plan beyond her immediate objective, often causing her to land in bigger problems than before. So, yeah, even if she did see the white walkers as a huge problem (she does not even accept that they exist), she would still be likely to try to crush Jon and the North while he was fighting the white walkers. I viewed that scene slightly differently. That Jaime and Cersei (correctly IMO) ended up deciding that food triumps all else, so Highgarden would be their first objective. Jon could also hedge his bet by sending a small army, a maybe few hundred men, to Moat Cailing to hold the Neck. This would not protect him from the Iron Fleet (but he does not know about that yet), but it would make it extremely hard to march a Lannister army North. In Jons shoes, however, I would be a lot more troubled by Littlefinger. He is in Winterfell, commanding the army of the Vale. While Littlefinger may actually have told the truth regarding his infatuation with Sansa, Littlefinger has no commitment at all to Jon. In fact, Jon could be a rival for his goal of the Iron throne. So, I could full well see Littlefinger working with Cersei to crush Jon from the inside.
  10. To some extent, it would depend on the actual time scale involved. From Euron started building to getting to Kings landing, the other fleet sailed to Slavers Bay, parlayed with Daenerys, waited for Daenerys to finish her tasks at Slavers Bay, load the troops and sail to Dragonstone. This could easy be a period of months. Still, 1000 warships in a 2-3 months? Sounds very fast. Maybe they commandeered some of the ships on the way? Assuming that the R+L=J theory is correct, Jon would still be half Stark. Same as he would be if he had been the son of Ned Stark.
  11. I have been pondering that as well. Maybe they have some unresolved tension from the time where he was a bastard and she was a highborn lady? I am also somewhat baffled that Jon does not take the opportunity to have breakfest meetings with her before the court meetings to discuss politics and strategy. After all, Jon knows about the Wall and the white walkers, while Sansa knows about politics and the threat from the South. In many ways they ought to complement each other quite well ... except they don't ... I would tend to agree that both were reasonable paths to take. While not said, both the Karstarks and the Umbers bled and died for Robb. Alternatives could have been to marry Alys off to, say, a wildling chief? Or to send the boy to another ally as a ward, e.g. like Theon.
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