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Nadden

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  1. Here’s some foreshadowing you might appreciate: Here, the word-smith, Martin forging at his iron-desk with a quill and inkwell as his hammer and forge; after dipping his quill, is cleverly placing the “shadow” into the foreground “in front of Royce.” alerting readers that something will be happening alluding to future plot. This is the artistry of Martin’s style. A shadow in the foreground, foreshadow. Paying close attention to the rest of the passage we see a description of the “shadow” … Ideas about this foreshadowing:)??
  2. Here’s some foreshadowing you might appreciate: “A shadow emerged from the dark of the wood. It stood in front of Royce. Tall, it was, and gaunt and hard as old bones, with flesh pale as milk.” (Prologue, AGOT) Here, the word-smith, Martin forging at his iron-desk with a quill and inkwell as his hammer and forge; after dipping his quill, is cleverly placing the “shadow” into the foreground “in front of Royce.” alerting readers that something will be happening alluding to future plot. This is the artistry of Martin’s style. A shadow in the foreground, foreshadow. Paying close attention to the rest of the passage we see a description of the “shadow” … Ideas about this foreshadowing:)??
  3. Something to note: Will immediately pulled his garron over after hearing the wolf’s howl. Here it is: “Somewhere off in the wood a wolf howled. Will pulled his garron over beneath an ancient gnarled ironwood and dismounted.” And consider the symbolic imagery created by Martin with the “great rock” in the AGOT Prologue. Here are the quotes: “They put up a lean-to against the rock.” “Moonlight shone down on the clearing, the ashes of the firepit, the snow-covered lean-to, the great rock, the little half-frozen stream.” Compare and contrast that image with this from Bran 1, AGOT: “Half-buried in bloodstained snow, a huge dark shape slumped in death.” ”Bran’s heart was thumping in his chest as he pushed through a waist-high drift to his brothers’ side.” Analysis: A huge/great dark shape half snow-covered (snow drift) like a lean-to against a rock. Not moving and “hard beside a stream”, Will said. Like a frozen dead direwolf by a river. Gared himself is not a bad metaphor for the Mother direwolf when you consider 2 ears, 3 toes, and the little finger from his left hand. From the Mother direwolf, she lost 2 female pups, 3 male pups, and a little runt. Gared, with ragged furs, like the Mother direwolf died from a throat wound. I believe that the Mother direwolf was needex to get “Ghost” south of the Wall. To get a Norhtuos Southron. And like Gared said, they “could be a fortnight getting back” or a nightfort getting back. The answers to the question lay somewhere in the symbolism, metaphors, and word play.
  4. Southron an inverted parallel of Northous
  5. A preview, Robb swore, “The Others take his eyes.” Robb says this in reference to Gared. Compare this to the mother direwolf who is having her eyes eaten out by the maggots at the end of the same chapter.
  6. People read the mother direwolf scene and sometimes catch the somewhat obvious symbolism of the dead mother direwolf and the stag. I postulate there is soooooo much more. This post explores a small detail, the little maggots, from the mother direwolf scene. By bringing light to the smallest of details we may bring some understanding to the painstaking effort Martin makes to bring his books to their conclusion. As another says, when the singer has no books, no ink, no parchment, no more writing; he’ll instead have the trees, and the weirwoods above all. And when he dies, he’ll go into the wood, into leaf and limb and root, and the trees remember. All the songs, the histories and prayers, everything they knew about the world. For time is different for a tree than for a man. Sun and soil and water, these are the things a weirwood understands, not days and years and centuries. For men, time is a river. We are trapped in its flow, hurtling from past to present, always in the same direction. The lives of trees are different. They root and grow and die in one place, and that river does not move them. A thousand human years are a moment to a weirwood, and through such gates you and I may gaze into the past. The books will come. The mother direwolf scene, the first scene that Martin is said to have sung or written, is loaded with symbolism… Here, we will focus on the smallest single bit of detail to make a point. But first… We must understand Martin’s use of parallel structure, the repetition of the same ideas, pattern of words or phrases within a sentence or passage. Here they will reveal hidden details about both passages and turn the rereads into a literary treasure hunt. George R.R. Martin’s use of parallel structure, besides helping to maintain continuity, gives his writing a rhythm and enables him to organize his thoughts and ideas. Additionally, GRRM’s keen awareness of rhythm, I believe, could partly explain his title of the series, “A Song of Ice and Fire”, with rhythm being an important element of song. Starting, I’d like to state that our understanding of parallel structure will be important while analyzing the following quotes. To begin, do you remember reading this line when Bran looks at the dead mother direwolf, “Bran glimpsed blind eyes crawling with maggots,”? (Bran 1, AGOT). Compare that line with, “Will saw movement from the corner of his eye. Pale shapes gliding through the wood. He turned his head, glimpsed a white shadow in the darkness.” (Prologue, AGOT). Analyzing these lines, noting the word “glimpsed”, we find similar ideas. GRRM’s use of the verb “glimpsed” in both quotes helps us to discover and connect these parallel ideas, actions, and scenes. I’ll show you;) The characters in each quote “glimpsed” small white or “pale” somethings “crawling” or “gliding” through “blind eyes” or “the wood” and “darkness”. Our first parallel here is easy to identify. The small white and “pale” somethings can conceptually be similar in size. We simply have to understand the visual context of both scenes from the POV(Point Of View) of our two characters. In AGOT prologue our POV character, Will, has been commanded “Up the tree.” and to “Be quick about it.” to “Look for a fire.” So we find him high up a in the sentinel tree. From that vantage point the “pale shape would seem smaller like the maggots they are symbolizing. By contrast, Bran, our second POV character “pushed through a waist-high drift to his brothers’ side.” where he “found Robb on the riverbank north of the bridge, with Jon still mounted beside him.” These two scenes ,though opposite in nature, illustrate the parallel structure we are trying to establish. Will is climbing up a tree away from our subjects and Bran is pushing toward our subjects getting closer. In this instance it’s inverted. But they are parallel none the less. Next consider the action of the two objects… When we consider the action in both quotes we notice that they are interchangeable. Check this it out. It’s easy for us, the reader, to infer the maggots as also “gliding”. Take a moment to consider it. Larvae, with no legs, on a smooth wet surface of an eye. This was actually my first hint that the maggots could be a metaphor for the “pale shapes”. However, the next action, “Crawling”, explains a point in both life cycles. Here the maggots are at the beginning stage of their life cycle, and, I believe, so to are our “pale shapes”. Life cycles in our story are never ending. I won’t go into it further but think reincarnation. Looking for other similarities we find, those maggots are, in fact described as, faceless, just like our “pale shapes” or “watchers”. Do you remember the watchers with no eyes. Here’s the quote, “Behind him, to right, to left, all around him, the watchers stood patient, faceless, silent,” Oh yeah, I’d say that the “pale shapes” and maggots could be comparatively both silent and patient also;) Their descriptions match well. Confession, we understand that the “pale shapes” look nothing like maggots; however, the words that Martin uses to describe them are are parallel and supports the idea of parallel structure here. Later, a further deeper analysis of the maggots life cycle will reveal much more and become an important topic in this continued post. But so far in our analysis both objects have the same imagery; And, the actions of the objects are interchangeable. Lastly, glimpsing “blind eyes” and glimpsing “in the darkness” are parallel concepts and need very little explanation. Close your eyes and pretend your blind if you don’t see the connection. Furthermore, while considering how the indirect object, “the wood”, compares with the “blind eyes” and the “darkness” I noticed something that I think you’ll find interesting. The word “wood” is not plural. Though, that’s not unique, I think it is intensional and has purpose. I admit, there are other cases when one describes the plural of something that they use its’ singular form. One example that comes to mind is deer. The word deer can either be used to describe a parcel of deer or a single stag. However, in one previous analysis’ of mine I’ve discovered that the sentinel tree is figuratively symbolizing the mother direwolf, a singular thing. To me, this is why Martin uses the singular form of the word “wood”. And what I mean by figuratively symbolizing is that the two seemingly unrelated objects in these two different scenes parallel each other and are metaphors for one another. Why is Martin creating figurative meaning? In these scenes, and in other parts of his writing, Martin is subverting the main narrative of the text in order to develop a figurative meaning for many objects and people. Have you noticed that the description of all the swords in AGOT prologue match the descriptions of those wielding them? Developing the figurative meaning in his work not only has he made his writing more interesting and enjoyable; but it’s a big part of our treasure hunt. Now, comparing “the wood” with the “blind eyes” and “the darkness”. Let’s understand clearly that the “white shadow” whom Will glimpses in the darkness is not one of the ”pale shapes” that are gliding threw “the wood”. I want only to concern ourselves with the “pale shapes”. It is “the wood” that is the metaphor of our mother direwolf. and not “the darkness”. “The darkness” seems to encapsulate our “white shadow”, who is in a duel with Waymar at the time our “pale shapes” are gliding. And we are not analyzing the duel. The focus here is on the maggots. So let’s look, maggots are blind parasites in the “blind eyes” of our sentinel being. I believe our “pale shapes” are also parasites in the “the wood”, or were(emphasis on “were”) parasites. However, we are still unsure what this moment is for our “pale shapes”. We’ll need to continue our investigation into the maggots. But let’s take another moment to summarize. The parallel imagery and concepts, along with the interchangeable actions are establishing our quotes as great parallels and allows us to draw additional conclusions. We are hoping that a deeper investigation into our maggots will reveal more information about our “pale shapes”. Additionally, the parallel structure of these two quotes helps to support a previous idea that the mother direwolf is symbolic of the sentinel tree. More on that in a bit. I want to finish establishing the two quotes as parallels. For now, a fun thought. The word “wood” may be a clever wordplay because of the two “o”’s looking like eyes in the word. Here they are “oo”. See it?:) Like “blind eyes” that can’t see. They are figuratively blind:) Get it!? And those “oo” creating the word and connecting the letter “W”, perhaps standing for the “white” or “pale shapes” scene and the “D” for the “direwolf” scene. White or pale shapes/ Direwolf. It’s debatable. You should know that GRRM often engages in this type of wordplay. But certainly that idea is up for debate. But take a look at this good example of another type of wordplay Martin uses. This one is undebatable. GRRM describes Waymar’s cloak, from the same prologue chapter saying it was “as soft as sin”. If we take “as sin” combine the words and write them backwards we get Nissa. Thus, the cloak can be seen as a symbol of Nissa Nissa. Cool right? The wordplay would complete my analysis of the two quotes. Thus, allowing me to conclude my argument. Which is, the two quotes are great parallels in spite of the example of wordplay given for the word “wood”. The maggots, that Bran sees, symbolically represent the “pale shapes”, Waymar’s new stabby friends, figuratively. It’s funny that Bran can’t see any of the symbolism. As per this quote, “A sudden silence descended over the party. The men looked at the antler uneasily, and no one dared to speak. Even Bran could sense their fear, though he did not understand.” To be continued…
  7. People read the mother direwolf scene and sometimes catch the somewhat obvious symbolism of the dead mother direwolf and the stag. I postulate there is soooooo much more. This post explores a small detail, the little maggots, from the mother direwolf scene. By bringing light to the smallest of details we may bring some understanding to the painstaking effort Martin makes to bring his books to their conclusion. As another says, when the singer has no books, no ink, no parchment, no more writing; he’ll instead have the trees, and the weirwoods above all. And when he dies, he’ll go into the wood, into leaf and limb and root, and the trees remember. All the songs, the histories and prayers, everything they knew about the world. For time is different for a tree than for a man. Sun and soil and water, these are the things a weirwood understands, not days and years and centuries. For men, time is a river. We are trapped in its flow, hurtling from past to present, always in the same direction. The lives of trees are different. They root and grow and die in one place, and that river does not move them. A thousand human years are a moment to a weirwood, and through such gates you and I may gaze into the past. The books will come. The mother direwolf scene, the first scene that Martin is said to have sung or written, is loaded with symbolism… Here, we will focus on the smallest single bit of detail to make a point. But first… We must understand Martin’s use of parallel structure, the repetition of the same ideas, pattern of words or phrases within a sentence or passage. Here they will reveal hidden details about both passages and turn the rereads into a literary treasure hunt. George R.R. Martin’s use of parallel structure, besides helping to maintain continuity, gives his writing a rhythm and enables him to organize his thoughts and ideas. Additionally, GRRM’s keen awareness of rhythm, I believe, could partly explain his title of the series, “A Song of Ice and Fire”, with rhythm being an important element of song. Starting, I’d like to state that our understanding of parallel structure will be important while analyzing the following quotes. To begin, do you remember reading this line when Bran looks at the dead mother direwolf, “Bran glimpsed blind eyes crawling with maggots,”? (Bran 1, AGOT). Compare that line with, “Will saw movement from the corner of his eye. Pale shapes gliding through the wood. He turned his head, glimpsed a white shadow in the darkness.” (Prologue, AGOT). Analyzing these lines, noting the word “glimpsed”, we find similar ideas. GRRM’s use of the verb “glimpsed” in both quotes helps us to discover and connect these parallel ideas, actions, and scenes. I’ll show you;) The characters in each quote “glimpsed” small white or “pale” somethings “crawling” or “gliding” through “blind eyes” or “the wood” and “darkness”. Our first parallel here is easy to identify. The small white and “pale” somethings can conceptually be similar in size. We simply have to understand the visual context of both scenes from the POV(Point Of View) of our two characters. In AGOT prologue our POV character, Will, has been commanded “Up the tree.” and to “Be quick about it.” to “Look for a fire.” So we find him high up a in the sentinel tree. From that vantage point the “pale shape would seem smaller like the maggots they are symbolizing. By contrast, Bran, our second POV character “pushed through a waist-high drift to his brothers’ side.” where he “found Robb on the riverbank north of the bridge, with Jon still mounted beside him.” These two scenes ,though opposite in nature, illustrate the parallel structure we are trying to establish. Will is climbing up a tree away from our subjects and Bran is pushing toward our subjects getting closer. In this instance it’s inverted. But they are parallel none the less. Next consider the action of the two objects… When we consider the action in both quotes we notice that they are interchangeable. Check this it out. It’s easy for us, the reader, to infer the maggots as also “gliding”. Take a moment to consider it. Larvae, with no legs, on a smooth wet surface of an eye. This was actually my first hint that the maggots could be a metaphor for the “pale shapes”. However, the next action, “Crawling”, explains a point in both life cycles. Here the maggots are at the beginning stage of their life cycle, and, I believe, so to are our “pale shapes”. Life cycles in our story are never ending. I won’t go into it further but think reincarnation. Looking for other similarities we find, those maggots are, in fact described as, faceless, just like our “pale shapes” or “watchers”. Do you remember the watchers with no eyes. Here’s the quote, “Behind him, to right, to left, all around him, the watchers stood patient, faceless, silent,” Oh yeah, I’d say that the “pale shapes” and maggots could be comparatively both silent and patient also;) Their descriptions match well. Confession, we understand that the “pale shapes” look nothing like maggots; however, the words that Martin uses to describe them are are parallel and supports the idea of parallel structure here. Later, a further deeper analysis of the maggots life cycle will reveal much more and become an important topic in this continued post. But so far in our analysis both objects have the same imagery; And, the actions of the objects are interchangeable. Lastly, glimpsing “blind eyes” and glimpsing “in the darkness” are parallel concepts and need very little explanation. Close your eyes and pretend your blind if you don’t see the connection. Furthermore, while considering how the indirect object, “the wood”, compares with the “blind eyes” and the “darkness” I noticed something that I think you’ll find interesting. The word “wood” is not plural. Though, that’s not unique, I think it is intensional and has purpose. I admit, there are other cases when one describes the plural of something that they use its’ singular form. One example that comes to mind is deer. The word deer can either be used to describe a parcel of deer or a single stag. However, in one previous analysis’ of mine I’ve discovered that the sentinel tree is figuratively symbolizing the mother direwolf, a singular thing. To me, this is why Martin uses the singular form of the word “wood”. And what I mean by figuratively symbolizing is that the two seemingly unrelated objects in these two different scenes parallel each other and are metaphors for one another. Why is Martin creating figurative meaning? In these scenes, and in other parts of his writing, Martin is subverting the main narrative of the text in order to develop a figurative meaning for many objects and people. Have you noticed that the description of all the swords in AGOT prologue match the descriptions of those wielding them? Developing the figurative meaning in his work not only has he made his writing more interesting and enjoyable; but it’s a big part of our treasure hunt. Now, comparing “the wood” with the “blind eyes” and “the darkness”. Let’s understand clearly that the “white shadow” whom Will glimpses in the darkness is not one of the ”pale shapes” that are gliding threw “the wood”. I want only to concern ourselves with the “pale shapes”. It is “the wood” that is the metaphor of our mother direwolf. and not “the darkness”. “The darkness” seems to encapsulate our “white shadow”, who is in a duel with Waymar at the time our “pale shapes” are gliding. And we are not analyzing the duel. The focus here is on the maggots. So let’s look, maggots are blind parasites in the “blind eyes” of our sentinel being. I believe our “pale shapes” are also parasites in the “the wood”, or were(emphasis on “were”) parasites. However, we are still unsure what this moment is for our “pale shapes”. We’ll need to continue our investigation into the maggots. But let’s take another moment to summarize. The parallel imagery and concepts, along with the interchangeable actions are establishing our quotes as great parallels and allows us to draw additional conclusions. We are hoping that a deeper investigation into our maggots will reveal more information about our “pale shapes”. Additionally, the parallel structure of these two quotes helps to support a previous idea that the mother direwolf is symbolic of the sentinel tree. More on that in a bit. I want to finish establishing the two quotes as parallels. For now, a fun thought. The word “wood” may be a clever wordplay because of the two “o”’s looking like eyes in the word. Here they are “oo”. See it?:) Like “blind eyes” that can’t see. They are figuratively blind:) Get it!? And those “oo” creating the word and connecting the letter “W”, perhaps standing for the “white” or “pale shapes” scene and the “D” for the “direwolf” scene. White or pale shapes/ Direwolf. It’s debatable. You should know that GRRM often engages in this type of wordplay. But certainly that idea is up for debate. But take a look at this good example of another type of wordplay Martin uses. This one is undebatable. GRRM describes Waymar’s cloak, from the same prologue chapter saying it was “as soft as sin”. If we take “as sin” combine the words and write them backwards we get Nissa. Thus, the cloak can be seen as a symbol of Nissa Nissa. Cool right? The wordplay would complete my analysis of the two quotes. Thus, allowing me to conclude my argument. Which is, the two quotes are great parallels in spite of the example of wordplay given for the word “wood”. The maggots, that Bran sees, symbolically represent the “pale shapes”, Waymar’s new stabby friends, figuratively. It’s funny that Bran can’t see any of the symbolism. As per this quote, “A sudden silence descended over the party. The men looked at the antler uneasily, and no one dared to speak. Even Bran could sense their fear, though he did not understand.” To be continued…
  8. Here’s a good lightning theory I don’t think anybody has posted about. It most likely the first lightning strike in the series. And we don’t even see it:) The Ironwood tree in the prologue (AGOT) was struck by lightning. That’s why Gared seemed shell shocked before his beheading (Bran 1). The ironwood tree in the prologue where Gared was guarding the horses is symbolically linked with Waymar’s sword. I’ll have to ask you to please except that as a premise in order to avoid a lengthy discussion about literary devices used to create figurative meaning in order to arrive at the symbolism that I’m pointing out. If you’ll simply except the premise than we can easily stay on topic and that would take less time:) So staying on topic, the sword shatters when struck by a sword that “danced with pale blue light.” “Pale blue light” is a nice description of lightning wouldn’t you say. Then after the sword duel Will found the broken hilt. “He found what was left of the sword a few feet away, the end splintered and twisted like a tree struck by lightning.” The word “like” in this sentence makes this a simile. The simile draws a direct comparison of the broken sword to a tree struck by lightning. Thus, allowing us to subvert the literal meaning in the narrative and consider the figurative meaning. That tree being struck down was foreshadowed by the stumps on the side of Gared’s head where his ears used to be. “Stumps” being the operative word. The two trees in the prologue(AGOT), the sentinel and the Ironwood, will both be destroyed according to Gared’s head:) “the scars around his ear holes flushed red with anger where Maester Aemon had cut the ears away.” Did Maester Aemon conspire against the old Gods or just help to fulfill prophecy? So those “ear holes flushed red” against the Ironwood stump that would be covered in Gared’s blood is very ironic, right? “His father took off the man’s head with a single sure stroke; “iron certainty”, just like Gared said about “the cold”. And so Gared was talking about the cold and his head was cut off by “Ice”. Next, “Blood sprayed out across the snow, as red as summerwine. One of the horses reared and had to be restrained to keep from bolting.” That horse trying to bolt is another hint. That horse, near the ironwood stump, parallels the garrons belonging to Will and Gared in the prologue. “Bolt”, some lightning language, is a word specifically chosen by our author. Next, a description of the stump. “They forced his head down onto the hard black wood.” “Black” wood, as if struck by lightning:) that would burn and char the wood. That “ironwood” is now an iron anvil (kind of). But what happened to the rest of the tree after it was struck by lightning? Here are these quotes: “Race you to the bridge?” (Robb challenged Jon) “They found Robb on the riverbank north of the bridge, with Jon still mounted beside him.” (Bran and Ned caught up to Robb and Jon) “his father made them dismount beside the bridge and approach on foot.” “Bran could hear the wind in the trees, the clatter of their hooves on the ironwood planks,” Ironwood planks!!!? So the bridge near the dead direwolf mother is made of ironwood!! I’m guessing that the lightning in the prologue is figurative for an axe that cut the ironwood down in the Bran 1. Back to the ironwood stump. The Destrier that was tied to the ironwood away from the smaller garrons by Waymar shows up again in ASOS ASOS “Sam felt a moment’s relief, until he saw the horse. Hoarfrost covered it like a sheen of frozen sweat, and a nest of stiff black entrails dragged from its open belly. On its back was a rider pale as ice.” I believe this is the dead horse from the prologue(AGOT). And was brought back like Waymar. However, it now came back with those “entrails”. Now, some more figurative imagery, picture the image of the black Destrier with it’s head down and entrails hanging down. Kind of looks like an ironwood stump if you could see the roots. Don’t you agree? In fact, this scene is a nice parallel to the first scene in the next chapter. Desmond and Tomard(Fat Tom) the guardsmen guarding Gared are an inverse parallel to Gared guarding the garrons. This makes the destrier as nice parallel to our ironwood stump. So does this make the “white shadow” that Will glimpsed symbolic of the lightning or the sword “Ice”? Both!!? Considering, the “white shadow” will be riding the reanimated destrier and that “Ice” will be delivering justice (Just Ice) to Gared. Thoughts??
  9. Waymar Royce is trying to fulfill prophecy. As the “youngest son of an ancient house” or prince who has recently become a “Sworn Brother of the Night’s Watch” or might we say sworn prince or promised prince. Waymar is forged 3x in his duel with the Other. Here’s the textual support showing the forging along with the quote from the prophecy: 1st Forging for AA: “Azor Ahai needed to forge a hero's sword, so he labored for thirty days and thirty nights at the sacred fires of a temple until it was done. However, when he went to temper it in water, the sword broke.” 1st forging for Waymar: Once Will saw “A shadow emerged from the dark of the wood.”, he then “heard the breath go out of Ser Waymar Royce in a long hiss.” Like tempering a sword in water. Then, “His voice cracked like a boy’s”. 2nd Forging for AA: “He was not one to give up easily, so he started over. Azor Ahai took fifty days and fifty nights to make another sword better than the first. To temper it this time, he captured a lion and drove the sword into its heart, but once more the steel shattered.” After the first forging Will sees “a longsword like none that he had ever seen”. “And somehow Will knew it was sharper than any razor.” NOTE HERE: the last 4 letters of the quote. A Z O R. This blade was going to beat Waymar’s blade according to that sentence:) Note also that there’s a premise to this short essay ( not written here)successfully argues that the swords here in the prologue are figuratively symbolic of the person wielding their swords. (That’s in another essay) The point I am making is the sword belonging to the Other will not just shatter Waymar’s sword but figuratively Waymar also. 2nd forging for Waymar: In the next paragraph after the Other’s sword paragraph, “Ser Waymar met him bravely.” Perhaps showing the courage of a lion. Then, “When the blades met, there was no ring of metal on metal; only a high, thin sound at the edge of hearing, like an animal screaming in pain.” A lion? Perhaps. “Then Royce’s parry came a beat too late. The pale sword bit through the ringmail beneath his arm.” Beneath his arm(?), same area as his heart. “a beat too late”, heartbeat reference?? Maybe. “Then, Ser Waymar Royce found his fury…and he came up snarling,” Sounds like a lion. Then Waymar’s blade shatters. Here, one could argue that it’s Waymar being portrayed as the beast. However, it was the Others’ sword that “bit” Waymar. And that sword was described as, being “alive” with moonlight. And made of metal that was not “human”. It also had ghost-light that danced around its edges. So the sword had a mane of moonlight?? “The Other slid forward on silent feet”, much like a lion’s step. The evidence here seems in much less straightforward; however, when you add it all together I think it becomes a strong argument. 3rd forging for AA: “The third time, with a heavy heart(Here, I think of Lady Stonehenge, undead), for he knew beforehand what he must do to finish the blade, Azor Ahai worked for a hundred days and nights until it was finished. This time, he called for his wife, Nissa Nissa, and asked her to bare her breast. He drove his sword into her living heart, her soul combining with the steel of the sword, creating Lightbringer, the Red Sword of Heroes. Lightbringer was henceforth always warm to the touch. 3rd forging for Waymar: This one is a little less obvious. But if Will is symbolically Nissa Nissa. Then this would be the 3rd forging. He did call for Will. Here’s the quote, “Will, where are you?” Ser Waymar called up. “Can you see anything?” And perhaps he really broke Will’s heart.(emotionally) Here’s an odd quote that might speak to those feelings. Though we don’t see Will bearing his breasts. Perhaps he did that at Craster’s (tongue in cheek). Next, it should also be noted that, “Ser Waymar had been a Sworn Brother of the Night’s Watch for less than half a year”…..The math here is 6 mos.= 180 days. This equals the time for the 3 forgings. 30+50+100= 180——Nice math right! The next essay (not written) talks about Waymar joining his 12 new friends ( Three of them … four … five … ) that just stabbed him and his journey as the Last Hero will begin. The math here is 3+4+5=12. Each one got one stab. There is some more support for this math earlier in the chapter in the form foreshadowing. Earlier in the chapter Waymar asks Will, “ Have you drawn any watches this past week, Will?”. To which Will replies, “Yes ,m’lord”. Then Will thinks, “There never was a week when he did not draw a dozen bloody watches. What was the man driving at?” ….”Draw” or “Drawn” refers to the swords being drawn. Next, remember that the swords in the prologue all personify their wielder. So the Others in the Prologue are the swords that are drawn. Does this mean that Will drew them? I believe so but that can be another discussion. Furthermore, the Others in the Prologue are referred to as watchers. Here’s the quote, “Behind him, to right, to left, all around him, the watchers stood patient, faceless, silent….Then, of coarse, “bloody” would refer to the “cold butchery”. The Other who was heard also cracking and stabbed a courageous, snarling Waymar (the lion)has covered his sword in blood and is looking now for his Nissa Nissa. Is he Cold hands?? Not sure. Thanks for reading. Consider this also, Waymar was also a sword of Yohn Royce. Look at the runes first on the Royce House sigil: [Royce sigil](https://awoiaf.westeros.org/images/c/cf/House_Royce.svg) The words for House Royce are “We Remember”. I think the runes on the sigil for House Royce spell out “ Royce Remember”. Take a look. I think you’ll agree. Now look at this: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/50/Futhorc_Rune_Chart.png We are able to pull the letters for the name “Royce” and here it is: R- riding O- estate Y- ? C- Sun E- Steed Sun, steed, riding, (not sure what estate means, inheritance?), and we aren’t given “y” but the rest gives us this to consider: It would be fun to look at Greek mythology and infer Yohn Royce the Bronze King as representing Apollo the Sun God and God of Prophecy. And then inferring his 3 sons as the three forgings of lightbringer. At minimum I think we can House Royce believes in the old prophecies. Check this out: Andar Royce - Lost to The Lion of Lannister at the Hand’s Tourney at King’s Landing.(2nd forging) Robar Royce - He becomes Robar the Red in Renly’s rainbow guard.(3rd forging) Waymar Royce - would in this case represent the (1 st lightbringer forging.) Waymar did fight some being with some watery description: “Its armor seemed to change color as it moved; here it was white as new-fallen snow, there black as shadow, everywhere dappled with the deep grey-green of the trees. The patterns ran like moonlight on water with every step it took.” Again I think the meeting in the clearing was no chance meeting. It was prophesied. And Waymar was the sacrific. He had been groomed and was very prepared for his “vocation”. Waymar being stabbed under the arm reminds me of the spear of destiny used to stab Jesus. He dies with this “arm out-flung”. Jon dies with an arm out. Together they callus complete the image of Jesus on the cross. Waymar’s hubris marred the way and changed the outcome of events for him.
  10. How about Waymar “marring the way”??
  11. Here a nice quote in ASOS Chapt. 18, “Dolorous Edd had said, “I knew a man once who wore his sword on a chain around his neck like that. One day he stumbled, and the hilt went up his nose.”…….this is the quote that led me to consider that hilts could personify their owner.
  12. Can I get some help to expand this metaphor between LOTR and AGOT How about this for “Waymar”? Royce marred the way when he did this…, ““Gods!” he heard behind him. A sword slashed at a branch as Ser Waymar Royce gained the ridge. He stood there beside the sentinel, longsword in hand, his cloak billowing behind him as the wind came up, outlined nobly against the stars for all to see.” Should take the lords name in vain:) For fun picture this: The sentinel tree is Lord Sauron (“branches grabbed at his longsword and tugged on his splendid sable cloak”.) and Waymar is Isildur. Waymar’s broken sword makes a nice stand in for Narsil. Waymar cuts the “ring” from the sentinel’s finger:) Guess who the ring is….??? The ring is found by somebody who lives along time in a cave(Golem/Bloodraven). Uncle (Bilbo/ Benjen) gives the “ring” to (Frodo/Jon), who both happen to have a friend named Sam. Later, they meet up with (Pippin/Pyp) and (Merry/Grenn?) and go on a (grand quest/great ranging). The answer: Ghost!:) To further the metaphor: (Sauron/ Sentinel tree) Has his spirit leave him and is now represented by a “Burning blue eye”. The Two Trees of Valinor Laurelin and Telperion(Sun and Moon)/Ironwood tree and Sentinel Tree? (From AGOT prologue) The Destrier(From the prologue)/Ungoliant the giant spider. The Destrier was tied to it when it got struck by lightning (I’m sure that stung)and became the stump and ironwood bridge. His entrails were hanging out later in ASOS. Melkor / Other?? Mirkwood/ Haunted forest?? Soooo …..all Jon needs to do is take “Ghost to Mount Doom”.
  13. How about this for “Waymar”? Royce marred the way when he did this…, ““Gods!” he heard behind him. A sword slashed at a branch as Ser Waymar Royce gained the ridge. He stood there beside the sentinel, longsword in hand, his cloak billowing behind him as the wind came up, outlined nobly against the stars for all to see.” Should take the lords name in vain:) For fun picture this: The sentinel tree is Lord Sauron (“branches grabbed at his longsword and tugged on his splendid sable cloak”.) and Waymar is Isildur. Waymar’s broken sword makes a nice stand in for Narsil. Waymar cuts the “ring” from the sentinel’s finger:) Guess who the ring is….??? The ring is found by somebody who lives along time in a cave(Golem/Bloodraven). Uncle (Bilbo/ Benjen) gives the “ring” to (Frodo/Jon), who both happen to have a friend named Sam. Later, they meet up with (Pippin/Pyp) and (Merry/Grenn?) and go on a (grand quest/great ranging). The answer: Ghost!:) To further the metaphor: (Sauron/ Sentinel tree) Has his spirit leave him and is now represented by a “Burning blue eye”. The Two Trees of Valinor Laurelin and Telperion(Sun and Moon)/Ironwood tree and Sentinel Tree? (From AGOT prologue) The Destrier(From the prologue)/Ungoliant the giant spider. The Destrier was tied to it when it got struck by lightning (I’m sure that stung)and became the stump and ironwood bridge. His entrails were hanging out later in ASOS. Melkor / Other?? Mirkwood/ Haunted forest?? Soooo …..all Jon needs to do is take “Ghost to Mount Doom”.
  14. Update! When the 3 rangers stopped at Craster’s Waymar revealed the fact that he had a “Black steel sword”. Here’s the quote by Craster talking to Lord Mormont: “Aye, those three I recall. The lordling no older than one of these pups. Too proud to sleep under my roof, him in his sable cloak and black steel.” Waymar must have unsheathed his sword at some point while he was there. Why? I’m not sure. I could use some help discovering that. But I can tell you with some certainty that this is the root of the conflict between Gared and Waymar. Read this quote: “Gared says they were chasing raiders. I told him, with a commander that green, best not catch ’em. Gared seems to be taking Craster’s side in the dispute. Is this line telling us that Waymar took off ahead or is Craster simply referring to the raiders. Regardless, Craster says Gared isn’t half-bad. They certainly seem to have been getting along. The question changes: What happened at Craster’s ( please textual support)
  15. How about this for “Waymar”? Royce marred the way when he did this…, ““Gods!” he heard behind him. A sword slashed at a branch as Ser Waymar Royce gained the ridge. He stood there beside the sentinel, longsword in hand, his cloak billowing behind him as the wind came up, outlined nobly against the stars for all to see.” Should take the lords name in vain:) For fun picture this: The sentinel tree is Lord Sauron (“branches grabbed at his longsword and tugged on his splendid sable cloak”.) and Waymar is Isildur. Waymar’s broken sword makes a nice stand in for Narsil. Waymar cuts the “ring” from the sentinel’s finger:) Guess who the ring is….??? The ring is found by somebody who lives along time in a cave(Golem/Bloodraven). Uncle (Bilbo/ Benjen) gives the “ring” to (Frodo/Jon), who both happen to have a friend named Sam. Later, they meet up with (Pippin/Pyp) and (Merry/Grenn?) and go on a (grand quest/great ranging). The answer: Ghost!:) To further the metaphor: (Sauron/ Sentinel tree) Has his spirit leave him and is now represented by a “Burning blue eye”. The Two Trees of Valinor Laurelin and Telperion(Sun and Moon)/Ironwood tree and Sentinel Tree? (From AGOT prologue) The Destrier(From the prologue)/Ungoliant the giant spider. The Destrier was tied to it when it got struck by lightning (I’m sure that stung)and became the stump and ironwood bridge. His entrails were hanging out later in ASOS. Melkor / Other?? Mirkwood/ Haunted forest?? Soooo …..all Jon needs to do is take “Ghost to Mount Doom”. Here in the World of ICE and Fire. The trees are often viewed as old Gods. In the LOTR Sauron, a Lieutenant of Morgoth, is a Maia. Maia being a spirit that descended to Arda to help shape the world in the LOTR. And Martin has created the imagery of the tree reaching down to grab at Waymar. Much like Sauron is reaching down toward Isildur at the end scene of the battle of the Last Alliance in the LOTR. Isildur, like Waymar, slashes at the hand of Sauron. Albeit, Isildur’s slashing would seem more desperate. But you’ve reminded me that I should’ve pointed out that the sentinel trees in the prologue symbolically deliver Ghost. Here’s a passage from chapter 18 ASOS where Ghost is the plop of snow. “The lower branches of the great green sentinel shed their burden of snow with a soft wet plop.” It would be a lengthy discussion to explain in detail why Ghost lines up with this scene in ASOS but if you except that than the rest of the OP is fun to consider. But the metaphor begins with Ghost as the ring on Sauron’s finger. I should have explained that better in my OP. Thx
  16. How about this for “Waymar”? Royce marred the way when he did this…, ““Gods!” he heard behind him. A sword slashed at a branch as Ser Waymar Royce gained the ridge. He stood there beside the sentinel, longsword in hand, his cloak billowing behind him as the wind came up, outlined nobly against the stars for all to see.” Should take the lords name in vain:) For fun picture this: The sentinel tree is Lord Sauron (“branches grabbed at his longsword and tugged on his splendid sable cloak”.) and Waymar is Isildur. Waymar’s broken sword makes a nice stand in for Narsil. Waymar cuts the “ring” from the sentinel’s finger:) Guess who the ring is….??? The ring is found by somebody who lives along time in a cave(Golem/Bloodraven). Uncle (Bilbo/ Benjen) gives the “ring” to (Frodo/Jon), who both happen to have a friend named Sam. Later, they meet up with (Pippin/Pyp) and (Merry/Grenn?) and go on a (grand quest/great ranging). The answer: Ghost!:)
  17. How about this for “Waymar”? Royce marred the way when he did this…, ““Gods!” he heard behind him. A sword slashed at a branch as Ser Waymar Royce gained the ridge. He stood there beside the sentinel, longsword in hand, his cloak billowing behind him as the wind came up, outlined nobly against the stars for all to see.” Should take the lords name in vain:) For fun picture this: The sentinel tree is Lord Sauron (“branches grabbed at his longsword and tugged on his splendid sable cloak”.) and Waymar is Isildur. Waymar’s broken sword makes a nice stand in for Narsil. Waymar cuts the “ring” from the sentinel’s finger:) Guess who the ring is….??? The ring is found by somebody who lives along time in a cave(Golem/Bloodraven). Uncle (Bilbo/ Benjen) gives the “ring” to (Frodo/Jon), who both happen to have a friend named Sam. Later, they meet up with (Pippin/Pyp) and (Merry/Grenn?) and go on a (grand quest/great ranging). The answer: Ghost!:)
  18. How can the remaining pups not be hers?
  19. A few things…..The ruins on the shield of house Royce give the letters to spell Royce. Research will give you the meaning of those Anglo-Saxon ruins. Take a look;) “Dance with me then” ……Anagram- “white chanted men” or “White men chanted” or “Men chanted white” or “Chanted white men” And Waymar is fore filling part of the a Lightbringer prophecy. The first forging. His brothers fore fill the other two. The wildling camp is just a green dream that Will is having.
  20. I’ve observed that all swords in AGOT prologue are a personification of it’s owner. “Alive with light” is like “fire of the Gods” language. Note also that the word “shard” is used to describe the sword. Shard, like a shard of glass, means that it’s a part of a great whole. Moonlight…moon blood….blood and fire….life fire. Life fire of Ghost? “Ghost light”
  21. I feel that a big part of the prologue is a green dream( wildling camp) Most of the prologue is symbolic and less literal. This makes it very difficult for a visual interpretation. As far as how they got south of the wall there’s this: Word play: Gared says, “If it snows, we could be a fortnight getting back, and snow’s the best we can hope for.” So “fortnight”....night fort I’m thinking Gared and the wolf went through the weirwood mouth in reverse.
  22. Branches stirred gently in the wind, scratching at one another with wooden fingers. Will opened his mouth to call down a warning, and the words seemed to freeze in his throat. Perhaps he was wrong. Perhaps it had only been a bird, a reflection on the snow, some trick of the moonlight. A Reflection on the snow would have been a shadow. Raven like:) A symbolic raven.
  23. The great sentinel was right there at the top of the ridge, where Will had known it would be, its lowest branches a bare foot off the ground. Will slid in underneath, flat on his belly in the snow and the mud, and looked down on the empty clearing below.(AGOT PROLOGUE)
  24. Lord Eddard Stark dismounted and his ward Theon Greyjoy brought forth the sword. “Ice,” that sword was called. “brought forth” For”ward” Four”ward” Fourth”ward” Was Theon the fourth ward? Or was “Ice” the fourth sword? Theon= tool of the Gods (defined as) Is Theon Ned’s sword?
  25. Awoiaf.Westeros.org A person with greensight sometimes dreams as other people, but the green dreams are different, filled with symbolic meaning, images, and metaphors of what is to come. The meaning behind the dreams is not always obvious, but the dreamer experiences the fulfillment of visions in the unfolding of events. Supposedly these dreams can concern the dreamer or another person, but the dreamer will be able to tell the difference. Greenseers might also dream of their own deaths. Wargs have been known to also possess this ability. Greenseers, the wise men of the Cotf, reputedly possessed the greensight. Some crannogman are also known to have greensight. One of them is Jojen Reed, who has unnaturally green eyes. It is possible that this is the result of his advanced greensight abilities.
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