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Garett Hornwood

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Everything posted by Garett Hornwood

  1. Garett Hornwood

    Fourth Quarter 2019 Reading

    It's the first of October, the beginning of fall in the North (except for Tennessee where it's almost 100-degrees) and spring in the South, and it's time for a next Reading Thread for 2019. I'm currently reading Jon Meacham's Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush. What are you reading?
  2. Garett Hornwood

    Fourth Quarter 2019 Reading

    I finished the biography Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush by Jon Meacham. Well researched and great use of interviews of the elder Bush couple that was published around 3 years before their deaths in 2018. I read J.R.R. Tolkien's Unfinished Tales of Numenor and Middle-earth (edited by son Christopher), basically only the last third when it covers people and events of the Third Age was worth the time to read.
  3. Garett Hornwood

    Shouldn’t Robb have been betrothed at least?

    Just want to chime in with this thought. At the beginning of the books, everyone acknowledges that it's been a long summer already and the North being the North they know winter is coming and it's probably going to be long one. Why attempt to make a betrothal when it's possible that Robb or his betroth might not survive what is going to be a winter that will at be at least be 3 years long but probably longer? My assumption is that in Ned's mind after the coming winter, he and a 18 to 20-something year old Robb would have done a circuit around the North to check how everyone fared like a responsible Stark of Winterfell on the surface but subtly for Robb to see eligible noblewomen as well as to be seen as "the Heir" who needs to marry.
  4. Garett Hornwood

    Third Quarter 2019 Reading

    It's the beginning of July, half the year is complete but we still have another half to get in a lot of reading. I'm starting off this quarter of the year by finishing up The History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides. After that I have no idea what I'll read... What are you reading?
  5. Garett Hornwood

    Third Quarter 2019 Reading

    I kept on putting off updating what I had been reading, since I've finished 11 books I'm just going to list them. A.T. Jones: Point Man on Adventism's Charismatic Front by George R. Knight The History of England (abridged) by Lord Macaulay The Ghost, The Owl by Franco & Sara Richard (artist) The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien Between Worlds: Folktales of Britain and Ireland by Kevin Crossley-Holland Shadow Watch by Jerome Preisler Redemption in Genesis: The Crossroads of Faith and Reason by John S. Nixon Nostradamus Predicts: The End of the World by Rene Noorbergen Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong Cyclops by Clive Cussler Call to Treason by Jeff Rovin So far 47 books for the year, so I reached my goal of 45 for the year.
  6. Garett Hornwood

    Third Quarter 2019 Reading

    Alright, since my last post I've completed three books. The first was Go Down, Moses by William Faulkner which was a novel composed of seven short stories. While two of those stories were okay to good, the rest just fell flat leaving me annoyed with Faulkner. Two books by Faulkner and two essential duds, not bother with him until sometime in the middle of late 2020s. The second book was the seventh Dirk Pitt book, Deep Six in which the titular hero seeks revenge on a multinational shipping company that just so happens to be aligned with the Soviet to kidnap U.S. leadership to mess with our form of government...ah, the Cold War backdrop of gawd awful subplots. Overall an okay adventure story and nice filler read for half a week. The third book was a reread Sea of Fire by Jeff Rovin, the tenth book of Tom Clancy's Op-Center series and the last of the original run I read at the time. Main thrust of the book is modern-day pirates stumble onto a nuclear waste smuggling ring and Op-Center working with Australia and Singapore tracks things to a Australian billionaire. Overall another okay-to-good story, not as good as the previous book in the series but books in the series have been really really bad and so this is in the top half quality wise.
  7. Garett Hornwood

    Second Quarter 2019 Reading

    It's April 1st and it's the start of the second quarter of the year! My primary read is Elliot Brooks' Peace and Turmoil. Brooks is a BookTuber (someone you reviews books on YouTube) and I've been subscribed to her channel for almost a year now, the tropes she likes and dislikes are close to mine, and I decided to get her first book (a print-on-demand) publish two weeks ago to atleast support her and maybe even enjoy, we'll see. My current "home read" is The History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides. And my weekend read is a biography, Lewis C. Sheafe: Apostle to Black America by Douglas Morgan. So what are you reading?
  8. Garett Hornwood

    Third Quarter 2019 Reading

    Not The Landmark, I read the Barnes & Noble Classic editions. Finished Thucydides yesterday so I decided to start reading Go Down, Moses by William Faulkner.
  9. Garett Hornwood

    Second Quarter 2019 Reading

    Since my last post I've finished three books, the first was Rebellion and Redemption by David Tasker which is a short Bible study. The next was ruthless.com by Jerome Preisler, the second book of Tom Clancy's Power Plays series, it was a nice mix of business espionage entangled with political corruption but nothing special. The last book was Rick Atkinson's The British Are Coming, the first of a planned trilogy of a military history of the American Revolution that gave me a lot of information that I previously hadn't known. The book covers the period from Lexington to Princeton not only including the major battles but lesser known ones as well in particular the battles leading up to Montreal and Quebec in the Invasion of Canada and numerous small engagements in the South years before the main theater of the war was transferred there.
  10. Garett Hornwood

    Second Quarter 2019 Reading

    Alright since my last post, I completed three books. So here we go... My first completed book was a biography of Lewis C. Sheafe by Douglas Morgan, an African-American preacher of the Seventh-day Adventist church who was forgotten (because he left the denomination twice) but had a lasting impact among African-American in the denomination up until today. The second complete book was English Constitutional Conflicts of the Seventeenth Century: 1603-1689 by J.R. Tanner, this focused more on political developments and only related to other matters like civil wars or foreign policy when it concerned the creation of a political conflict. The last book I completed was Frank Herbert's Dune, honestly I enjoyed reading the book because the story was good and interesting. However Herbert's writing style didn't endear itself to me and I really didn't care about any of the characters that weren't Paul Atreides though to be honest I barely cared at about Paul. I will definitely reread this book in the future, but I won't read any more in the Dune sequence. I'm currently rereading ruthless.com by Jerome Preisler, the second book of Tom Clancy's Power Plays series.
  11. Garett Hornwood

    Second Quarter 2019 Reading

    Alright, I avoided the forum during Season 8 for the most part so here is what I've been reading since my last post on April 20. The National Team: The Inside Story of the Women Who Changed Soccer by Caitlin Murray, a history of the U.S. Women's National Team not only their play on the field but also their struggles off especially over pay with U.S. Soccer. Sword and Citadel by Gene Wolfe, this is a omnibus of the last two stories of The Book of the New Sun and unfortunately I hated it and think the overall tetralogy is overrated. Politika (Tom Clancy's Power Plays #1) by Jerome Preisler, an international tech company's security force helps resolve a political crisis in Russia at the beginning of the new millennium. While the overall story had issues, the concept was unique and still makes me look forward to re-reading the series for the first time in two decades. The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner, the first half of the book makes no sense that the second half is a reward for just sticking through. Probably not the first book Faulkner book anyone should read that is for sure (I learn lessons the hard way). Night Probe! by Clive Cussler, the sixth book of the Dirk Pitt series sees the titular character go up against a middle-aged James Bond (not the name used in the book because Cussler doesn't want to be sued, but the identification is unmistakeable). The young Pitt bests the older Bond in finding a 75-year old treaty that would embarrass the UK and open up the possibility of uniting Canada with the U.S. Finally reread Misson of Honor by Jeff Rovin, the ninth book of the Op-Center series which see's the titular U.S. crisis management agency switch from solving issues with a military team to a Black-Ops HUMINT team on the ground that prevents a civil war in Botswana based on religion (though the situation should have been placed in a West African country). My next read is English Constitutional Conflicts of the Seventeenth Century: 1603-1689 by J.R. Tanner.
  12. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Hi everyone, Based on the beginning of the December 2018 Reading thread, I thought we'd try a multi-month thread to begin the year and instead naming it after a season (because of hemispheres) I'd just go generic with First Quarter to cover January through March. I'm starting off the year with three biographies/histories. Founding Rivals: Madison vs. Monroe by Chris DeRose is my primary read to start off the year because it was a Christmas present from my aunt. My first "home" read of the year will be Herodotus' The Histories. And my first "tame"/religious weekend read will be W.W. Prescott by Gilbert M. Valentine. So what are you reading to start off the New Year?
  13. Garett Hornwood

    Second Quarter 2019 Reading

    Finished World Mythology: An Anthology of Great Myths and Epics by Donna Rosenberg on Thursday. Frankly it's a okay introduction to numerous cultural stories from around the world, but Rosenberg let's it be known that she's retelling them for the modern world which basically kills off the cultural elements of the originals. So big fail from my perspective. I'm on vacation this next week, I'll be focusing on The History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides mainly because I'm a week behind my reading due to allergies making life miserable for a week earlier in the month.
  14. Garett Hornwood

    Second Quarter 2019 Reading

    I finished Peace and Turmoil by Elliot Brooks this past Sunday, the first half of the book was good and interesting but it completely fell apart during the third-quarter because the big political developments--that make some people think this is a fantasy political thriller--just don't make sense and really soured the book for me. Overall Brooks' writing was good for a first time author and even though I didn't like how the political stuff turned, Brooks did craft an interesting climactic ending to set up her next book. I've started reading World Mythology by Donna Rosenberg, which is retellings of myths from around the world by Rosenberg along with analysis and set up at the beginning of each. Apparently this is a textbook, which I didn't realize when I purchased it when I was in college 15 years ago from my local used book store. Anyways, some of her analysis is WTF (she's a real proponent of Great Goddess/matriarchal religions being suppressed by patriarchal religions) and some is insightful. I haven't left the Greece/Rome section yet so haven't expanded out into the wider world.
  15. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    I finished off March with Vixen 03 by Clive Cussler, the fifth book of the Dirk Pitt series, which turned out to be a nice read especially compared to some of the earlier books in the series. And the last book I finished was Line of Control by Jeff Rovin, the eighth book of the original Op-Center series, which while it had its faults like all the rest of the books in the series this book is one of the better ones. I've read 18 books in the first quarter of the year.
  16. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Well since my last post I completed four books, started at different times but finished within the last week. So here we go... The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell, this book was a compelling multi-layered narrative that has a ton of connections throughout the six different time intervals (though the eyes of five different POVs) covered. Next was a home read The Political Writings of St. Augustine was honestly a poorly structured book as it had many selections from City of God, Augustine's sermons, and Augustine's letters because at the end of the book is a lecture by a prominent political historian that basically gives the reader a guide to Augustine's political thinking, which would have been good at the beginning of the book so I knew what why each selection was in the book. Next was a weekend read E.J. Waggoner: From Physician of the Good News to Agent of Division by Woodrow Whidden, a good biography and interesting look at the theological development of this important minister in Adventist history between 1880-1905. And finally I completed Women Warriors: An Unexpected History by Pamela D. Toler, this was a short book that was basically a primer and introduction and was a good job but it could have been better written. Haven't read Von Daniken, but I've just finished rereading/reading Zecharia Sitchin and while some of his theories were interesting along with some compelling evidence, his astrophysics and DNA knowledge was left wanting. The same for me with Sitchin, I really got into his books when I was a teenager but 20 years later I really see the holes in theory and science.
  17. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Finished The End of Days by Zecharia Sitchin, the last book of his seven book 'ancient astronaut theory' series. It was alright, but it just proved that the previous book could have been split between this and #5. I'm currently reading The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell.
  18. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    I finished Shadow & Claw by Gene Wolfe on Monday, this was an omnibus of the first two volumes of The Book of the New Sun tetralogy. I thought The Shadow of the Torturer was very interesting even though I didn't like the first-person point-of-view narration, but I was looking forward to The Claw of the Conciliator. Unfortunately I wasn't impressed with the second story for numerous reasons, but the nonsensical play that took up an entire chapter just to set up something in the next short chapter didn't sit well. I've started reading the last book in Zecharia Sitchin's ancient astronaut series, The End of Days.
  19. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Well I had a busy end of the last week. Thursday I completed The Histories by Herodotus, this was a book I read at home in 10-20 page increments and really enjoyed it. I completed Miracle at Philadelphia by Catherine Drinker Bowen on Friday, this was my primary read (that I take to work to read during breaks) and there was some issues with it but it was a good historical read detailing the Constitutional Convention. My home read is The Political Writings of St. Augustine, which presents Augustine's political ideas that influenced medieval thought. My primary read is my first fantasy (or might it be science fiction?) book of the year, Shadow & Claw by Gene Wolfe. This is an omnibus of the first two books of The Book of the New Sun.
  20. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Catching up a bit since my last post... Finished The Cosmic Code by Zecharia Sitchin, this was the sixth book in his ancient astronaut theory series and frankly it felt like it could have been split up between the fifth and whatever is coming in the seventh. Next came Divide and Conquer by Jeff Rovin, the seventh book in the Op-Center series, frankly this was a book with one storyline that was written very well and one written poorly unfortunately for Rovin the poorly written one revolved around the series main character. Then I completed a biography of John Harvey Kellogg by Richard W. Schwarz, a health reformer (yes, he created the cereal but his brother is the one that made it commercially popular) in the late 19th/early 20th centuries. I've started reading Miracle in Philadelphia by Catherine Drinker Bowen as my primary read, but later this week I'll be finishing up my home read The Histories by Herodotus.
  21. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Yesterday I finished Raise the Titanic! by Clive Cussler, written almost a decade before the actual shipwreck was found (in two pieces) yet besides that the main plot was a fun story to read but unfortunately the majority of the subplots undermine the overall book and Cussler's decisions at the end of the book related to his main character (Dirk Pitt) were annoying. I've started reading the sixth book of Zecharia Sitchin's ancient astronaut series, The Cosmic Code.
  22. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    This past Sunday I finished Soldier, Sailor, Frogman, Spy, Airman, Gangster, Kill or Die: How the Allies Won on D-Day by Giles Milton. A look at the first 24 hours of the Allied invasion of Normandy from the men and women, from both sides, who lived it. It was a nice historical narrative, unfortunately Milton used so many eyewitnesses that when he returned to some it took me a bit to remember them. Overall nice, but problematic. I'm currently reading Raise the Titanic! by Clive Cussler.
  23. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    This past weekend I finished two books. The first was The Rise and Fall of the British Empire by Lawrence James, it was a fantastic overview of 400-years of history concerning the cultural, economic, martial, and political elements that went into the formation, endurance, and end of the Empire. The second was a biography of W.W. Prescott by Gilbert M. Valentine. My next read will be a history of D-Day from the perspectives of numerous individuals who lived through it: Soldier, Sailor, Frogman, Spy, Airman, Gangster, Kill or Die: How the Allies Won on D-Day by Giles Milton.
  24. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Finished Founding Rivals by Chris DeRose, though it was good book describing how James Madison and James Monroe came to be standing against one another for a House seat for the 1st Congress under the Constitution and how the outcome probably saved the Constitution from getting scraped by a second Constitutional Convention. I've started The Rise and Fall of the British Empire by Lawrence James.
  25. Garett Hornwood

    December 2018 Reading

    I completed 7 books this month and here's a quick recap of them. Divine Encounters by Zecharia Sitchin, this is a companion book to his ancient astronaut Earth Chronicles series but it hardly went over new material. Earth, Air, Fire, Water: Tales from the Eternal Archives #2 edited by Margaret Weis, this collection of short stories were as high quality as the first Archives collection but there was one gem. James White: Innovator and Overcomer by Gerald Wheeler, a biography of one of the three founders of the Seventh-day Adventist church. The Annals of Imperial Rome by Tacitus, probably the classical writer's best work (though unfortunately didn't survive complete) and a fascinating read. The Guide for the Perplexed by Maimonides was an interesting look into how Jewish religious thought and ancient Greek philosophy are synthesized through rationality. Fire & Blood by George R.R. Martin, a little known fantasy author who is fleshing out the historical background of his world. And finally Teaching History: A Seventh-day Adventist Approach by Gary Land, a small book that examines how Christian historians should approach the teaching and writing of history by staying true to their faith but within professional standards. For the year I read a personal best 83 books for over 30000 pages.
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