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Falconer

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  1. Falconer

    Small Questions v. 10106

    Did GRRM write Robb POV chapters (recently-ish)? I could have sworn I heard that he did, but I can’t find anything about it. This would be from while he was alive, eg., during ACoK.
  2. Falconer

    Star Wars Thread: Don't Get Cocky

    Ohhhkaaaay, didn’t realize this was the sort of place where disliking a film earned you personal attacks.
  3. Falconer

    Star Wars Thread: Don't Get Cocky

    They only have one trilogy on the schedule over the next decade. They’ve had to scale their ambitions WAAY back since Johnson’s previous disaster.
  4. Falconer

    Star Wars Thread: Don't Get Cocky

    And that's what Kathleen Kennedy actually stated. source
  5. Falconer

    Star Wars Thread: Don't Get Cocky

    This is from HBO president Casey Bloys. source
  6. Falconer

    Star Wars Thread: Don't Get Cocky

    I’m guessing it’s the D&D trilogy, and the Johnson one will be put on hold indefinitely.
  7. Falconer

    Tolkien 3.0

    Tolkien later decided that the two Blue Wizards came to Middle-earth much earlier, around the year 1,600 of the Second Age, along with Glorfindel (who had previously died in the Fall of Gondolin). So they could theoretically feature in the show. But, yeah, he still had Saruman, Radagast, and Gandalf not arriving till c. T.A. 1,000 (presumably S+R on one ship and G on a separate ship some time later).
  8. Falconer

    Tolkien 3.0

    Without a doubt. In his lifetime, Tolkien accomplished or attempted three major cycles: The First Age Númenor The Lord of the Rings And if you avoid the posthumously-published writings, you can only experience The Lord of the Rings. The First Age is a very large and detailed cycle that Tolkien worked on throughout his early and late years (i.e., both before and after the other cycles). The First Age is naturally the backdrop of Tolkien’s other two cycles, and his three delightful children’s books* also mine this material. The First Age is my single favorite body of fiction. The First Age exists in many versions, long-form and summary, incomplete and complete. The original work, The Book of Lost Tales, benefits from being both long-form and almost complete. Only the final tale, that of Eärendil, was never fully written. So if you’re interested in this cycle, I recommend: The Book of Lost Tales (in two volumes) The Lays of Beleriand (expanded poetic versions of two of the tales) Unfinished Tales (expanded prose versions of two of the tales) Númenor (Tolkien’s name for Atlantis) was the product of Tolkien’s attempt at a time travel novel which was meant to tie in with Lewis’s space travel series. It seems that Amazon may be doing a TV series based on this. The most substantive and thrilling writings on the subject are published in Sauron Defeated. There is also a really striking story called Tal-Elmar, which is included in The Peoples of Middle-earth. Númenor overall is by far the least substantive of Tolkien’s three major cycles. The Lord of the Rings probably requires no explanation, though there are a ton of cool short works expanding on it, many of the most substantive of which are included in Unfinished Tales. * The three First Age-derived children’s books are: The Hobbit, The Father Christmas Letters, and Roverandom — again, only one of which is nonposthumous.
  9. Falconer

    Small Questions v. 10106

    Makes sense. Thanks for the thoughts.
  10. Falconer

    Star Wars Novels/Graphical Novels 2

    I had always heard that the Thrawn and X-Wing books from the 90s were the best. I finally read them a few years ago, and boy did I love them. Especially the Thrawn series, which really hit the sweet spot of the OT, if you ever wished there were more episodes in the Adventures of Luke Skywalker. I would generally avoid backstories. The exception is Brian Daley’s excellent Han Solo Adventures from the 70s, because they nail the character, and avoid the trap of foreshadowing his destiny every five seconds. They’re just exactly the kind of swashbuckling pulp adventures that Han Solo would have gotten into before running into Luke Skywalker. Brian Daley also wrote the excellent Radio Dramatizations of the OT, which are fun listens which fill out the story of the OT and also iron out a lot of its issues.
  11. Falconer

    Small Questions v. 10106

    Hi! Three short questions. I have not yet read The Princess and the Queen, The Rogue Prince, or The Sons of the Dragon. Does anyone have an opinion on whether there is any value anymore in reading them in their standalone/abridged state? Or is it best just to sit down with Fire & Blood proper from cover to cover? If the latter, what should be read first, The World of Ice & Fire or Fire & Blood? Can anyone comment on the relationship/overlap between the A Game of Thrones RPG (2005) and The World of Ice & Fire?
  12. Falconer

    Star Wars Novels/Graphical Novels 2

    Might be nice to have HttE signed, but otherwise I wouldn’t want physical copies of anything they have on sale there, that I know of. I have somewhat of a collector mentality, but limited shelf space and a limited budget. I don’t own any physical Star Wars books newer than 1999. But I also don’t feel the allure of signed books, that you feel, at all.
  13. Falconer

    Fire and Blood - SubPress

    There is some more sample art available on the preorder page.
  14. Falconer

    Dwarfs

    Not to get too deep down that rabbit hole (whether people in the story really do the nasty with bears), my point is that GRRM wanted us to at least have the image in our heads.
  15. Falconer

    Dwarfs

    Hi, all! First (substantive) post. I haven’t been able to craft a well-thought theory like others I have seen here, but, this has been needling at me, and it’s all I’ve got, so, I thought I’d kick off a conversation. If, indeed, this isn’t already old hat. Dwarfs in ASoIaF are not like Tolkien’s Dwarves. They’re humans with dwarfism. Right? On the other hand, ASoIaF is fantasy, so even things which exist in the real world with non-fantastic explanations can take on fantastic meanings in ASoIaF. Well, what if we start with the assumption that a Tolkienesque Dwarven race exists in the story, and then go looking for them? There are grumkins. Snarks and grumkins, but, we know too little about snarks, so, let’s stick with grumkins. Tyrion looks rather like a grumkin, as he and Jon agree in AGoT. I guess grumkins are rumored to live beyond the Wall, but, it seems to me to be southerners who always talk about them, and both Tyrion and the Ghost of High Heart are at home in the south. Grumkins are stated in ASoS to craft magical objects, which is Dwarves’ main activity in Tolkien. The Ghost of High Heart has white skin and red eyes. Due to her supernatural appearance and abilities, the reader is given to assume that she is a child of the forest, since this is before we learn what the CotF have completely different colorations. Could she be a grumkin? Then there’s Casterly Rock. A giant mountain filled with tunnels and mines and dungeons and mines. It’s basically the Moria of Westeros. Were the Casterlys dwarfs (grumkins)? I think we’re meant to contemplate Umbers having giants’ blood; Crannogmen having CotF blood; Starks or Boltons having Others’ blood; Mormonts and Tormund bedding with bears (cf. Tolkien’s Beorn, berserkers); and the “inhuman” beauty and “godlike” powers of the Valryian Dragonlords (cf. Feist’s Valheru). So, are we meant to make of the Lannisters that they are the Blood of the Grumkin (perhaps inherited from their Casterly side)? Tyrion is the only short one in the story, but what about Tywin’s gold and green eyes (though that would be more like CotF than the GoHH)? The fact that most Lannisters are either grumpy or snarky?
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