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lynxx

High Valyrian

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That's a lot more than I could make out, in fact I could hear individual words but that's about all.

Was hoping some of the LCS people would chime in here since this is their sort of thing.

I wonder how David J. Peterson configured it for Emilia?

Valyrian would be her 'puppy language', so actually she should speak it even better than Missandei. I am figuring creating one more language is hard enough and the various bastard versions will not be created.

Why the LCS people would be involved? They didn't contract all of the Society, just David.

Also, about the "creating one more language is hard enough and the various bastard versions will not be created." I can show you this:

from David's Dothraki blog:

Second, if you add up the number of words I coined for all the languages I was working on, I think I made out pretty good!

  • Dothraki: 300

  • High Valyrian: 585

  • Other Game of Thrones Vocab: 340

  • Irathient (for Defiance): 1,927

  • Castithan (for Defiance): 1,372

  • Other Defiance Vocab: 300

  • Other Project: 217

As you can see, "Other Game of Thrones Vocab" seems to cover pretty much anything from Bastard Valyrian to Asshai'i, Ghiscari or Old Tongue, we don't even know. But knowing that he did create a whole proto-Dothraki and different dialects of it, I don't see why he couldn't come up with High Valyrian and different Valyrian languages.

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*Seems like some of the LCS people were working with him on it too, just as a hobby.

We have confirmation that this is not the case.

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Here goes:

(unintelligible)...ic tarizzia. Qui tu tu viccaemac daivrri taepac.

Etrruc javan constas nui vale maenys (maellic?). Etrruc javan.

Intari loivalle taepac.

Uni siti vidi villac! Intari valotys!

Can anyone who's studied linguistics or languages, based off of the words that we know from the language, make a better educated guess than I'm making?

Sounds like a mixture of Latin and Greek to me.

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Sounds like a mixture of Latin and Greek to me.

Actually scratch that. Sounds more like a language derived from Latin.

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Here goes:

(unintelligible)...ic tarizzia. Qui tu tu viccaemac daivrri taepac.

Etrruc javan constas nui vale maenys (maellic?). Etrruc javan.

Intari loivalle taepac.

Uni siti vidi villac! Intari valotys!

Can anyone who's studied linguistics or languages, based off of the words that we know from the language, make a better educated guess than I'm making?

Why so many -ac? I don't hear it like that at all. For example the last line I hear "Uni siti virivila, yudari varoti" Of course some of that might be doubled. I see a lot of extra consonants that are not heard in this rendering.

Furthermore: I hear more like

Edro jawa(t)* ... indari luivale tepa*

This as the third line. I use *asterisk to mark where a kind of sound is heard but I can't make it out because of the damn music and because it's so low-volume. Also Edro and tepa could be ethro, etro and thepa, depa. God knows most american actors have trouble distinguishing dental d from full t.

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Why so many -ac? I don't hear it like that at all. For example the last line I hear "Uni siti virivila, yudari varoti" Of course some of that might be doubled. I see a lot of extra consonants that are not heard in this rendering.

Furthermore: I hear more like

Edro jawa(t)* ... indari luivale tepa*

This as the third line. I use *asterisk to mark where a kind of sound is heard but I can't make it out because of the damn music and because it's so low-volume. Also Edro and tepa could be ethro, etro and thepa, depa. God knows most american actors have trouble distinguishing dental d from full t.

The music certainly doesn't help in decyphering the words, but I suspect that other than mood setting for much of the rest of the video which has little to no audio there's also the additional factor of complying with YT's terms & guidelines defining original content which prompted the person who took the risk of providing the footage to add it.

I seemed to hear a 'c' at the ends of the mentioned words. I kept reviewing the footage to be sure. I could be wrong but I felt that hard consonant endings were being placed on the words,...could just be the accent that she used. To me it was a bit of a battle between interpreting the -ac endings or a more anticipated -s ending. It's how she stops before transitioning between each word that gives me the impression of a hard consonant ending. I did expect more -ys, -ar and -n word endings to be perfectly honest.

Most English words we use that have hard consonant endings can be subtle when spoken but always have a rather abrupt transition. Vowel endings tend to trail into the next words more fluidly. It's more noticeable in a flowing language that this seems to be so those tended to stick out to me. Then again, many of them come at the ends of sentences it seems, so maybe that affected the way that I was hearing it. Hmm,... we'll know for sure soon enough.

I did try to marry some of the pronunciation and spelling based off of what we know about the spelling and pronunciation of the Valyrian names and words we already know. Much of what she said seemed to come close but some of it was unanticipated. We'll see. You could be right. I wasn't certain if I was hearing consonant sounds or if the way she transitioned from each word was making me hear those sounds in my head. You're probably right about the -r- sounds replacing the -l- where I placed them.

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Just wanted to say that I am so PUMPED for hearing High Valyrian or any variant of Valyrian for that matter. Judging from the video, I think it's quite cool that David Peterson (spelling?) has done something that sounds quite distinct from Latin and Greek, which would be the obvious sources of inspiration.

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Since we are going to get High Valyrian now, I remember when reading and knowing that Dany was a Valyrian aristocrat , thinking that maybe there was not only Valyrian (and it's various dialects)... what if there was also Court High Valyrian? (thinking of Japanese Imperial Court language)..

Viserys may have known it and taught her. Alas she would have no one to talk too... tho , we don't know for sure there my be such characters.

Ah well that would have been a awfully fine refinement for George to have make.

Maybe she coud talk to Sam who speaks High Valyrian and not it's dialects (that's why he can't make himself understood in Braavos in aFfC)

Actually scratch that. Sounds more like a language derived from Latin.

To me (latin american spanish speaker) it sounded like those latin based languages from eastern europe (from Hungary, Croatia and such), less italian (but, "Italian" has so many dialects that I don't know...)

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In a blog post tied to the reairing of an episode of CNNs The Next List featuring David Peterson he talks about creating the Valyrian languages. http://whatsnext.blogs.cnn.com/2013/03/29/david-peterson-and-the-languages-of-game-of-thrones/

Specifically he has worked on High Valyrian and Slavers Bay Valyrian for this season. When translating he first translates into High Valyrian and then takes the text through a series of changes to turn it into the Slavers Bay creole of the language.

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The Next List article was an interesting read. I'm happy that we'll get to hear Valyrian as early as the first episode. It's gonna be interesting to see the differences between High and Low Valyrian.

Hopefully we'll get some other languages, like Aedan Stormrage said. I really want to hear what the Old Tongue sounds like. Just a few words, a couple of phrases, I'm not asking for much. :P

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Maybe she coud talk to Sam who speaks High Valyrian and not it's dialects (that's why he can't make himself understood in Braavos in aFfC)

To me (latin american spanish speaker) it sounded like those latin based languages from eastern europe (from Hungary, Croatia and such), less italian (but, "Italian" has so many dialects that I don't know...)

Neither Hungarian nor Croatian are based on Latin. What you are probably refering to is the http://en.wikipedia....manian_language

The high valyrian fragments posted here surely remind one of Latin or ancient Greek. That is because we deem those languages to be classy and difficult to speak.

BTW : Daenerys' Plot starts in Astapor this Season. So we're going to hear a heap of low Valyrian i suppose.

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Neither Hungarian nor Croatian are based on Latin. What you are probably refering to is the http://en.wikipedia....manian_language

The high valyrian fragments posted here surely remind one of Latin or ancient Greek. That is because we deem those languages to be classy and difficult to speak.

BTW : Daenerys' Plot starts in Astapor this Season. So we're going to hear a heap of low Valyrian i suppose.

Perhaps he/she might have been trying to think of Romanian. Never Mind. You were way ahead of me.

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Neither Hungarian nor Croatian are based on Latin. What you are probably refering to is the http://en.wikipedia....manian_language

The high valyrian fragments posted here surely remind one of Latin or ancient Greek. That is because we deem those languages to be classy and difficult to speak.

BTW : Daenerys' Plot starts in Astapor this Season. So we're going to hear a heap of low Valyrian i suppose.

Quite the contrary, the fragments posted here don't look nothing like Latin or Greek. We will have to wait.

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David has posted a first post about Valyrian on the Dothraki blog: http://www.dothraki....valar-dohaeris/

Be warned there are a few spoilers from episode 1.

We get to see the difference between high and low valyrian as well:

Slavers Bay Valyrian: J’azanty ivetras ji vali nedhinki sizi zughilis vi murgho.

English: “The knight says that even the brave men fear death.”

High Valyrian: Morghot nēdyssy sesīr zūguksy azantys vestras.

Edit: Seems like the forum has trouble with the macrons on hte High Valyrian vowels

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Not very well versed into the subtilities of different languages, but I loved the High Valyrian that we got in the premiere.

Contrarily to Dothraki which sounded barbaric and completely foreign (and that was a good thing in that case), they really managed to give High Valyrian a familiar ring.

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Not very well versed into the subtilities of different languages, but I loved the High Valyrian that we got in the premiere.

Contrarily to Dothraki which sounded barbaric and completely foreign (and that was a good thing in that case), they really managed to give High Valyrian a familiar ring.

It wasn't High Valyrian, it was the Low Valyrian spoken in Astapor.

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From David Peterson's blog... "The vowel spelled y (and ȳ) is pronounced just like i, but with rounded lips (it’s the u in French tu). This sound may not be pronounced in modern High Valyrian (i.e. High Valyrian spoken by non-native speakers), and didn’t survive in all of the descendent languages. So, for example, the y in Daenerys is probably just pronounced like i (the way we pronounce it), even if in High Valyrian it would’ve been pronounced differently."

Interesting! So the High Valyrian y is pronounced like the Greek u/y (upsilon)! Awesome. That's awesome/fascinating.

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Thought you'd be interested.

Tolkien was a linguist by profession. Its perhaps true that the wrote the stories as filler after his main goal--creating the language.

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