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Nadden

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  1. Seams, I think that the distinction that you’re unsure of regarding deserters and turncloaks is the same dichotomy we see throughout the series. Here, I think, we are looking at two opposing halves that make up the whole, like Yin and Yang. I want to say thanks for validating and understanding the point I was making about Gared being a drag component of a mold for casting a sword. (Gared backward is derag a homophone for drag) Your mentioning of turncloak coupled with deserter lead me to conclude that Will from AGOT, Prologue is a turncloak. I looked at the definition to see if I could sparse out anymore details. Here it is- A turncloak is an insider who is maliciously stealing data. In most cases, it’s an employee or contractor – someone who is supposed to be on the network and has legitimate credentials but is abusing their access for fun or profit. So my thoughts are the we have a member of an organization (Night’s Watch) accessing the net (weirwoodnet) abusing their credentials. And so I think Will is the symbolic cope of the symbolic mold for our sword “Ice”. You’ll remember Widows Wail and Will’s words, like swords as you once pointed out, freeze in his throat and our Lord of Winterfell labeling Gared an oathbreaker. “Ice”, later re-forged into both Oathkeeper and Widows Wail. Makes a great impression in the sand of our mold. Thus, an inverse parallel or negative impression. And I very much agree with red trees being an anagram of deserter. However:) there’s a more famous “tree son”. Though, of coarse, Bran is Ned’s Tree son. But I’m thinking of Adonis. His mother Myrrha is symbolized by the gnarled ironwood(pregnant tree) in the prologue. And Waymar’s wet nurse makes a very good Aphrodite. Myrrha a tree that secretes a resin used in perfume associated with death. And I think you’ve made the connection before with King’s Justice and Just “Ice” as the sword. They both come down on Gared. Your comment about Mormont sparing Jon after his desertion attempt making him into a turncloak when he joins Mance is spot on in my opinion:) Then you mention Jon finding the cache of obsidian in a bundle buried in loose soil or sand. I’m excited to mention that sand is used in the molds when casting a sword. But it seems reversed. In casting, the cope contains the sand which has the negative impression of the sword. And your comparison of Theon and Gared as maimed or broken lines up with the idea of breaking the mold. Like what happens after the casting. And your ragged, dragged, dagger in Gared associations are good but you have to bring Will into it for the dagger part:) However, I’ve been struggling with the fabric motif. Needles, threading, rag etc. did you have something on that I haven’t read? Ahhhh:) are you saying that Waymar’s sable cloak, where he …“ twisted their little heads off“…is a play on words? Twisted cloak, turncloak? Nice!! But now maybe I’m confused:) If Waymar is the turncloak ….? I’ll need to think some more:) And I would agree that cloak and daggers are like Yin and Yang. Just like drag and cope. Remember also that Waymar’s sable cloak was “as soft as sin”. “As sin” or “Nissa spelled backwards”. This would seem to lead into another motif about assassin. “Ass” “assin”. I wrote a small essay about “ass” and Uranus. I liked it but didn’t get much feedback. One more loose thought, Waymar Sword(martensite) It’s why his sword shattered. And Waymar’s sable cloak(sable- a fury little marten) Waymar’s Cloak and dagger, end up being some form of Martin. Not a coincidence I’m sure. Lastly, love the turncloak = turn a lock Thx again Seams, these are just my initial thoughts I’ve got more thinking to do:)
  2. Thx Seams Thx for the shout out:) It’s certainly understandable why Gared would have a negative impression of “Ice”. I mean, with the beheading and all. Like you, I just got a flood of new thoughts. I’ll try to organize them and share:)
  3. A funny word “cocksure”. Because it was Waymar’s “cocksure” smile, in the Prologue of AGOT, that begat the idea of a possible additional layer of meaning. Something other than just describing Waymar’s overconfidence. Cock, a euphemism to avoid the sexual connotation “cock”, is an imitative of a rooster's crow,"Roosting" is the action of perching aloft to sleep at night. Surly we all remember the crows we hear before “daybreak”. Especially, “The morning that had dawned clear and cold, with a crispness that hinted at the end of summer.”(Bran 1, AGOT). Listen for three crows. In the Prologue of AGOT the three men of the Night‘s Watch, often referred to as crows, are presented to us as a prelude to a dawn. “listen to the darkness.”(A quote from Gared in the Prologue, AGOT) In the AGOT, Prologue chapter Waymar tells Will(after his cocksure smile), Immediately after the “cocksure” smile we are given the marching order. Will in the lead, Waymar came next and Gared brought up the rear. Like Will says, “The order had been given,…”. Is this a subtle hint from Martin that the marching order is important? I think so:) Then these quotes, “There was an edge to this darkness that made his hackles rise.” - (This describing Will’s spidey senses going off) KEYWORD: Hackles “Royce slid gracefully from his saddle.”(Describing Ser Waymar Royce dismounting his dark horse) KEYWORD: Saddle “Are you unmanned by the dark, Gared?”(Waymar says this to Gared after glancing at the approaching night sky) KEYWORD: Unmanned Next, The three KEYWORDS in order are: Hackles, Saddle, and Unmanned. Hackles, sickles, saddles: these are all terms referring to different types of rooster feathers. "Hackles" are the feathers around the neck. With roosters, the hackles are long and thin. When roosters face off with an opponent, all their hackles will stand up in order to make themselves look larger and more intimidating. If you say something "got your hackles up," you mean that it got you ready to fight! Sickles and the long, curling, showy feathers of the tail of a rooster. The ones on the sides with the curving shape of a sickle. You can see them above, the long ones hanging down. Hens don't have proper sickles in their tails. Saddle feathers are the feathers in front of the tail. A rooster feathers are long, soft, and pointy. The two words “sickle” and “unmanned” are associated with the idea of castration. It was a sickle made of adamant that “Cro”nus used to castrate his father Uranus. Gared is heavily symbolized in associated with Castration. In fact, the sword “Ice”, the sword used to behead Gared, is symbolizing a sickle in that moment. A symbolic sickle called “Ice”, icicle. We do find icicles with a nice sword adjective mentioned in the AGOT Prologue also. This certainly goes well with the Nigh’s Watch vows, “I am the sword in the darkness. I am the watcher on the walls. I am the fire that burns against the cold, the light that brings the dawn, the horn that wakes the sleepers”
  4. This post is a re-edit of an earlier post. It strives to better explain the points made in the earlier post. What if the lemon tree is not a lemon tree? Wouldn’t it be reasonable for a long ago memory to be wrong? In fact, I’ve discovered that our author likes to play with ideas while describing events from a POV that has an altered state of mind, foggy memory, or visions that have been planted. It’s also been my experience that Martin, likes to use symbolism and wordplay to tell his stories. And so if the lemon tree was not a lemon tree what would it be? What could symbolize lemon tree? Why? Could it be the moon as a lemon? Could it be the celestial object which symbolized the coming of dragons? And if the moon were symbolized by a lemon than what about the tree? Could the tree be that cosmic world tree described in Norse Mythology, Yggdrasil? A celestial body hanging from the branches of Yggdrasil makes sense. Dany, laying at night in her bed, looking out a window into the nighttime sky, seeing a full pale moon. This certainly would foreshadow her story arc. A fact, I found, is the moon’s shape has been described by science as a lemon and an egg. In todays world we can explain the moons non-spherical dimension with science. We know that neither the Earth nor its moon are a perfect sphere. “It is known”, The Earth's slightly elliptical shape has been explained by its rotation and the gravitational pull of the moon. In conjunction, the moon’s, subtly misshapen, appearance was caused by tidal forces early in the moon's formational history. Today, the moon rotates too slow and is too far from Earth to have any influence over its shape. In fact, it was only during its formation, that while still very malleable; the closer, faster-spinning moon really took shape. The sculpting effects of distance and speed became frozen in time as the moon solidified and matured. These factors explain the Moon's lemon-like or egg-shape formation. This is explained in a paper published online in the journal Nature on July 30, 2014 by scientists. The point here is that science agrees that the moon is a lemon in the sky. This makes for great science-fiction. If the moon is a lemon than what about the tree? Yggdrasil or can we say Egg-drasil is a large cosmic ash tree from Norse mythology. From its’ branches hangs the nine worlds. Some scholars have proposed identifications for the nine. For example, Henry Adams Bellows (1923) says that the Nine Worlds consist of Ásgarðr, Vanaheimr, Álfheimr, Miðgarðr, Jötunheimr, Múspellsheimr, Svartálfaheimr, Niflheimr (sometimes Hel), and perhaps Niðavellir. Some editions of translations of the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda feature illustrations of what the author or artist suspects the Nine Worlds to be in part based on the Völuspá stanza. We know that Martin has drawn many ideas from Norse mythology. Do we think that the moon was one of the Nine Worlds? Scholars have left lots of room for authors, like Martin, to play with. Consider this, in classical antiquity, the seven moving astronomical objects in the sky visible to the naked eye are: the Moon, Mercury, Venus, the Sun, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. But then we are missing two. This could come from a common misunderstanding about the planet Venus and Mercury. At one time the planet Venus and Mercury were thought to be four separate planets. This came from the apparent change of direction of their orbits, called retrograde. Retrograde arises from the fact that we are observing rotating planets from a planet that is itself rotating about the Sun. Because of this, planets are observed to have morning and evening star positions and rise and fall depending on the time of the year. Of the ones visible with the naked-eye Venus is most well known. In fact, many legends and myths identify the two aspects of Venus as two entities. I think, indeed, that “the moon” (le moon) with its’ pale-yellow color is hanging from Egg-drasil’s branches. Textual evidence linking the egg, the moon, a lemon and dragons is here: And this, So, a childhood memory of a lemon in a tree seen above a windrasil. Hmmmmm. Let’s understand that only a fraction of information is retained through the formation of a memory and that the emotional state of someone forming a memory has a large influence on how it is remembered. In short, the memory that Daenerys has may not actually be a lemon tree. But could foreshadow her as the “Mother of Dragons”. Looking at some interesting wordplay and symbolism… In the story told by the Lysene girl, there was a moon close to the sun, the moon cracks, then baby dragons. Consider this metaphorical interpretation of Gared’s‘s beheading (AGOT, Bran chapter 1)scene: “Dragon”?……Using some wordplay…….Drag on is what the two guardsmen pulling on Gared did before his beheading. They were given order and they had to drag-on him. Next, “they forced his head down onto the hard black wood”; such that it might appear, if we looked down upon it from above it might look like a black sun with an egg wandering too close. With your imagination, picture a round black stump with roots coming out on all sides disappearing under the snowy ground as like the sun’s corona. The imagery could be said to create a symbol of a black sun and a pale moon. Gared’s head would then represent the moon or egg. It cracks(moon breaks) and blood or wine or fire sprays out…… (baby dragons). That beheading scene, on the southron(wordplay 1.0) side of the Wall parallels the scene on the Other(wordplay 2.0) or Northous(wordplay 1.1) side of the Wall. The parallel elements are as so: Gared = ragged and greasy man 2 garrons = 2 guardsmen (Desmond and “Fat Tom”) Black Destrier + gnarled ironwood = hard black ironwood stump However; the parallels all seem to be inverted like our wordplay(1.0 and 1.1), Southron and Northous(Southron backwards) —Gared spelled backwards is derag (a homophone for drag). —Earlier he was Gared and now he is derag(His name backwards). True, one word is a noun and the other is a verb.(But that’s just wordplay) —Earlier, he was ordered to guard the horses by the ironwood tree. But now, he’s being guarded by horsemen and they were ordered to “drag” him to the ironwood stump. —“The black Destrier” and “the gnarled ironwood”(Both alive) are combined or “tied securely” to become “hard black ironwood stump”(Dead). (AGOT Prologue and Bran chapter 1) —It’s not till later that we see a dead destrier. Here the (dead) destrier is “Hard” with frozen sweat and stiff entrails (looking like the roots of the ironwood stump). —The ironwood planks used in making the bridge in the next or last scene(dead direwolf) are likely from the fallen tree of the ironwood stump.(It’s like the Ironwood gave birth to some baby planks). (AGOT Prologue and Bran chapter 1) —“a rider pale as ice.”(ASOS, Samwell chapter 18) seems to be a nice parallel here for the sword “Ice”. (AGOT Bran chapter 1) The point I’m making is that in my opinion these are two parallel scenes with what I believe are some inversions. Now consider this: Compare a hanging to a beheading. A hanging “ties securely” the head to the upper-limb of a tree and a beheading separates the head allowing it to “bounce off a thick root” or lower-limb of a tree. (They are inversions here) Bring you back to my main point: The low-hanging limb of the ironwood tree, where Waymar (AGOT, Prologue) securely ties his destrier and the ironwood stump, where Gared (AGOT, Bran1) was dragged to for his beheading ,(figuratively an inversion of the gallows) are actual metaphors for Yggdrasil. It’s not a coincidence that the generally accepted meaning of the Old Norse Yggdrasill is "Odin's horse", meaning "gallows". This interpretation comes about because drasill means "horse" and Ygg(r) is one of Odin's many names. Odin is an “Old God” from Norse mythology and the trees in our story are at minimum associated with the “Old Gods”. This beheading, south of the Wall, would seem to be a good inverted parallel to the “woman up an ironwood.”, north of the Wall. She’s described as a “far-eyes” by our POV, Will. This would seem to lend more evidence to our cosmic world tree. More evidence: Again, in a (ASOS, Samwell chapter 18), we see a horse ridden by an Other, a pale rider, with “hoarfrost” covering it like “a sheen of frozen sweat”, and “a nest of stiff black entrails” dragged, “from its open belly.” Those entrails, like a low-hanging limbs, can be seen as the roots of our stump and also the horse, Sleipnir, from Old Norse Mythology. Sleipnir, it should be noted, has eight legs. Here, I’m suggesting that our huge black destrier with a nest of stiff entrails hanging out is symbolic of Sleipnir north of the Wall. Sleipnir is the horse ridden by Odin through the cosmos or Yggdrasil. Additionally: An icy hoarfrost eight-legged creature ridden by an Other….. Hmmmmm…..It might also be a great symbol for “an Ice Spider”. But you don’t need to agree with that to understand my point. The thick root that Gared’s head bounces off is covered by the snow that drank his blood. This is the same blood that is described as “red as summerwine”. This is also set up as a metaphor. Besides showing us his blood alcohol level, Blood and fire are interchangeable metaphors all throughout ASOIAF. We see that in AGOT , Prologue Waymar’s blood (droplets) seem, “as red as fire”. Thus, Gared’s blood, that “sprayed out”, can a metaphor for fiery meteors of a breaking moon or baby dragons. Lastly, his head will be mounted above a windowsill, I mean on the Wall…a far-eyes, maybe? In conclusion, are we seeing the memory in Daenery’s mind or her imagination, is it a planted thought? The red door, I believe, is a metaphor for the blood sacrifice needed to enter the cosmic tree, Yggdrasil. The blood covering the Ironwood stump is, at minimum, symbolic of the sacrifice needed to enter the next reality, weirwood net perhaps. Yggdrasil, a cosmic world tree, is connected to a celestial body, an egg or the moon(le moon). A moon, symbolic of a lemon seen in the memory or imagination of Daenerys, “Mother of Dragons”.
  5. To further your thoughts about annealing/“kneelers”. I found another metallurgy term last night. It seems to be presented in the same fashion that Waymar‘s sable cloak presents a marten, a small weasel-like mammal. It’s certainly no coincidence that our author uses a small weasel-like mammal bearing his name. The small weasel-like mammal, a sable, which Martin describes as soft as sin uses some wordplay. The words “As sin” combined are assin. Assin spelled in reverse is Nissa. Nissa is one half of Nissa Nissa’s name. This is certainly intentional. (Bonus thought: combine “assin” with an “ass” , like Jon calls Theon, and we get an assassin) Annealing’s definition (as I’m sure you know) The opposite of that is a metal that is hard and very brittle and tough to work with. It’s a metal that is produced by the rapid cooling or quenching of the alternate form of iron at such a high rate that carbon atoms do not have time to diffuse out of the crystal structure. Now think of Waymar’s sword. We know from ACOK, a Jon Chapter 23 We have Craster talking to Lord Mormont and pointing out Waymar’s sable cloak and black steel. (Bonus thought: Waymar‘s sword must have been unsheathed for Craster’s to know it was black steel) The Waymar’s black steel sword in AGOT Prologue Here I think we see Waymar’s sword being quenched as it seems to mirror the actions in the very next paragraph. Here’s the very next paragraph: “White with frost” and “red as fire” on two opposing blades. The point I’m making is that Waymar’s sword also found it’s mark. It found it’s mark in… …some watery armor. The way I see it is we have a symbolic rapid cooling or quenching of the alternate form of iron at a high rate. (Bonus thought: “high rate” or “cast rate”). This produces Martensite! That right another bit of self-promoting workplay;) This could well explain why the sword shatters. (The next questions would be who made this sword and why?) A material that again provides a call back to our authors name. He’s so clever:) Additionally, Waymar’s sword can also be linked to the Azor Ahai Prophecy: Those icy eyes “fixed”, as if mounted light blue sapphires, on a trembling sword. That trembling sword is “on high” or Ahai at that moment. Like I stated earlier, It seems Martensite is presented in the same fashion that Waymar‘s sable cloak presents a marten. And the both sword and cloak present 1/2 of the names for Nissa Nissa and Azor Ahai. Certainly it’s all no coincidence. As you pointed out “cloak(sable/marten)and dagger(cold black iron/martensite)” (Bonus though: “Azor” is represented by the Other sword through some wordplay) “Annealing” - a process opposite of that which produces Martensite.
  6. Lol….I love it. A river of thoughts. Liking all of it, my favorite of the bunch is : Immediately, I looked up the definition for cope. And… There are more definitions but this one goes along with the idea of that “bishop’s cloak”. (I’m sure Martin has made use of all the other definitions too). The part of this definition that stands out to me is, “especially of silk”. The ringmail worn by Waymar described as, So Waymar’s ringmail is soft and supple and like silk when sliced by pale blades. In this scene, “there was no ring of metal on metal” or written differently (a little wordplay)- there was (no-ring-of-metal) on metal. (So, the ringmail is figuratively not metal if we compare it with Waymar’s sword). Swords and armor are made of the same basic elements in this scene. Looking again at the first quote describing Waymar’s ringmail, “layers of black wool and boiled leather.” So in the order of it’s donning— Wool, leather, rings(not metal, soft like silk). Wordplay- donning and dawning/ don and dawn doff( the inverse of don )-“to remove or take off, as clothing” Night (the inverse of dawn) doffing those night black garments in order: rings, leather, wool So if we take off the garments but keep the order of the dawning we see Hair, skin, rings(vulva) Those are new thoughts Seams (except for: “no-ring-of-metal”). “Silk” cleared the haze. This ties into some old thoughts that I have yet to share. The first “pale sword” that bit through the ringmail” produced blood that “seamed as red as fire”. It “seamed as red as fire” because blood in the moonlight is black. So it looks like we have moon blood coming from the rings. Menstruation can be called moon blood or moon's blood. And so it appears that pregnancy has not occurred. But Waymar has come of age. More swords please…. “Cloak and daggers”, as you said. Lastly, “drag”. I wanted to make sure that you thought of it as an inversion, imprint, impression of the actual object being cast. That’s why I said “Gared” is symbolically one aspect, the “de-raG”( Gared spelled backwards), of a sword mold. North of the wall he is literally Gared. South of the wall he’s figuratively a drag. North of the wall he was shell-shocked and South of the Wall he is a shell of his old self. I think that’s why we don’t actually see his name used by Martin in Bran 1.
  7. Thanks for the comment. Was I convincing enough about Gared and Will as the drag and cope for “Ice”? I’m current reading back over some of your thoughts on “deserters” and “daggers”. I love lots of your stuff. I think writing come easy to you. You ask great questions. As for this question: I’ve only picked up on the Night swatch/Night’s watch wordplay so far. But, I think I have some goods thoughts that might help you move forward with your ideas about this question: You asked, “What is GRRM doing with the bucket and pale references here?” In the Prologue, AGOT the “pale shapes” that surround Waymar are your “palisade” or “fence”. You also noted that, “When Jon Snow slips between the stakes to go outside of the fort, he is going "beyond the pale.". In the same Prologue, the dirk deserts Will’s teeth when he attempts to “call down a warning, and the words seemed to freeze in his throat.”, is symbolic of the direwolf pup Ghost(another pale shape). I believe we are seeing the birth of Ghost here. Here’s this from ASOS, Samwell chapt. 18: You mentioned that “In a previous Jon POV (AGoT, Jon VIII), Jon carried a bucket full of bloody meat.”. This seams to parallel the bloody meat centered between the “pale shapes” or “watchers”in the Prologue. Here’s the quote: And, Maester Aemon does seam to know something about a broken sword and Will glimpses a symbolic raven. And to commet to the idea that you have about magical places. I say YES!, in the Prologue I believe this is a mirror-like portal to an alternate reality. It seams to open only at a certain time or turn of the page. And lastly, to your question about, “But what does it mean that Jon Snow has no pail (bucket) or that he goes beyond the pale in this chapter?” I think it means that he is going alone with no “pale shapes” to accompany him. Did I give any help? I’m also rereading your Theon= Ice theory. Do you have more or new thoughts on that? My thought, very obscure, are that Nissa Nissa/ Azor Ahai are two pair of aspects, four altogether. Waymar’s broken sword might be proof that another pair will be forged or brought forth. My post needs a lot more edits I think I see a connection with your idea about deserters and “red trees”. I have a real tinfoily idea that I’m too embarrassed to post. But I like it nonetheless. I’m working through “daggers” right now. The mossy rock and the weirwood tree and black water from the Ned and Cat Godswood scene are some other ideas I’m working on also. Waymar’s cloak is a motif I’m trying to decode. It’s “soft as sin”(Nissa backwards). “Crowning glory” sounds like birth, “brought forth”. Gared was the fourth beheading this year for Ned and “Ice” Ragging is also another term used in metallurgy. cast / Craster / castrated / cast rated - are another set of words with lots of play. sorry if these thoughts are not well worded. It’s hard to get them out of my head and I don’t have much extra time to edit.
  8. Drag / derag / rag / ragged / dagger / Gared / tattered / NW / swatch Some wordplay I found a few weeks ago….When Catelyn finds Ned in the Godswood. She is reflecting on “what a strange people these northerners were”, as Ned comments on a man (Gared) who he had just beheaded that morning. The comment bringing Gared to mind sets us, the reader, up for the wordplay that follows. Ned is cleaning “Ice” then Martin initiates his wordplay. Here’s the quote from Catelyn 1: A swatch, like Gared, is part of the “Night’s Watch”. (Just get rid of the apostrophe and slid the “s” over) By definition a swatch is a sample of cloth or a rag. Considering the two words together, a night swatch could be another way of saying black rag or a sample of a black cloth. Gared’s fur, “ragged and greasy” are black; However, there’s another candidate that might symbolize the night swatch, sample cloth, that comes to mind. Waymar with his black sable cloak, from the AGOT Prologue, might also meet the requirements of the night swatch. The cloak is made of little tiny samples of black furry martins (an animal with the same name as our author). Gared does rag Waymar about it saying, “twisted their little heads off, our mighty warrior.”, while drinking wine and laughing in his cup with the barracks. (Picture wine spraying out of somebody laughing at a joke) I think this foreshadows Gared’s own beheading and the spilling of his wine(blood). And consider this, Waymar’s cloak ends up in “tatters”. “Tatters” is a word used to define “ragged”. This next quote comes from Bran 1, AGOT, before Gared’s beheading: I’ve posted before that our NW brother Gared and the sword “Ice” resemble each other in few ways. The wordplay here is ragged, as an adjective, describing Gared’s clothing (leather or furs) and ragged ,as an action, being done to “Ice”. As a verb Gared both ragged and was ragged by Waymar throughout the prologue. The only difference, as far as I can tell, is ragged the adjective and ragged the verb have a different number of syllables. Ragged the adjective is said with two syllables; while ragged the verb is said with one. Additionally, the prefix “de-“ occurring in loanwords from Latin (decide); also used to indicate privation, removal, and separation (dehumidify), negation (demerit; derange), descent (degrade; deduce), reversal (detract), intensity (decompound) could be used on the word “rag”. Consider this… if Gared and Waymar wanted to undo the ragging (verb w/ an object) they did on each other and apologize…we might consider that de-ragging. And if “Ice” is ragged (one syllable verb w/an object) by an oily swatch and we wanted to degrease it wouldn’t we de-rag it?. In both cases we can perhaps use the word “derag” to reverse the ragging action. I believe this will give some contexts to why Martin chose “Gared” as the name for our Night’s Watch deserter. Gared backwards is deraG. Derag also pronounced like drag. Interestingly, “drag” is a term used in metallurgy to name the bottom half of a casting flask, It’s one aspect of a horizontal mold, used in casting a sword. The top half is called the cope. Sword metaphors are abundant in ASOIAF. We see Gared’s sword in the Prologue, AGOT as a personification of him: …Gared was a short and ugly “old man, past fifty”. He was missing “Two ears, three toes, and the little finger off his left hand”. His alcohol consumptoms (His blood is described as red as summerwine, showing his blood alcohol) probably made his face discolored and sweaty, like his grip. His missing body parts resemble his nicked sword. His ear stumps, likely, symbolize the two trees in the Prologue. The tree themselves will become sword metaphors I predict. I believe the reason Martin only alludes to Gared and doesn’t straight out name him in Bran 1, AGOT is because, Gared, like lots of the figurative language on both the Southron and Northous side of the Wall it’s inverted. Gared is symbolically one aspect, the de-rag, of a sword mold. North of the wall he is literally Gared. South of the wall he’s figuratively a drag. Gared, the oathbreaker, also seems to be an inverse aspect of “Ice”. “Ice”, the sword will later be reforged into Oathkeeper and Widows Wail. Oathkeeper, Obviously, is the inverse of Oathbreaker. What about the inverse aspect, Widows Wail? There’s some evidence for that also. The POV, in the Prologue, Will is described as not being able to “wail”: I believe that this inverse relationship that both Gared and Will have with the sword “Ice” is enough evidence to suggest that they are figuratively the drag and cope aspects of the mold for “Ice”. Will is the top half and Gared is the lower half of the mold. Thus, “Ice” personifies Ser Waymar Royce. …lots more wordplay, “deserter”, “dragged”, “dagger”. To be continued… As you can see the two scenes are relative to one another and connected by blood. In both cases it’s Gared blood that connects the scenes. Lastly, we read that “Ice” was as wide across as a man’s hand; while Martin writes the swatch of oiled leather was in one hand. And Gared was “not much taller than Robb.”, while “Ice” was “taller even than Robb.” leather/furs and oiled/greasy are all synonyms. Bonus: And present at Gared’s beheading is Ned’s ward and Robb. And that night swatch, mentioned earlier, as symbolic of Waymar’s cloak is insofar as I can tell also symbolic of Ned’s ward/Robb and part of Waymar’s wardrobe.
  9. Will and Gared, “swords in the darkness” (Phosphorus and Hesperus, 2 aspects of Venus) are a symbolic mirror of the sword “Ice” “Ice” which is later divided and reforged into two swords “Widows Wail” “Oath-keeper” Will (The two times Will tried to speak before his presumed death) “Will turned away, wordless “the words seemed to freeze in his throat”. Gared (after his beheading) labeled by Bran’s “lord father” as an “oath-breaker” Things Northous and “Southron” of the Wall seem to be mirror opposites of each other. “Widows Wail” and ”Oathkeeper” are mirror opposites of “Wordless, frozen words” and “Oath-breaker” Thus, at least symbolically Will and Gared represent “Ice”. It should be noted that AGOT, Prologue (a night time event) occurred just before AGOT, Bran 1(a dawn event) And check out this quote from ASOS, Jon chapter 30 The constellation “Sword of the Morning” seems to be facing off or mirroring the Wall of “Ice”.
  10. I’ll have to read it:)
  11. Are you thinking Jojen paste?
  12. Are you talking about the “remote control vision of Will from the Prologue, AGOT?? You’re getting of me:) I still working on Part two. (“Gods!” Will heard Waymar say)
  13. George Carlin:)….Old school:)
  14. Questions whose answers fall outside the scope of this essay are: What happened to the other nut? Not sure but… In this scene, Will and Gared, who had been riding two shaggy little garrons, are symbolic of the sword “Ice”, the figurative sickle in this case. “Ice” is later divided and reforged into two swords “Widows Wail”“Oath-keeper” Will (The two times Will tried to speak before his presumed death) Will turned away, wordless.”“the words seemed to freeze in his throat”. Gared (after his beheading) labeled by Bran’s “lord father” as an “oath-breaker” Things Northous and “Southron” of the Wall seem to be mirror opposites of each other. “Widows Wail” and ”Oathkeeper” are mirror opposites of “Wordless, frozen words” and “Oath-breaker” Thus, at least symbolically Will and Gared represent “Ice”. Was Waymar a dick? Jon did call Theon an “ass”.
  15. I don’t remember reading that:) Bugger sounds like something my grandfather would say:)
  16. To add more support to this idea. In the Prologue, AGOT I’ve noticed that the story of Adonis has been used as an allegory. Here it is: In the allegory: (One of the two trees in the Prologue ) Ironwood: Myrrha I’m not sure why the sentinel tree is not playing this role. However, most things on the wall seem to be inverted symbols. Perhaps the Ironwood simply makes a better cosmic tree of the underworld. *edit The trees follow the “ As above, so below “, motif. They are the same symbolically. Picture a tree of life with one tree above ground who’s roots are intertwined with a similar but opposite tree below ground. Thus, I think the ironwood stump and the mother direwolf play the same role in the next chapter. But that role will first pass through Waymar and the Other’s swords. The gnarled Ironwood is pregnant in this scene: The inverted parallel for this scene comes in the next chapter Bran 1. Ironwood stump. In the Prologue, AGOT Aphrodite makes a good wet nurse. To handsome Waymar. Lastly, it’s Gared who commits treason and is beheaded at the ironwood stump to stick with the major theme of giving a life for life. Myrrha-as it turns out is a resin used in making scented oils. The ones used on the dead. Perhaps the same smell of corruption on the mother direwolf. It’s also one of the gifts brought by the three Wiseman.
  17. TL:TR Theon’s fate began with the curse that Jon put on him. In this post you’ll see; curse words, “ass” and a few fart jokes. I wanted to include this essay onto this thread because it talks about the symbolism of Gared’s head…. I believe that uttering curses or swearing profanely means more than using obscene words in anger. They’re used for more than just emphasis. While conceived of as offensive they can invoke evil, cause disasters, injuries and destroy people or things. If a character utters impieties or speaks irreverently of a God or something sacred it could excommunicate or afflict them or things with a great evil. Should a priestly condemnation befall a person, doom and misfortune are sure to follow. Here’s a short list that I’ve started from AGOT Prologue and Bran 1: Will hears Waymar say, “Gods!” as he gains the ridge and slashes at a branch with sword. When Jon calls Theon an “Ass” after the deserters beheading. Robb swore, “The Others take his eyes,..” Theon exclaims, “Gods!” and calls the mother direwolf a “freak”. 1 of 4 Quoting the curse: This is funny. If we look deep enough at the line with “ass” in it we’ll see more than just simply Jon’s characterization of Theon as an asshole. We’ll see Martin subverting the main narrative of the text with the literal meaning of the word. We’ll see him referring to the opening at the lower end of the alimentary canal, through which the solid refuse of digestion is excreted. In a single word the anus (Anus is from the Latin word ānus ring, anus). I don’t know about you but I like thinking that Martin anticipated this path of logic and purposely sought a way to include you. So instead of just choosing any stinky old anus, he chose “your anus”. Congratulations and thanks for playing a part in the metaphorical word-play that leads to a homophone sounding like Uranus. And I don’t mean the sounds your anus can make. Those little heinie hiccups, booty coughs, and butt burps are not what I’m talking about. I’m talking about Uranus the seventh planet from the Sun, third-largest in the Solar System. But why is Martin taking us there? Because within the celestial drama-play comes the myth of a Greek primordial deity. And this becomes apart of the allegory that Martin writes. I’ll explain. Here’s the myth from Wikipedia: In the scene of the deserters beheading, I believe there’s a plethora of evidence that suggests Gared’s head is playing the role of Uranus’ testicle. Uranus’ spilling blood, like Gared’s blood spraying out across the snow, the figurative sea, is one small clue hinting at the larger allegory. Theon’s Ironborn status certainly gives some meaning to the testicle coming ashore, bouncing off a thick root and rolling to Theon’s foot. The idea that Theon kicks Uranus’ genitalia while laughing foreshadows his own castration and treatment of his nuts.
  18. TL:TR Theon’s fate began with the curse that Jon put on him. I believe that uttering curses or swearing profanely means more than using obscene words in anger. They’re used for more than just emphasis. While conceived of as offensive they can invoke evil, cause disasters, injuries and destroy people or things. If a character utters impieties or speaks irreverently of a God or something sacred it could excommunicate or afflict them or things with a great evil. Should a priestly condemnation befall a person, doom and misfortune are sure to follow. Here’s a short list that I’ve started from AGOT Prologue and Bran 1: Will hears Waymar say, “Gods!” as he gains the ridge and slashes at a branch with sword. When Jon calls Theon an “Ass” after the deserters beheading. Robb swore, “The Others take his eyes,..” Theon exclaims, “Gods!” and calls the mother direwolf a “freak”. 1 of 4 Quoting the curse: Martin’s cursing, from what I can tell, is a self-stylized literary tool being used to foreshadow. Mere acts of uttering curses or swearing profanely have deeper meanings than just using angry obscene words. While sometimes used for emphasis and conceived of as offensive they can also invoke evil, cause disaster, injury and destroy people and more. If a character utters impieties or speaks irreverently of a God or things sacred to it they could be excommunicated or be afflicted with a great evil. Should a priestly condemnation befall a person, doom and misfortune are sure to follow. I have identified the use of some literary tools and deconstructed some word-play that I believe will allows us to look into the text more deeply where we’ll see some foreshadowing revealed. Here’s a short list of the words from AGOT, Prologue and Bran 1: When Jon calls Theon an “Ass” after the deserters beheading. Will hears Waymar say, “Gods!” as he gains the ridge and slashes at a branch with sword. Robb swore, “The Others take his eyes,..” Theon exclaims, “Gods!” and calls the mother direwolf a “freak”. Take a look at this quote with a curse word uttered by Jon AGOT Bran 1 “The head bounced off a thick root and rolled. It came up near Greyjoy’s feet. Theon was a lean, dark youth of nineteen who found everything amusing. He laughed, put his boot on the head, and kicked it away. “Ass,” Jon muttered, low enough so Greyjoy did not hear.” This is a funny one. If we look deep enough into the “ass” line we’ll see more than Jon’s simple characterization of Theon as an asshole. We’ll see Martin subverting the main narrative of the the text with a literal asshole. It’s pretty shitty, but lines that Martin invites us to analyze are actual ass lines, or figurative butt cracks….Looking deeply we find that figuratively there is an anus. The anus, an opening at the lower end of the alimentary canal, through which the solid refuse of digestion is excreted. (Anus is from the Latin word ānus ring, anus), plays into many ideas. Here anus, a clinical or sterilized, name for an asshole and the word we derive from Jon’s use of the word “ass” is what we are about to dive into. Lets take a short moment to explain the logic before moving on. This way you won’t feel like your being led down a rabbit hole or any other kind of holes for that matter. I have a few more points to make before arriving at the conclusion. So far, I’ve given you a quote and pointed out the cuss word. I’ve taken that word and given you the definition and, more importantly, an alternate name used for it. Then, I showed you some wordplay using some crude humor. Now I want to continue with the crude humor and wordplay and point out the use of a literary tool that introduces a planet which you will see is allegorical to the scene where we find the cuss word. I love how Martin thinks. It’s fun for me to think that Martin laid down these breadcrumbs for us to follow this path of logic and purposely sought a way to include you. Yes, you! You see, instead of just choosing any stinky old anus, one that Reeks, he chose your-anus. Feeling flattered? Congratulations and thanks for playing “your” or “ur” part in this metaphorical word-play. You have now become a homophone. Meaning, you are a part of something that sounds like something your not. “Ur”, part of “Your”, sounds like Ur-anus. And I don’t mean the sounds your-anus can make. Those little heinie hiccup, booty coughs, and butt burps are not what I’m talking about. I’m talking about Uranus the seventh planet from the Sun and third-largest in the Solar System. Let it be known that planets in ancient times were considered Gods by many. Additionally, the “ass” in our discussion has a name which means “Godly”. Yes that’s right, the origin of the name Theon comes from old Greek and means “Godly”. And anus, as noted earlier, means “ring” in Latin. So looks like your playing the part of a Godly ass or Lord of the “ring” if “U” prefer. Let’s thank Uranus everyone. Clap, clap, clap. So what is Martin doing and why? I suspect that considering a fundamental truth about the nature of the cosmos as a whole/hole allows us to inferred truths about human nature, and vice versa. There’s an ancient saying that says, “As above, so below”. It’s a quote often understood as a reference to the supposed effects of celestial mechanics upon terrestrial events. So here we find within our celestial drama-play comes a myth of a Greek primordial deity, Uranus. The story of Ur-anus, a popular one, is an allegory to the whole/hole beheading scene. I’ll explain, The myth of Your anus from Wiki: From here what needs to happen is a lengthy explanation of how this myth represents the figurative treatment of the main narrative. But I think that would detract from the general crappy tone I’m trying to set. So, fast-forwarding to my point, I believe Gared’s head is playing the role of one of Uranus’ balls, and like Uranus’ spilled blood and severed testicle, Gared spills his “wine”and loses his head upon the snow, the figurative sea. “His father took off the man’s head with a single sure stroke. Blood sprayed out across the snow, as red as summerwine. One of the horses reared and had to be restrained to keep from bolting. Bran could not take his eyes off the blood. The snows around the stump drank it eagerly, reddening as he watched.” Gared, who’s sword was a personification of himself in the previous chapter(as noted below), is figuratively Uranus’s dick here in this chapter. Gared is dragged by the guardsmen who together are the metaphorical flask or mold made up of a drag and a cope components. Gared is figuratively casting. And figuratively being castrated. Note: “It was a short, ugly thing, its grip discolored by sweat, its edge nicked from hard use,”…(Gared was short and ugly old man, who’s alcohol symptoms make his face discolored and sweaty, like his grip grip. His missing body parts resemble his nicked sword. His ear stumps, his crowning glory, symbolize the trees, The drag component of a cast is the bottom half of a horizontal mold used in casting a sword. The rating of the cast is the speed of the cast. What sword is being cast? I’d offer up Waymar, who was adamant about continuing on. “Adamant”, as in, “adamantine” A generic name for a very hard material, something unbreakable, shatterproof. It is what our “sickle” is made of. The point here is to understand the wordplay going on. “Castrated” or severed testicle and “Cast rated” or the speed of producing swords. If we “start back” in the prologue chapter, we will see the personification of swords and people into swords. Theon’s Ironborn status, coupled with the ironwood stump, make seemingly good metaphors for Theon as a blacksmith apprentice. That Ironwood stump would seem to be a good metaphorical anvil. The “cast” rating of Gared will be “hand” led by our “Smith” Lord. from the prologue and bridge have additional intended meaning to the testicle coming ashore. But bouncing off a thick root and rolling to Theon’s foot needed to happen for the sake of Martin’s clever and funny bit of foreshadowing. The idea that Theon kicks Uranus’ figurative genitalia while laughing foreshadows his own castration and treatment of his nuts. Essentially, what’s happening in this scene is Jon evokes a curse from the ass God down onto Theon.
  19. TL:TR Theon’s fate began with the curse that Jon put on him. In this post you’ll see; curse words, “ass” and a few fart jokes. With this post I’d like to list and start a thread that invites others to discuss their ideas about cursing in ASOIAF. I believe that uttering curses or swearing profanely means more than using obscene words in anger. They’re used for more than just emphasis. While conceived of as offensive they can invoke evil, cause disasters, injuries and destroy people or things. If a character utters impieties or speaks irreverently of a God or something sacred it could excommunicate or afflict them or things with a great evil. Should a priestly condemnation befall a person, doom and misfortune are sure to follow. Here’s a short list that I’ve started from AGOT Prologue and Bran 1: Will hears Waymar say, “Gods!” as he gains the ridge and slashes at a branch with sword. When Jon calls Theon an “Ass” after the deserters beheading. Robb swore, “The Others take his eyes,..” Theon exclaims, “Gods!” and calls the mother direwolf a “freak”. 1 of 4 Quoting the curse: This is funny. If we look deep enough at the line with “ass” in it we’ll see more than just simply Jon’s characterization of Theon as an asshole. We’ll see Martin subverting the main narrative of the text with the literal meaning of the word. We’ll see him referring to the opening at the lower end of the alimentary canal, through which the solid refuse of digestion is excreted. In a single word the anus (Anus is from the Latin word ānus ring, anus). Let me try to first explain my logic so that you can see that I’m not leaping to any conclusions. There are a few steps involved in order to bring you to my point. So far I’ve given you a quote and pointed out the cuss word. I’ve taken that word and given you a definition and an alternate name used for it. Next, I’ll show you some wordplay and define a literary tool that introduces a planet that is allegorical to the scene to which we find the cuss word. I love how Martin thinks. I don’t know about you but I like thinking that Martin anticipated this path of logic and purposely sought a way to include you. So instead of just choosing any stinky old anus, he chose “your anus”. Congratulations and thanks for playing a part in the metaphorical word-play that leads to a homophone sounding like Uranus. And I don’t mean the sounds your anus can make. Those little heinie hiccups, booty coughs, and butt burps are not what I’m talking about. I’m talking about Uranus the seventh planet from the Sun, third-largest in the Solar System. But why is Martin taking us there? Because within the celestial drama-play comes the myth of a Greek primordial deity. And this becomes apart of the allegory that Martin writes. I’ll explain. Here’s the myth from Wikipedia: In the scene of the deserters beheading, I believe there’s a plethora of evidence that suggests Gared’s head is playing the role of Uranus’ testicle. Uranus’ spilling blood, like Gared’s blood spraying out across the snow, the figurative sea, is one small clue hinting at the larger allegory. Theon’s Ironborn status certainly gives some meaning to the testicle coming ashore, bouncing off a thick root and rolling to Theon’s foot. The idea that Theon kicks Uranus’ genitalia while laughing foreshadows his own castration and treatment of his nuts.
  20. When you say, “Dawn is a sword of Destiny”, is that a book quote or a concept of yours? When I read that, I thought of this quote, Then I thought of this: It’s the Spear of Destiny! To further your thought or the quote you found, “Dawn’s appearance is like no other in Westeros,… In the prologue of Game of Thrones all the characters mentioned are symbol metaphors of their swords: Here’s Gared short sword, Gared Description: The “grip discolored by sweat” can be explain by his blood alcohol once we figure out who the deserter is in Bran 1, AGOT, Will dirk has a shorter description, We don’t get much of a description of Will. But Gared says, Will does shiver a lot and “steal” or steel is an alloy made up of iron. And Will does put the dirk in his “teeth”. And like Gared, Will is riding a garron. Waymar’s description is longer and you’ve already alluded to it in a sort of back handed way, Here’s Waymar’s description, The “ slender as a knife.” is a simile a lock-in the point I’m making here. Here’s the description of Waymar’s sword, Waymar sitting atop his destrier would make him the tallest sword of the 3 rangers. The jewels in his hilt could describe the merging of the Other and Waymar at the end of the Prologue if we understand this about the hilt, I think the fandom is correct when they speculated that this is Waymar’s broken sword. Certainly, with his steely courage, handsome looks and being Knighted and newly sworn in as a member of the Night’s Watch fills out the description nicely. Lastly, the description of the Other: This one split from the dark of the wood creating dichotomy you mentioned. Now looking at your “Sword of Destiny”, Truly indeed this could your try indeed this could be your “Sword of Destiny!” Either the Other itself or the longsword it carries.
  21. The lemon tree In todays world we can explain the moons non-spherical dimension with science. We know that neither the Earth nor its moon are a perfect sphere. “It is known”, The Earth's slightly elliptical shape has been explained by its rotation and the gravitational pull of the moon. In conjunction, the moon’s, subtly misshapen, appearance was caused by tidal forces early in the moon's formational history. Today, the moon rotates too slow and is too far from Earth to have any influence over its shape. In fact, it was only during its formation, that while still very malleable; the closer, faster-spinning moon really took shape. The sculpting effects of distance and speed became frozen in time as the moon solidified and matured. These factors explain the Moon's lemon-like or egg-shape formation. This is explained in a paper published online in the journal Nature on July 30, 2014 by scientists. The point here is that science agrees that the moon is a lemon in the sky. This makes for great science-fiction. If the moon is a lemon than what about the tree? Yggdrasil or can we say Egg-drasil is a large cosmic ash tree from Norse mythology. From its’ branches hangs the nine worlds. Some scholars have proposed identifications for the nine. For example, Henry Adams Bellows (1923) says that the Nine Worlds consist of Ásgarðr, Vanaheimr, Álfheimr, Miðgarðr, Jötunheimr, Múspellsheimr, Svartálfaheimr, Niflheimr (sometimes Hel), and perhaps Niðavellir. Some editions of translations of the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda feature illustrations of what the author or artist suspects the Nine Worlds to be in part based on the Völuspá stanza. We know that Martin has drawn many ideas from Norse mythology. Do we think that the moon was one of the Nine Worlds? Scholars have left lots of room for authors, like Martin, to play with. Consider this, in classical antiquity, the seven moving astronomical objects in the sky visible to the naked eye are: the Moon, Mercury, Venus, the Sun, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. The Other two may come from the apparent change of direction of their orbits, called retrograde. Retrograde arises from the fact that we are observing rotating planets from a planet that is itself rotating about the Sun. Because of this planets are observed to have morning and evening star positions and rise and fall depending on the time of the year. Of the ones visible with the naked-eye Venus is most well known. In fact, many legends and myths identify the two aspects of Venus as two entities. I think that “the moon” (le moon) with its’ pale-yellow color is hanging from Egg-drasil’s branches. Textual evidence linking the egg, the moon, a lemon and dragons is here: “He told me the moon was an egg, Khaleesi,” the Lysene girl said. “Once there were two moons in the sky, but one wandered too close to the sun and cracked from the heat. A thousand thousand dragons poured forth, and drank the fire of the sun. That is why dragons breathe flame. One day the other moon will kiss the sun too, and then it will crack and the dragons will return.” (AGOT) And this, “That was when they lived in Braavos, in the big house with the red door. Dany had her own room there, with a lemon tree outside her window.”(AGOT) So, a childhood memory of a lemon in a tree seen through a windrasil. Hmmmmm. Let’s understand that only a fraction of information is retained through the formation of a memory and that the emotional state of someone forming a memory has a large influence on how it is remembered. In short, the memory that Daenerys has may not actually be a lemon tree. But could foreshadow her as the “Mother of Dragons”. “Dragons”?, just like what the two guardsmen did to Gared before his beheading? (Bran, AGOT) They did have to drag-on him. Consider this: The low-hanging limb of the ironwood tree, where Waymar (AGOT, Prologue) securely ties his destrier and the ironwood stump, where Gared (AGOT, Bran1) was dragged to for his beheading (figuratively: the gallows) are actual metaphors for Yggdrasil. The generally accepted meaning of Old Norse Yggdrasill is "Odin's horse", meaning "gallows". This interpretation comes about because drasill means "horse" and Ygg(r) is one of Odin's many names. Later, in a Samwell chapter (18), ASOS, we see a horse ridden by an Other, “a pale rider”, with “hoarfrost” covering it like “a sheen of frozen sweat”, and “a nest of stiff black entrails” dragged, like Gared to the stump, “from its open belly.” Those entrails, like a low-hanging limb, can be seen as the roots of our stump and the horse Sleipnir eight-legs belonging to Odin. An eight-legged mount? Sounds like something from old Nans tales. The thick root that Gared’s head bounces off is covered by the snow that drank his blood. This is the same blood that is described as “red as summerwine”. Besides showing us his blood alcohol, it’s metaphor. In AGOT , Prologue Waymar’s blood (droplets) seem,“as red as fire”. Blood and fire are interchangeable metaphors all throughout ASOIAF. Thus, Gared’s blood, that “sprayed out”, is a metaphor for fiery meteors of a breaking moon. Later, his head will be mounted above a windowsill, I mean on I wall. So, Yggdrasil can be symbolically connected to dragons through an egg, which is like a moon. A moon, symbolic of a lemon seen in the memory of Daenerys, “Mother of Dragons”. Simply, she’s probably not seeing a lemon tree in Bravos.
  22. Here’s some foreshadowing you might appreciate: Here, the word-smith, Martin forging at his iron-desk with a quill and inkwell as his hammer and forge; after dipping his quill, is cleverly placing the “shadow” into the foreground “in front of Royce.” alerting readers that something will be happening alluding to future plot. This is the artistry of Martin’s style. A shadow in the foreground, foreshadow. Paying close attention to the rest of the passage we see a description of the “shadow” … Ideas about this foreshadowing:)??
  23. Here’s some foreshadowing you might appreciate: “A shadow emerged from the dark of the wood. It stood in front of Royce. Tall, it was, and gaunt and hard as old bones, with flesh pale as milk.” (Prologue, AGOT) Here, the word-smith, Martin forging at his iron-desk with a quill and inkwell as his hammer and forge; after dipping his quill, is cleverly placing the “shadow” into the foreground “in front of Royce.” alerting readers that something will be happening alluding to future plot. This is the artistry of Martin’s style. A shadow in the foreground, foreshadow. Paying close attention to the rest of the passage we see a description of the “shadow” … Ideas about this foreshadowing:)??
  24. Something to note: Will immediately pulled his garron over after hearing the wolf’s howl. Here it is: “Somewhere off in the wood a wolf howled. Will pulled his garron over beneath an ancient gnarled ironwood and dismounted.” And consider the symbolic imagery created by Martin with the “great rock” in the AGOT Prologue. Here are the quotes: “They put up a lean-to against the rock.” “Moonlight shone down on the clearing, the ashes of the firepit, the snow-covered lean-to, the great rock, the little half-frozen stream.” Compare and contrast that image with this from Bran 1, AGOT: “Half-buried in bloodstained snow, a huge dark shape slumped in death.” ”Bran’s heart was thumping in his chest as he pushed through a waist-high drift to his brothers’ side.” Analysis: A huge/great dark shape half snow-covered (snow drift) like a lean-to against a rock. Not moving and “hard beside a stream”, Will said. Like a frozen dead direwolf by a river. Gared himself is not a bad metaphor for the Mother direwolf when you consider 2 ears, 3 toes, and the little finger from his left hand. From the Mother direwolf, she lost 2 female pups, 3 male pups, and a little runt. Gared, with ragged furs, like the Mother direwolf died from a throat wound. I believe that the Mother direwolf was needex to get “Ghost” south of the Wall. To get a Norhtuos Southron. And like Gared said, they “could be a fortnight getting back” or a nightfort getting back. The answers to the question lay somewhere in the symbolism, metaphors, and word play.
  25. Southron an inverted parallel of Northous
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