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Greymoon

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  1. Greymoon

    References and Homages

    Someone probably pointed that out before, but... Joy Hill, bastard daughter of Gerion Lannister, named after Tolkien's secretary Joy Hill. Bilbo's last song, fits Gerrion: The song was original set to music by Donald Swann. Donnel Swann is brother to Balon Swann of the KG.
  2. Greymoon

    Official Testing Thread

  3. Greymoon

    [twow Spoilers] Arianne II, Part 2

    There's plenty of hints that women in Westeros are more important than we give them credit for. There's this soon to be published novella, the She-Wolves of Winterfell that from the title alone, seems to imply that things have not always been 'handled' by men, even in Winterfell. We have examples of the Mormonts women, who are fierce fighters and have no husbands that we know of. The spearwives, are exclusively women as well, and, from Ygritte's own words, it seems that knowledge is passed down from mother to daughter amongst them. We know that the fathers blood and titles matters little to wildlings but it's possible that some of the wildlings clans are matriarchal. In Dorne, women inherit just as well as men. Balon Greyjoy preferred his own daughter over his son - Asha believed herself entitled to become queen of the iron island. This might well be an exception, but I don't believe that such things happen, 'just like that'. I believe that Balon's trust in his daughter's abilities shows that there has been precedents in the Iron Island's history, were women have played an important role. If every man and woman is shaped by his own society, a child of his/her 'time', then I think it's logical to believe that other women have paved the way for Asha. There's women like Olenna Tyrell, as well - one can argue that she's not the 'Lord' of highgarden but she is the de facto ruler of house Tyrell. And Melisandre, is a rather important player. Just as Sansa could have immense power at the tip of her fingers, were she only to reach for it. The 'cultural norms' are clearly not so well defined since all around Westeros (Dorne, beyond the wall), and inside Westeros (Highgarden, Bear Island) women have been powerful. I wouldn't dismiss women that quickly, especially since GRRM has made a point of killing off a lot of the young men in the 7K.
  4. Greymoon

    Small questions for ADwD, v.V

    a bit off topic mayhap, and not truly relevant but...I was thinking about homosexuality in westeros, at the wall and in the free cities/Slaver's bay. SPOILERS AHEAH FOR A DANCE WITH DRAGONS In the Melissandre Chapter (p416 hardcover), the men of the night's watch discover the bodies of three rangers. One of them is a certain Garth. When Alf of Runnymudd, a queen's man, learns of Garth's death he "let out a howl loud enough to wake sleepers in the shadow tower" and Jon orders to "put him to bed and give him some mulled wine." It seems pretty obvious to me, that the two men were involved. Anyway, did any one else ever think about homosexuality on the wall? and what other characters might be lovers that we have overlooked? it could give an interesting spin on some of the dynamics between night's watch brothers. On another note, Jon's been accused of all kinds of 'evil feats' by his brothers and ennemies, so his friendship with Satin might also have caused some contempt...because even though homosexuality is a badly kept secret in westeros I think it's only tolerated as long as one keeps up appearances. For the Iron Men (Victarion) it seems alright to "use a man as a woman" as long as one is the active participant (aggressor, in that case) in the act. In Slaver's bay, it seems slightly different. Dany's reaction to Xaro, implies that homosexuality is not quite a taboo topic "I am not so foolish as to wed a man who finds a fruit platter more enticing than my breast. I saw which dancers you were watching" she tells him. (p. 206.) anyway, your thoughts on it?
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