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Myshkin

Roberts Newcomb and Stanek

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Be careful or else you might get a letter from his lawyer threatening action against your "malice of forethought."

ETA: ...from his hotmail account.

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We should have quotes to mock.

Frankly, I just don't think he's worth our time or effort. What's to mock when there is nothing redeeming about the work or the quality? Goodkind at least tries.

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Frankly, I just don't think he's worth our time or effort. What's to mock when there is nothing redeeming about the work or the quality? Goodkind at least tries.

Good point, but Stanek is just another Goodkind without the sheer blind luck of having a world-class publisher and an army of overworked editors.

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Good point, but Stanek is just another Goodkind without the sheer blind luck of having a world-class publisher and an army of overworked editors.

No I disagree (and I can't believe I'm saying this). Goodkind, love him or leave him, writes about what he believes we should believe and he seems to think that what he does makes us better people (if we have the age and wit to understand what he's saying to us). Whether we like it or not, and despite his personal philosophy which has creeped into his stories steadly and forcifully in later editions, he sold his book to his publisher. They gave him an assinine amount of money for it. His story ideas (while convoluted) and his plot (rhetorical and plodding, when present) were enough for a publisher to buy into it. Granted this was almost certainly a time when publishers were looking for the next twist in the middle of the Robert Jordan boom.

Stanek doesn't even have that. We don't have to like Goodkind. We don't have to think highly of his work. But he established himself in a traditional manner. Stanek can't even get a sniff unless it's of himself doing the work.

Do we really need an excerpt defiling the pages of Westeros when you can get it off the link to his site? That's bad enough if you ask me.

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No I disagree (and I can't believe I'm saying this). Goodkind, love him or leave him, writes about what he believes we should believe and he seems to think that what he does makes us better people (if we have the age and wit to understand what he's saying to us). Whether we like it or not, and despite his personal philosophy which has creeped into his stories steadly and forcifully in later editions, he sold his book to his publisher. They gave him an assinine amount of money for it. His story ideas (while convoluted) and his plot (rhetorical and plodding, when present) were enough for a publisher to buy into it. Granted this was almost certainly a time when publishers were looking for the next twist in the middle of the Robert Jordan boom.

Stanek doesn't even have that. We don't have to like Goodkind. We don't have to think highly of his work. But he established himself in a traditional manner. Stanek can't even get a sniff unless it's of himself doing the work.

Do we really need an excerpt defiling the pages of Westeros when you can get it off the link to his site? That's bad enough if you ask me.

Holy crap!! I'm not going to argue with you because I can only imagine how painful that must have been to write.

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Good point, but Stanek is just another Goodkind without the sheer blind luck of having a world-class publisher and an army of overworked editors.

According to Stanek several big houses have made offers on his books, but he turned them down because he felt that "the time wasn't right".

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Very good points, Jaxom. At least TG had the book sales to back him up.

Sure, but Stanek is also much more cute and cuddly with his neatly cropped beard and hair. He reminds me of an Ewok. Goodkind, on the other hand, will never be anything more than a yeard.

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Savage Messiah was easily one of the worst books I've ever read to completion. By comparision, Wizard's First Rule deserves the Pulitzer Prize.

Be careful what you say about Stanek here, though. His "lawyers" may contact the board owner/admins asking that he not be spoken about in such a manner.

by "lawyer" I mean Stanek or one of his friends who really isn't a lwyer.

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Incidentally, does anyone still have the link to the "Robert Newcomb fan page" that a boarder from the old board used to have in his sig? It was some hilarious Newcomb bashing.

Yup, here it is. I think it was ITR Champion that made the website or something, right? It's awesome, even if you haven't read the book.

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I shall fly in the face of Jaxom and boldly post a single sentence of genuine Robert Stanek prose. Please note, this is the opening line of the book:

Amir, son of Ky'el, cast the orb at his feet and stepped into a spinning circle of light.

You can read on via the Amazon reader here.

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Wait, wait, I read another couple paragraphs and this really ought to be read and fathomed as well:

Amir stepped back into the spinning circle of light, disappearing and reappearing on the windswept slopes of the Rift. He appeared alongside a man on horseback and asked, "Big enough for you?"

That is fucking sig worthy. Big enough for you indeed.

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How about this:

You are handsome and strong, and I know in my heart that you will not hurt me.

Thanks, Vagrancy! :)

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More, just for Wolf Maid.

Ashwar clinched his horse's bridle in his hand and held him still. In the stories of old, Titans had ruled over men and elves, and Amir had the qualities of a ruler. Even with him ahorse and Amir kneeling, the Titan towered over him and it was hard to say how big he really was. Twelve feet tall maybe or fourteen, Ashwar thought, maybe taller. His broad chest and muscular arms made him seem bigger, much bigger, like some sort of towering oak that had been uprooted and transformed. But his face wasn't brutish and square like a giant's. It was refined and round, very manlike, just unusually proportioned, with a jutting chin, high cheekbones, and dark eyes so large and deep-set that they seemed high mountain caverns, or perhaps wells, whose depths swept to the Titan's very soul.

I have a feeling that if I come across a love scene, it is going to be...overwhelming. Like a deep well or high mountain cavern, one or the other.

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Amir didn't know whether it was the veins of black that streaked otherwise pure white hair, the eyebrows with matching spikes of black mixed with gray or the beard that flowed to the middle of his chest in a sheet of pure silver that made Noman seem a king, but he seemed a king nonetheless..

Bah, now that GRRM passage about Tyrion seeming a king in AGOT is just so weak in comparison.

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