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Dotrakhi is Turkish

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It sounds nothing like Arabic.

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It sounds nothing like Arabic.

This is how David Peterson who created the language describes it:

You know, most people probably don’t really know what Arabic actually sounds like, so to an untrained ear, it might sound like Arabic. To someone who knows Arabic, it doesn’t. I tend to think of the sound as a mix between Arabic (minus the distinctive pharyngeals) and Spanish, due to the dental consonants.

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How come they seem also a mix of Ottoman Empire? Apperance or behavior?

Just cause an Arakh and Scimitar are both curved blades... Ottomans had a navy, giant cannons, advanced medical techniques... used armour, weren't nomads, really nothing alike except they had curved swords and horses

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I'm from Turkey. And i don't think they are similar to us. Cengiz han and his riders maybe...

Edited by Marco

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Those wore armour... Believe me they are inspired by a mix of cultures, but mostly comparable to the Huns.

Edited by StannisandDaeny

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Those wore armour... Believe me they are inspired by a mix of cultures, but mostly comparable to the Huns.

Yes the huns from the plains of Hungary is what I've always gotten from their lifestyle...horsemen.

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Well you guys miss the point, "Horse" has important part of turkish history who has been living "Nomadic life" through middle asia, so the hypothesis is true in my opinnion.

And also these,

It is obvious that Martin based Turkish to create Dotrakhi. Their lifestyle is smilar alot and their language. For example arakh means orakh in today's Turkey Turkish. And Khal is khan..

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Or maybe it's a fictional story with cultures based on a smattering of real ones. I view Braavos as a kind of Spain for example.

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Well you guys miss the point, "Horse" has important part of turkish history who has been living "Nomadic life" through middle asia, so the hypothesis is true in my opinnion.

And also these,

Do you have any idea how many nomadic horse tribes there have been during history? You sound as if you think they're exclusively Turkish. Going by that point, any people to whom horses were important would be just as plausible as the other - such an 'argument' just doesn't cut it.

Seriously, some people...

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Do you have any idea how many nomadic horse tribes there have been during history? You sound as if you think they're exclusively Turkish. Going by that point, any people to whom horses were important would be just as plausible as the other - such an 'argument' just doesn't cut it.

Seriously, some people...

As I have mentioned "Horse" has important part in turkish history, Turkish tribes in middle asia are considered to be the first tribes in history to domesticate "Horses" to use in wars and traveling. Some historical sources states that, some of those tribes were so connected to their horses they even slept on them time to time. Some tribes even killed horses when the owner has died, so that the horse accompanies his owner to the heaven.

These are the least of I can state.

Now, tell me which tribes through the history was connected to horses this much.

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Now, tell me which tribes through the history was connected to horses this much.

Mongols, Jurchen, Scythians, Apaches, Comanches, Soiux, and Sarmatians for starters... Now, while I agree with you that Turkic peoples of central asia ( Xiongnu/Huns and their descendents) are also in this group as an inspiration for the Dothraki culture, I must draw the line at the Ottomans, who were a civilized, sedentary people with a powerful navy and used gigantic cannons to breach the walls of Constantinople.

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I'm not familiar with how Turkish sounds, but geographically it makes sense. Khal Drogo was based on Attilla the Hun and Ghengis Khan. Between Hungary and Mongolia lies...

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I'm not familiar with how Turkish sounds, but geographically it makes sense. Khal Drogo was based on Attilla the Hun and Ghengis Khan. Between Hungary and Mongolia lies...

Russia.

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^ What does geography have to do with it?

Now, tell me which tribes through the history was connected to horses this much.

That you're asking this shows your lack of knowledge.

In addition to the many horse cultures thecryptile already spoke of I'll add the Alans, Cumans and even the Russians (Kazaks were groups of nomadic riders that lived separately.)

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I always thought of the Dothraki as being a combination of Mongols, Post-European Arrival Native Americans, and the Huns.

Drogo himself seems to be a combination of Attila and Ghenghis Khan. Attilia with his relationship with Emperor Valentinian’s sister Honoria and Ghenghis Khan with his general leadership ability and death prompting the fragmentation of his empire amongst his generals.

As for their language, it’s hard to say. It sounds guttural enough to be convincing though.

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I also thought of the Dothraki as similar to the Mongols - in fact, the Romans often laughed at them for sleeping with their horses, as (I can't recall exactly who- maybe Viserys?) said about the Dothraki.

What is Turkish grammar like? Is it similar to Dothraki grammar?

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Dothraki seems to me is a mix of the Mongols of Genghis Khan and the Ottoman Empire.

Not Ottoman Empire because this Empire's people wasn't so primitive neither so nomadic. Before Ottomans were Seljuq Turks who where nomadic as well, but Mongols fit more to the nomadic style of Dothrakis.

The Turkish people were nomadic in nature, then they were brought together by the Seljuk Turks (who were also nomads).

Eventually the Ottoman Empire was able to turn itself from a nomadic groups of peoples to a massive empire that spanned most of the eastern Mediterranean, Aegean, and Black seas.

Seljuq Turks originated from Kazakh Steppe of Turkestan. Turkestan belonged to Persia and then to Russia, ( whatever were the borders of Persia an Russia in middle ages). So we talk about nomadic people ( that is for sure) but not exactly the way we see Dothrakis in the series.

It sounds absolutely nothing like Arabic

Indeed.. it soundes nothing like Arabic. ( at least to my ears).

I always thought of the Dothraki as being a combination of Mongols, Post-European Arrival Native Americans, and the Huns.

Drogo himself seems to be a combination of Attila and Ghenghis Khan. Attilia with his relationship with Emperor Valentinian’s sister Honoria and Ghenghis Khan with his general leadership ability and death prompting the fragmentation of his empire amongst his generals.

As for their language, it’s hard to say. It sounds guttural enough to be convincing though.

I agree.

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I think this discussion is going in circles, but anyway...

For the record, GRRM said in an interview that Dothraki are based partly on the Mongols, but also on other Central Asians, and also on native American peoples such as the Arapaho. They are not any single real world group.

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