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Wildling Queen

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About Wildling Queen

  • Rank
    Squire
  • Birthday 04/20/1974

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    Female
  • Location
    Indiana

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  1. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    2. You're talking about a TV show. I'm talking about real life. Women, people of color, poor people. Those are the groups that experience oppression with the harshest consequences. Please note that there are men included in the groups I just mentioned. 3. Yes, women have been oppressed historically in ways men never have. Hence the fact that in most countries, including this one, we had to fight for even the right to vote. No one blames MEN. We blame patriarchy, under which men suffer, as well. 4. Cool story, dude. The point just flew right over your head, though. You're right on that last point, though. I am brilliant and you're missing stuff. You were probably too busy coming up with arguments about how women are too scared of snakes and spiders to lead.
  2. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    I fully agree with that. I've always argued that the show has inherently feminist themes.
  3. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    1. Take the "disturbing comment" up with bell hooks. I didn't invent the theory. 2. Funny how that "necessary degree of oppression" is always experienced by the same groups of people though, huh? 3. Women haven't been oppressed throughout history in ways that men never have? Really? 4. No one "needs" a man. Lesbians could happily school you on this point. 5. I certainly never said that "a strong woman doesn't want a man." I'm a very strong woman and I love my husband very much. That's just "feminists hate men" nonsense you're attributing to my statements. 6. I notice you didn't bring up "undesirable men." Lumping women into two groups according to their sexual desirability is very telling of you. 7. No. Indicators of whiteness and wealth are the definitions of beauty. 8. They bring a feminized view of the world to positions of power and create new images of what power looks like. 9. Stereotyping. How nice of you. My comments were related more to broader themes. The idea of tearing down the patriarchy isn't just beneficial to women, the same concepts apply to racism, homophobia, transphobia, and class discrimination.
  4. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    I have to say, I disagree with you. I'm very much a feminist but I've argued here the entire time that the show isn't misogynistic. Problematic at times, for sure, but inherently feminist in its larger themes. A lot of folks here have disagree with me, but no one has been obnoxious to me with the exception of the trolls who just tell everybody to shut up and we're ruining everything. I think there's a way to debate this respectfully, and that's all I ever ask of anyone.
  5. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    On the show, you saw it happen to Theon. You've heard the description of it happening to thousands of the Unsullied, as well as the man in your profile pic. And trauma is trauma. Whether a person acknowledges the effects of trauma or not, it's trauma. And it has an effect. During some of the trainings I attended on the neurobiology of trauma, they showed us how it actually affects the shape and appearance of the brain. I don't think that's how Sansa framed the conversation at all. She said exactly what countless survivors, myself included, have said. It happened. It was horrible. It did not break me and I will take my own power back from the people who did those things to me. I am who I am because of all the good and bad things that have happened, and I'm moving forward now.
  6. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    Rape is equally as bad when it happens to men, and you've seen literally thousands of men who had their penises lopped off. And just to be perfectly clear: there is no bad rape and "meh, kind of bad" rape. Trauma has no qualifiers. When a person is raped, that is the worst thing in their frame of reference. They have no other frame of reference for which to say, "well, this wasn't so bad compared to that other rape" unless they've been raped more than once and then the second is equally as traumatizing because of the first one. Do you understand?
  7. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    Thank you thank you and thank you again. I've been arguing since the show first started that there is something inherently sexual about using violence against men in this way and how it's equally a form of sexual violence as rape.
  8. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    I hear what you're saying. I'd also say that the people chose Jon, knowing who his family was, and their rule wasn't imposed on the people. Jon left Sansa in charge and, unlike a lot of the rulers we've seen on the show, she's speaking for the people, not herself and her family's interests. Her family would be served better by accepting Dany's rule and partnering with her, but Sansa knows that's not what the people want. Breaking a system down to its parts and reforming each individually is not simply reinforcing the original power structure. Knighthood was part of that structure, but Brienne is reforming it in new ways. Arya is reforming the notions of what it means to be a woman born into a noble family. All of this is pretty feminist, actually.
  9. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    I appreciate your response and agree wholeheartedly for the most part. Variety is a wonderful thing, diversity is what makes humanity so complex and wonderful. There will always be conflict, but that conflict should be over ideology. When it becomes a question of which lives have value and which don't, that's a fight, as it should be. And we should always strive for equality, even if it's an impossible dream, we can always work to make things better. As for social harmony, I can't agree that we should be quiet and accept inequality in the name of keeping the peace. Where do we draw that line? As for "before all of these problematic things were pointed out," BEFORE people became aware of feminism was more than 100 years ago. And for whom was there "social harmony" then? BEFORE movements toward ending racial inequality, at least in this country, there was slavery. For whom was there "social harmony" then?
  10. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    Well, no. We can argue the merits of feminist theory, but there is only one set of feminist theories. You either understand them or you don't. You mentioned ecofeminism and afro-feminism. Can you explain at all what your understanding of those theories are? I also disagree that there is a "solution" that includes inequality (and I'm pretty savvy on this matter. In fact, I kind of get to call myself an expert in this area. I earned that). Inequality has always existed and will always exist, but we fight to correct as many wrongs as we can. Suppose many years ago, it was decided that slavery was just always going to be and we'd work on having a good society that included slavery. That doesn't really work, does it?
  11. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    I disagree. Feminism hasn't lost meaning, the word has just become vilified because all movements for social justice are at some point. It's actually comical/depressing to me that "social justice warrior" is used as an insult. We should all fight for social justice. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere, for all of us. The problem lies in what you said: people say they believe in gender equality but they aren't "feminists." That's really not a possible option. Feminism is, quite simply, the belief in gender equality. Just because a person doesn't want to define themselves as "feminist" doesn't mean feminism has no meaning. Scroll through the posts above. As soon as the word feminism is mentioned, there's all this backlash. But that isn't the fault of feminism or its meaning. It just means that the word has negative connotations because people don't understand it. People also commonly believe that feminism is about men vs. women and women wanting to somehow be above men when that isn't it at all. As I said in an earlier post, feminist theory doesn't even argue about men vs. women anymore. We don't subscribe to that binary notion. Feminism is about equality, period. It's about the ways in which we structure masculinity and femininity and place value and meaning in one over the other. That value system is harmful for men, as well. Anyone who believes feminists holds that women should always be depicted positively in art is simply misunderstanding the term feminism. I'm perfectly aware that there are good women and bad women, good men and bad men. What I want is some nuance. Don't pigeonhole us. Racism exists. But don't depict every person of color as the same type of stereotypical character. P.S. I also believe that the show D&D wrote has very strong feminist connections. There are problems, sure, but a feminist reading of GoT is absolutely possible.
  12. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    You know, I hear what you're saying, and I actually appreciate that you're willing to write out your thoughts rather than yell "SJW BULLSHIT!" and leave (ah, the trolls. So much fun). I think you're using some pretty common misconceptions about feminism; however, so are a lot of the people here arguing in support of their feminist views. Feminism is still related to the female sex and places them at the center, but feminist theory really isn't about men vs. women anymore. We don't really think in those kinds of restrictive binary terms. It's about femininity and masculinity and what is ascribed societal value. No one expects that racism or sexism or any other form of discrimination will never be depicted in art. Of course it will, it's too inherent in our society. What I do expect, and have gotten from GoT in many situations, is variance instead of stereotypical characters. The many differences between Dany, Brienne, Sansa, Arya, Cersei, Missandei, and Olenna Tyrell is a perfect example. All are women identifying as women, but each is a nuanced and individual person with their own identities and motivations. The same can be said for Jaime, Bran, Jon, Robert, Ned, Varys, and the many male characters. That's probably one of my favorite things about both the show and the books. I also think you're wrong about the rules being rewritten all the time. Perhaps it's more that we now have social media and are exposed to a vastly diverse group of people on the internet and we're finally just now hearing these things because we were never confronted with them before. Theories do shift over time, but in a lot of cases, the things pointed out in our real society were always problematic. They just weren't problematic for some of us, personally, so we didn't think about it. There are a lot of people here also who are writing themselves into corners trying to fight for a feminist viewpoint. The clearest example I've seen is the outrage over Brienne crying when Jaime left. I've seen commenters here saying the writers destroyed her character in that moment. That's arguing that showing emotion, which is clearly a feminine characteristic (men aren't supposed to show emotions other than anger), someone reduces Brienne. Before she cried, she was masculine and therefore powerful. Now, she's too feminine, and femininity is weak. That's not a feminist standpoint. In fact, it's the exact opposite. So everyone is going to have to give us time to work these things out. Feminists, believe it or not, argue much harder amongst each other than they do with anyone else. I thrive and learn from debate instead of being offended or dismissive of it. And feminism is not exactly a new thing that's just developed recently, either. It existed long before some middle-class white women organized around the right to vote 100 years ago. We don't have it all down yet. First wave was supplanted by second wave, which was supplanted by third, and on and on. Regardless, it's an important topic of conversation. There are many different theoretical lenses from which a text can be analyzed. This is just one of them, but it's just as valid an analysis as any other. Some of those analyses don't appeal to me. I don't respond to them. I wish the trolls had enough self-restraint to do the same.
  13. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    Yes, and the king of his time chose House Arryn, House Tully for the Riverlands. etc. And kings have changed their selections over time, as well. All of that is in the histories. Given a choice, what did the Northmen say? "I know no king but the King in the North, whose name is Stark." They CHOSE their king. I found it to be a pretty interesting development.
  14. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    Okay, but the rulers in each individual kingdom have been chosen by a king for centuries, too. The North doesn't seem to be going for that anymore. Who's to say that idea won't spread?
  15. Wildling Queen

    GoT and Feminism: What Happens Now?

    If lesser lords are in power in their individual regions, it's still a different structure. There's a whole argument that can be made, and is being made in the North, about feminist standpoint theory here. Authority should come from lived experience. Just as the wealthy can't truly understand the needs of the poor, a king in the South can't truly understand the needs of the North. There's also a pretty good argument being made that birthright isn't the best determinant of leadership skills. The people in Westeros don't seem to care that Daenerys believes the throne is hers. They don't want her.
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