Jump to content

LiveFirstDieLater

Members
  • Content Count

    2,158
  • Joined

  • Last visited

5 Followers

About LiveFirstDieLater

  • Rank
    Council Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Array
  • Location
    Array
  • Interests
    Array

Recent Profile Visitors

3,512 profile views
  1. I believe that Symeon Star Eyes was an Other (White Walker) who wandered Westeros before the Wall was built... that’s the connection. And explains knights riding around in armor before the annals brought steel to Westeros. https://asearchoficeandfire.com/?q=symeon&scope[]=agot&scope[]=adwd&scope[]=tmk&scope[]=acok&scope[]=twow&scope[]=twoiaf&scope[]=asos&scope[]=thk&scope[]=trp&scope[]=affc&scope[]=tss&scope[]=tpatq
  2. The Paper Marios of Westeros But the Others are real, we know this, it is literally the very first chapter of the story. Ah, then less intrigued, as we know the Others are real, there isn’t a fake publicity campaign. Since we don’t know much about the Others and even less about what the shadow babies are I have no idea how you came to this conclusion or what you mean by making it... and don’t forget the Weirwood in Varamyr’s chapter... it’s a pale shadow amidst the snow. It’s probably not a mistake that the phrase white shadow is used in each case... but be careful... kingsguard in Ned’s dream are not shadows, explicitly... Moore is, but that’s fright before he tries to kill Tyrion. Barista gets called one in Dance... but it also makes sense in the context of a bodyguard... not to mention it begs the question of what the parallel is. Are the Kingsguard Others, or perhaps the Others are bodyguards and are sworn not to have children... Its hard to make conclusions, but I simply can’t leap to them being a conspiracy together.
  3. Makes sense, intrigued but confused... happy Friday!
  4. I don’t even understand... are you trying to say that Others are different than White Walkers (which is not the case), or that Wildlings are secretly the Cold Creatures we see in the very first chapter of the very first book? I’m confused Is there anything to support this idea besides the story of Bael? Because yes, Jon is the bastard of Winterfell, but Lyanna and Rhaegar isn’t enough to fit for you? Is the suggestion here that Lyanna was pregnant with a wildling baby or that Jon isn’t Lyanna’s? The Iron born are likely of Furst Men decent, although they may have come across the sunset sea... let’s say they were First Men with a Weirwood of their own and the Iron Islands were once connected... the break almost certainly happened when the Wall went up not when the hammer of waters was called, I say this because the Grey King ruled until the age of heros and on his death his sons fought over the islands, his death likely coincides with the death of their Weirwood (Nagga’s Bones). But all that pillaging and all those salt wives are going to water down the blood after enough generations, if that’s something which matters at all. I still don’t understand... we know there are scary ice demons from the very first chapter... what do you mean Ironborn are Others? White walkers are others... same thing The horn blew thrice long, three long blasts means Others. The white walkers of the wood, the cold shadows, the monsters of the tales that made him squeak and tremble as a boy, riding their giant ice-spiders, hungry for blood . . . Also just a detail, but remember the Andal’s brought Steel to Westeros... the First Men used Iron... and I don’t know why this came to mind, but I always thought I was missing something with this quote... "Would you pay us with our own coin?" Ulf son of Umar said. "Why should we need the father's promise, when we have the son's?" "I said nothing of need," Lord Tywin replied. "My words were courtesy, nothing more. You need not join us. The men of the winterlands are made of iron and ice, and even my boldest knights fear to face them." Oh, deftly done, Tyrion thought, smiling crookedly.
  5. As you point out with the Plumms this does seem likely... but I do think there is a difference between “the three heads”, if you will, and just being decended from Targs, or having a drop of dragon blood. Not only are the Plumms have a super interesting history, poping up at remarkable times, but since Aegon the Unworthy may well have jumped into the family tree, and he legitimized all his bastards, not just certain ones specifically, they could have a real claim (better than Baratheons for instance) to the Iron Throne through a male line. They are also descended from the First Men and so have a noteworthy combination of ancestors. Also, Brown Ben is the leader of the Second Sons... I don’t know exactly what it means yet, but this company has a long history which includes some truely remarkable members... not only that, but it really can’t be coincidence that every male POV in game of thrones is a second son. Also, I didn’t realize this but apperantly the Plumm heraldry is three purple globes on a field of gold. Before getting into Fossoways, as you point out here, it seems we have our Blackfyre for the modern parallel, not one of the Three Heads, but an important scion of House Targaryen. The fossoways are fun for sure, and the creation of the green apples I really enjoyed seeing in Dunk, but I’m not sure I’ve drawn any conclusions yet... hmmm
  6. @Seams love it, I’m gonna have to process the Baelor stuff and come back... especially since I always kinda thought of Breakspear and the Blessed as almost opposites, one practical and a good ruler while the other doesn’t seem like a bad man he clearly didn’t make a great king. I would suggest there is a more obvious parallel to the three great bastards, Bloodraven, Seastar, and Bittersteel in our current series... Jon, Dany, and Tyrion. I believe these are all Targaryen bastards themselves. (R+L=J and little sister D) Tyrion learned about all we know about the Golden Company, it seems to be a big part of his arc considering he basically inspired their current invasion to take place without delay. There is also the fact that Tyrion is a bitter exile who escaped his punishment by fleeing to Essos, branded a traitor, hoping to return to Westeros with an army. Dany has been visited by Qaithe, whom many suspect is Seastar. She’s beautiful, practices blood magic, and takes multiple lovers, possibly one day to include a sibling. Loves the sea and dreamed of being a sailor as she crossed the narrow sea half a hundred times. My take on her is probably the most controversial, but let’s just say lemons make your eyes water, and lemon juice was an old cure for cataracts. Jon who’s body is loosing all memory of warmth, like Bloodraven in his hollow hill amidst the frozen land of always winter. Both served as Lord Commander of the Night’s Watch, both appear to have loved and lost, and both have lost brothers they loved. The dragon has three heads!
  7. I know no queen but the queen of winter, whose name is stark
  8. Haha, or maybe she died trying to knit a shawl to stay warm... I guess it’s possible
  9. Needle locked tight between her frozen fingers? I agree with the Mel vision, but not so sure about Jon’s little prophesy for Arya
  10. Tyrion II, Storm I suppose this foreshadows the eventual showdown between the brothers Clegane. It looks like Sandor will lose, but perhaps expose Gregor for the undead monster thst he has become... And there is this where Sandor tells us about his intention to kill Gregor... Arya IX, Storm Gregor will slay Sandor because Sandor has no intention of killing his brother and thus he will lose the eventual showdown... Eddard VII, Game Sandor actively avoided trying to kill his brother at his own peril in Eddard VII, Game. He expressed an intention to kill his brother in Arya IX, Storm. But nothing changed in their relation in the interim. Sandor had no more reason to kill Gregor than when he actively avoided trying to kill his brother. Unless, of course, Sandor perceives that something has changed... Interesting, although, to play devils advocate, Sandor is the smaller dog and Gregor doesn’t have a head to cut at any more... it may be that the cleganebowl will be an upset!
  11. I never noticed that this was the only time in the series GRRM uses the word rushlight. There is an Aesop’s fable about a rushlight: It is basically a warning against vanity and boasting... but the parallels to the passage above and ASoIaF themes is striking. Dany has her door and the wind behind her threatening a fate worse than death... And Bran is in this cave, hidden from the stars, where there is no wind... I believe this is a subtle clue about Bloodraven, as he’s the one boasting here, and his motives. The kisses of the ravens is interesting as well and may refer to the old English ballad “The three ravens” or more interestingly to the Scottish "The Twa Corbies" (Two crows or two ravens!). Rather than post text I’ll link the Wikipedia... but let’s just say I believe this is another indication that Bran could be in trouble and that Bloodraven is not the three eyed crow. (And the parallel to Dany’s trip to the House of the Undying can be noted as at the end they try to eat her eye...) https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Three_Ravens Evermore!
  12. If Aegon is real, he is Elia’s son, the Sun’s son... and also appeared in the House of the Undying.
  13. Love it, except that when I read it I see: Rhaegar in his black armor getting cut down, along with Jon Darry, and cast into the river. Willem Darry takes one head of the dragon across the sea, from the Isle of Dragonstone. When she emerges again she believes she is a red dragon, instead of spawn of the black dragon. The Crossroads Inn, possibly where Rhaegar “fell upon” Lyanna. And of course where Tyrion is captured. But (f)Aegon makes an appearance too:
  14. Unless Rob’s will skips over his siblings... and you hold Jon to his vow... then we get the broken wheel, the Waynwood errant, Timmet son of Timmet! but ya, I don’t actually see that playing out... I was mostly just playing.
×
×
  • Create New...