Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Happy Ent

Judging Eye X (Re-read)

Recommended Posts

Also, it's clear that Kosoter has been highly estimated by Kellhus (who gave him the name, Ironsoul), so it seems strange that such a veteran would spend his time hunting Sranc instead of joining the Great Ordeal. Unless Kellhus asked him to do just this, like he asked Saubon to stay behind in Caraskand.

I don't think Kosoter had to be directly told to be in Marrow by Kellhus. From his comments, it seems Kosoter has gone some ... strange places with Kellhus and he could very well have left Kellhus' army on his own. He always struck me as a man who's seen too much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Kosoter & co. are definitely not there by accident. I think the messenger in the prologue delivered him Kellhus's orders. I think Kellhus is planning something but I have no idea what. It all reminds me of the large-scale diversion in The Lord of the Rings, with Kellhus as Aragorn and Achamian and Mimara as Frodo and Sam. It's just a total mystery what the expedition is supposed to achieve for Kellhus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to post tomorrow or sunday about the wolf gate. But I wanted to throw out something cleric said about himself near the CC statue. Paraphrasing "All of us, the Last Born..."

The last born could mean two things. Its a name for all the non-men ala tolkien. Or, it refers to a company of nonmen cleric is a part of, the last generation of nonmen males, the youngest nonmen, the last nonmen born to the world before the womb plague took their wives and daughters. Some of these nonmen might presumably have never even known the women of their race.

Also, nonmen can't see paintings, since they presumably have writings, I think this means they are color blinf or see a very different spectrum of light than what humans call the visible spectrum. If human color perception is only a small fraction of the spectrum they percieve then all colors would seem almost indistinguishable.

On the other hand, maybe nonmen don't have stereo vision quite like humans and they're unable to focus on a single plain, their eyes focus multiple planes in depth like a wide angle lens and the plane to plane focus that human eyes use when shifting from one view to another is impossible to them. But if they can't see the two dimensional plane, does that mean all their writing is based on carving. This doesn't seem to agree with the ttt appendix and mentions of books.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a niggling theory about Nonmen that's been wiggling around in my brain for a day or so. It has to do with Nonman art, trying to capture two or three views of the same thing at one time. around the same time, akka thinks or says about how the nonmen were obsessed with the nature of time. Now it's all lovely and artistic that they try to capture life in stillness in order to more fully express what it is they're carving. But 'capturing life in stillness' is a very human way to understand it. Look at human art, we don't represent so abstractly. We know the nonmen can't really see paintings, which is interesting in and of itself. But what if the nonmen see completely differently than humans.

For example, what if nonmen see in four dimensions rather than three? What if, when a nonman sees a dog, for example, they see that dog two or three ways/moments at once, like seeing The Dog a few seconds or years before and a few seconds or years after. Making the dog still and seeing only the present would almost be an impossible task for them. And they wouldn't particularly think this strange, because that's just how things are, as they grew an understanding of time, they would begin to test their vision and realize the limitations of what they're eyes show us. Human eyes deceive us in a myriad of ways, that's why optical illusions are so easy to pull off on humans. Often times we're not even 'seeing' things as they actually are, we're seeing a detailed sampling of what is in front of us, and our brains fill in the rest of the picture, much like a computer algorithm might, based on some less detailed sampling. If Nonmen saw in four dimensions they would deceive themselves in a completely different manner of ways, and they may even find the ways that humans deceive themselves to be incomprehensible.

And what if when ninjanjin returned to Cujara Cinmoi unaged he was not so much unaged as he was now frozen to the three dimensional sight of nonmen, they only saw him in the now because he no longer was aging, he would be just exactly the same in a year as he was now and was just the same a year ago as he was now. In stopping his aging, he became a radically different sight. He didn't just look young, the PROOF of his eternity was written in to the very nature of the nonman sight. Perhaps you could even call him an optical illusion, but seeing is believing and when CC saw NJJ he saw proof that that NJJ was not dying. whereas when CC looked at any other nonmen he would see proof that they were dying as he saw them in the future and in the past at the same time.

Now if we stop and think about this for a moment I start to see a connection to the whole concept of The Darkness that Comes Before and the paradox that Kellhus cannot handle of the Celmomian prophecy.

What if it weren't so much a prophecy, as Celmomas' nonman traits suddenly asserting themselves in the moment of his death, The way that color or light may suddenly become more intense in the last moments of human life. And with nonman four dimensional sight, he saw a few thousand years into the future, and saw the exact moment that Kellhus--glowing, btw, as he tends too--passing the exact field in which Celmomas died in Seswatha's path? If that were the case, what came before, Celmomas', determines that Kellhus will come after. (that doesn't make a lot of sense, fucking time paradoxes)

And this ties in to Akwatha as well. Nerdanel is adamant that Cleric squatting over Akka during the "Who is Mimara?" scene is incontrovertible proof that Cleric is sending False Dreams to Akka. But if this four dimensional sight is true, then Akka during a dream would be fascinating to someone who saw in four dimensions, Akka experiencing a dream, would probably look like Two completely different people to a nonman. That's gotta be interesting. And let's say the sorcery of Seswatha's mummified heart was designed by Quya, and that in fact in letting men relive seswatha's life they are actually seeing like nonmen, seeing the past at the moment they are experiencing the present. They can only do this in dreams, because their eyes are closed and the outside is closer in dreams than it is in consciousness.

also, it hints at something to do with NauCayuti as well, if he did in fact have nonman blood (was anasurimbor sire rather than ses sire) then those traits might present more in children than they do in adults (like language acquisition, the ability fades with age). So Akka might have had a true dream of NC actually asking Ses who Mimara is, because NC was seeing at that moment the future akka and ses at the same time and picked Mimara up from somewhere.

Totally crackpot, and full of holes but terribly interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chapter 7, Sakarpus

The chapter both opens an closes with a universal POV. The first part describes the logistics of the Holy War. We learn that the lands beyond Sakarpus have already been mapped by imperial trackers that are now legendary. (Xonghis of the Skin Eaters is likely such a man.) Also, a stone road is already being built that joins Sakarpus with the rest of the empire. We learn that most of the soldiers eat Scylvendi rations. It’s an enormous undertaking.

We learn that Kellhus himself has the idea to let his two “sons” befriend Sorweel. The POV quotes him, “When he becomes a brother to them, he will be a son to me.” We are left completely in the dark as to whether Kellhus actually means this. Neither Moënghus nor Kayûtas are particularly amicable, and Kellhus must know this. Also, Sorwell is paranoid and thin-skinned, yet well aware of the motivation for befriending him. So what’s Kellhus doing? Does he count on Sorweel’s antagonistic reaction? Sorweel is summoned like a servant, and by a slave! Is the encounter with Tasweer of house Ostaroot may also be a construction, though this would posit Porsparian’s complicity, which I find far-fetched. Still, they couldn’t have messed up the whole scheme to befriend Sorweel worse if they’d tried.

Kay and Moe2 and mightily entertaining. I think there is a plot hole in that Moe2 understands Sakarpic sufficiently well to make his “Because we’re wearing our breeches” quip to Sorweel’s (Skakarpic) question. There’s no reason to believe he has any facility with languages. Still… maybe he could have learned that much, in particular if Kellhus told him to. Kay is perfect, just a step below Kellhus, enough to make him human.

The scenes with Porsi show us that he’s a Yatwerian. We get the first glimpse of Weird Stuff: Porsi’s tear blisters Sorweel’s hand.

There are a few scenes concerning Sorweel’s mother (with storks) and father (who turns into beetles) that don’t give me much. Clearly, Sorweel is conflicted between his heritage and his uncharted new role. He tries to find solace in this ancestors, but it turns to ashes. (Or, as it were, beetles.)

The short chapter ends with Kellhus showing himself, in a splendidly choreographed event, to his army to start the march towards Golgotterath. Even many men of Sakarpus are joining him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unjon and Triskele

IIRC, Bakker said something like "yeah, the trees are important" in answer to a questio on the three-seas forum. Do not remember details, but someone that still has searching capability over there could maybe pull the quote

I remember asking Scott about that back on Three Seas ( I posted there as "Mithfanion" , funny to see some of the questions I posed back then come back to our discussions here). He may have answered about it in another question as well, but he made it clear to me that trees have great significance to the Nonmen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chapter 8:

“We brave the halls of Cil-Aujas.”

This chapter sets up another of the books homages, to the passage through Moria in Fellowship. There, the pass over the Carhadras is blocked, here, it’s the Ochain pass.

This is heavy authorial railroading, of course. Is Kellhus railroading this as well? Is this why Incariol is here in the first place? Because he’d know, and brave, the halls? I say “no”. Kellhus can’t manipulate the weather. He could, of course, manipulate the company of Thunyeri chieftain Feather. Perhaps there is no blizzard? Hm… but how can conspirators count on Incariol remembering, when he’s such an erratic?

The main reason to look for a deception is the chapter’s opening quote, which is about lies and deception and secrets.

Character development: Acka warms up to a company of Scalpoi called the Bitten and becomes “friends with the men the had in all likelihood killed.” The descriptive passages of men sitting around campfires are very good. We also get some insight in to Scalpoi morals with the rules of the Slog. That’s the pirate’s code in Pirates.

Mim also returns to the plot, predictably on her back. We are only allowed glimpses of her backstory in the way she handles herself among horny men, and it’s enough to turn my stomach at least. With Serwë and Mim, we now have two fully realised Bakker characters that have endured a life in sexual slavery, and with different outcomes. Where Serwë found her meaning in a complete obliteration of agency, Mim has been much stronger, and has turned exceptionally bitter, even among a cast of characters not noted for their cheerful attitudes.

Despite Bakker’s usually careful and explicit character development, I find Acka’s decision to teach her the Gnosis a bit sudden. The rules of narration would require there to be some kind of external event that effects this chance of attitude. Now, I don’t much like the rules of narration—people don’t behave like that—, but I would like Acka to justify the decision to himself. It’s quite monumental, compared to his book-long agonising of teaching the Gnosis to Kel. Of course, he is no longer a Mandate schoolman. Still, Bakker makes so many other conflicts explicit (sometimes to a fault) that I would have liked a few more pages of Acka whining.

Another thing: Bakker is a good and honest observer of men’s sexual appetite. Some of the scenes are pregnant with sexual aggression, and many of the small details (such as the gallantry of the Bitten towards Mim, the empty looks when Scalpoi commit the glimpses of Mim’s torn leggings to memory) are very precise.

Ah, and Acka gets to use the Gnosis, if only for an Odaini concussion cant and the Compass of Noshainrau. (Note “—inrau”!)

From the Arboreal perspective, this is a depressing chapter: A bunch of trees are felled by the Compass: oaks, elms, and maples. We learn that Sranc can hide in trees, apparently without the trees doing much about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there's quite a bit of authorial railroading in Akka teaching Mim the gnosis, or at least language instruction. The obvious reason to teach her more is after she demonstrates what she can do with a chorae at the end of the book, but if that were the 'big trigger' that gets Akka to teach her we'd miss out on some valuable info in the remaining Moria chapters.

And it seems pretty silly on a reread that they let snow block their path when Akka uses the gnosis to cut through the ice sealing the top of the endless stair at the end of the book. Why not use the gnosis to cut a path through the blocked path?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And it seems pretty silly on a reread that they let snow block their path when Akka uses the gnosis to cut through the ice sealing the top of the endless stair at the end of the book. Why not use the gnosis to cut a path through the blocked path?

Well, it’s a blizzard, not just a block of ice. The question is if Acka would be able to maintain a large enough ward about the whole group for the journey across the path. Similar to what he does in his second chapter, when he protects himself from rain. Lord Soter would be on his own, of course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the Arboreal perspective, this is a depressing chapter: A bunch of trees are felled by the Compass: oaks, elms, and maples. We learn that Sranc can hide in trees, apparently without the trees doing much about it.

I think we can assume these 2 facts are related.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... I would have liked a few more pages of Acka whining.

Haha, I think you're in a minority there ;)

It's the first transgression that causes the heart the most pain. As you say, he's already taught the Gnosis to Khellus without authorisation and now that he isn't a schoolman it is even more plausible that he could make this decision on a whim.

It is interesting that Akka's internal Seswatha prevented him from doing so on the first occasion via mental block, circumvented only when Kellhus inhabited Akka (i.e. 'talked directly to Seswatha'). No need for that this time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need for that this time.

I’ve thought about this, and I’m not sure. Acka hasn’t really given her any cants yet. They’re just doing grammar drills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve thought about this, and I’m not sure. Acka hasn’t really given her any cants yet. They’re just doing grammar drills.

Oh, okay. I thought she cast a Light spell... but she just 'holds it for Akka', iirc now - that would be further into CA tho too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Wolf Gate is too much to try to post on right now, so I continued the Cil Aujus chapter, I’ll come back to the Gate later.

We Nonmen... we think Earwa holy, or at least we did before time and treachery leached all the ancient concerns from our souls..”

“Earwa, holy?”

“Of course… Think on it, my mortal friend. Earwa is oblivion made manifest. And oblivion encircles us always. It is the ocean, and we are naught but silvery bubbles. It leans all about us. You see it every time you glimpse the horizon—though you know it not. In the Outside, our eyes are what blinds us. But in Earwa—in Earwa!—the line of the horizon opens… opens like a mouth… and oblivion gapes.

You must understand. For my kind, holiness begins where comprehension ends. Ignorance stakes us out , marks our limits, draws the line between us and what transcends. For us, the true God is the unknown God, the God that outruns our febrile words, our flattening thoughts…”

In this quote, I have changed “The Dark” to Earwa and “light” to Outside. I thought it was interesting to do so , because the description of being surrounded like an ocean by Oblivion, sounded to me like another way of describing the Outside. While it is perhaps a bit silly to replace The Dark, with earwa, I think it may be likely that Oblivion and Outside are related, and that the nonmen refer to the Outside as oblivion.

This raises the crackpot theory that the nonmen created Earwa or came to Earwa to shut their eyes to the outside, to create a place where they could worship ignorance; to build a monument to what they did not know; that they would make their lack of knowing something holy. They would live in darkness to demonstrate their devotion to the light. Sounds very monkish.

And beyond the silly, light and darkness. Ignorance and darkness. The darkness that comes before. No wonder Akka thinks it sounds like Kellhus. No wonder Nerdanel thinks that Mek (who is, in secret, also 10,000 other historical nonmen) founded the Dunyain.

Note that the Outside is often described as leaking into the world and that Cleric here describes the oblivion in terms of ocean. If you think about a sphere being surrounded completely, like the fruit of an orange being surround by the pith of the orange and the peel of the orange, you realize that being enveloped or suspended in water is one of the only metaphors that fully gets at how the Outside envelops the real.

Also, look how Cleric says, “our eyes are what blinds us.” And in a few pages we will find a man who has grown an eye in his heart, and confronted with the wight at the gates at the endless stair, all the men of the slog will grow eyes in their hearts. Their eyes blind them at the heart, the point where they are most vulnerable to the outside. Eyes that cannot see the world, eyes that are trying to see the outside. Blind eyes trying to watch or be watched and failing at both.

Btw, I may have to reread this utterly mammomth and gigantic cil aujus chapter again, I think Baker may be weaving a motif of eye/vision descriptors throughout this chapter. These probably have literary significance and meaning. A page later, at the section break, we begin the section with “Blinking in the bright light.”

Note that Mimara immediately associates Cleric’s sermon with Ajencis’ Dialectic. This is not the dialectic of Watcher and Watched referred to in the WLW teaser, but it is another similar dialectic. A dialectic has three parts,

Thesis --> Anti-thesis

Synthesis

(imagine the square root is a southwest pointing arrow).

Substance --> Desire

New substance

The degree to which substance of the world yields to desire determines how much the world is changed. Only sorcery changes the world and it yields a mark. Outside, desire more easily changes substance. The more outside you are, the more desire can change substance. In Earwa, the world does not yield to desire. Belief does not make reality. But in the outside, belief has more capacity as a tool. It has more force.

Watcher --> Watched

Existence

This gets you somewhat out of a solipsistic narcissism. Affirmation of who you are arises from the other. Being comes from community. Stature comes from things that are seen. Things that are unseen have less stature. The people who pray in a closet in secret are lesser than those who abase themselves in the street for all to see.

Also, a couple things here. Mimara is conditioned.

Mimara thinks, in stages, 1) Kellhus 2) she had the run of his library and was encouraged to read 3) she wanted to try to be more like her father.

Note how CLEVER Bakker is here. He is presenting Kellhus’ conditioning of Mimara obliquely, in the form of a dialectic. This just moments after Mimara has mentioned a dialectic. That the first two yield the outcome Kellhus wants, an educated Mimara (which will be attractive to Akka) and a Mimara obsessed with Akka is something the reader is being prompted by the author to see due to the structure of the text itself. Bakker without Cnaiur cannot out and out tell us that we’re seeing a Kellhus construction, he has to hide it. He can’t hide it as perfectly as Kellhus, or we’d never know, but he can give us tips and pointers. The viewpoint is from Akka, and it’s essential that Akka not believe that Mimara was sent to him by Kellhus.

Note that immediately after this revelation of Kellhus’ manipulation we have two major character events. Akka gives MImara the Surillic Point to hold (was this due to the revelation of the Judging Eye or her invoking Ajencis properly, I think it was Ajencis) and Mimara tells Akka she has the Judging Eye. It seems Mimara bringing up Ajencis’ Dialectic, something from her Kellhus inspired education, was a trigger that opened up Akka to the next stage of teaching Mimara.

Kellhus "told" her to try and be like her "father." It seems he may have planted the idea that Akka was her father rather deep, he may have also planted some sexual attraction to a father figure there, intending to lash Mimara to Akka both with filial bonds she is so desperate for, and with the myriad of physical and emotional bonds that come connected to sexual expressions as well.

At the very end of the chapter, Akka thinks of chorae as holes in existence. Due to the late hour, and the cleric sermon earlier in the chapter, I think of them now as holes in a spaceship, leading to explosive decompression. Perhaps that's what we see with sorcerous salting, the equivalent to vaccum explosively and suddenly meeting with a sealed and pressurized container that has suffered a fatal puncture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More good stuff lockesnow, but I find your lack of trees in nonman faith disturbing.

Also, I can't quite follow your reasoning on the eye-in-hearts thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that's okay, I read it again today and can't quite follow the eyes in hearts thing either. I blame posting at 1am after a full days shift and working a 12 hour sunday (only 4.5 hours of sleep sunday to monday). Honestly, I'm stunned that post has the small amount of coherence it manages. one need only look at my four-dimensional-sight posting to see what sleepdeprivation+Bakker does to my brain.

Here's what I think I was getting at.

Cleric says, "Our eyes are what blind us." A few pages later we find a man who is more or less blind, but has an eye growing in his heart.

at the end of the next Cil Aujus chapter they confront the wight. and when that happens, men of the slog begin to grow eyes in their chest.

Mimara turns to their sudden silence. In a moment of madness it seems that she can see their hearts through their caged breasts, that she can see the eyes open.

Achamian falls to his knees, clutching his chest. He looks to her in pleading horror. Lord Kosoter stumbles backward into the corridor. Some clutch their faces; others begin to shriek and scream. Soma stands riven. Sarl cackles and bawls, his eyes pinched into lines between red wrinkles.

"I can't seeeeee!" the crease-faced sergeant gibbers. "I-look-I-look-I-look ..."

As for the other stuff I wrote, I"m really not sure. I tried to have another go at it, and just wound up confusing myself more. I don't think I have a firm enough grasp on the metaphysics to really grok what I sort of intuit is happening with the eyes and what they mean in terms of watching, seeing, and their connection to the outside. It made sense at the time. :P

also, I don't think that Wacher->Watched->Existence works as a dialectic. doh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven’t gotten that far in my re-read, but let me chime in on the hearts:

Claim: The heart of man is the part of the physical body that is closest to the Outside. To the extent that man’s soul resides anywhere (physically, in our bodies), it’s in the heart.

Elaboration: Our souls are pinpricks in the outside. They are connected to each other. (This is how the cants of calling work, for example.) This pinprick resides, physically, in our hearts. The shortest distance between two men, metaphysically, is through their hearts: Heart1 -> SomewhereOutside -> SomewhereElseOutside -> Heart2. Since the Outside is pliable, it’s easier to navigate if you know what you’re doing.

Remember that I believe that the Outside has location, so two souls in the Outside can be at different places. Location in the Outside tracks location in the Inside, but it‘s not distance-preserving (it’s a homeomorphism, but not an isometry). However, “close” souls (such as Sammy and Little Kelmo) would be physically close in the Outside. Kellhus’s soul is physically close to Esmi’s when he speaks “through” her. And it’s extremely close to Serwë’s when she dies for him.

This explains the scene where Kellhus rips Serwë’s heart out of his own ribcage, for example. It would have been harder to rip, say, Serwë’s left eye out of his own skull (because hearts, not eyes, are the connecting points). It would have been harder to rip, say, Acka’s heart out (because Acka’s soul isn’t so close in the Outside.) And it would have been impossible to rip out the heart of the thing called Sarcellus, because he doesn’t even have a soul.

So far, so good. I think this is correct.

(The location-based argument also neatly explains why Sammy and Kelmo don’t want to be separated. They are almost one soul on the Outside, and their corresponding bodies don’t want to be ripped apart. Much like the physical pain that people feel in Pullman’s world when they’re separated from their little animals. It also solves the mystery of souls being damned in one place of Eärwa but not another, such as sorcerers being holy in Shimeh but damned in the Nansurium.)

What I can’t quite wrap my head around now is why the eyes, but I think I’m close. Allow me to ramble.

Clearly, normal eyes feed irrelevant sensory information to the brain, if your main interest is the Outside. Nonmen feel blinded by them. The Cishaurim go so far as to rip them out. I assume that the Third Sight is some kind of “looking through the Outside”, the soul literally apprehends other souls as per their representation in the topology of the Outside, rather than the physical Inside. For example, the Cishaurim can see Kellhus over long distances, he shines in the third sight.

What happens in a topos? The distance between Outside and Inside is even shorter than it normally is. The soul wants to see. (I don’t know why. I think we’re getting closer—it‘s the No-God’s desire to see, the “circle between watcher and watched”.) Maybe the Outside-soul wants to see what’s going on in the Inside. Maybe the Inside-sould wants to see what’s going on in the Outside. Maybe both. No matter what, the desire so see, by virtue of the malleability of the Outside, physically manifests an eye. Where is this eye created? At the easiest place: the shortest distance to the (already close) Outside: the location of the heart.

So what happens to the Skin Eaters is that the normal, skull-based eyes are shut off (to remove the “noise”) and a new eye forms in the physical place that is closest to the highly malleable Outside: the heart.

That’s all I’ve got.

It would follow that if you enter a topos and really, really desire A Dance With Dragons to come out, the book would physically manifest in your ribcage. And your twin or soulmate could rip it out of his own ribcage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clearly, normal eyes feed irrelevant sensory information to the brain, if your main interest is the Outside. Nonmen feel blinded by them. The Cishaurim go so far as to rip them out. I assume that the Third Sight is some kind of "looking through the Outside", the soul literally apprehends other souls as per their representation in the topology of the Outside, rather than the physical Inside. For example, the Cishaurim can see Kellhus over long distances, he shines in the third sight.

My impression upon a reread is that the Third Sight is a concept that has such been named by the faction within the Cishaurim that Moe leads. He has started preaching to them about the Logos, and those that now believe that they apprehend the Logos believe it to be a new third way of seeing with their blind seeing as their "second sight."

ETA: Like, the one who shows up and tells Kellhus that he is one of possessors of the Third Sight would tell you that not all of the Cishaurim possess the Third Sight, though he probably wouldn't share this with Seokti.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, I think the single most damning thing about Sarl is that he is laughing at the pain of the eye opening in his heart. Skin Spies laugh at pain, right?

I like what Happy Ent is saying, it is sort of what I was trying to wrap my head around and failing.

It's also interesting to note that eyes are sort of instruments/appendages/part-of the brain. I think Bakker is sort of playing with something there, an irony that eyes are connected to intellect, intellect is not necessarily connected to the soul (soul is in the heart, intellect in the brain) but that the soul is trying to open an eye in the heart when eyes are often decieving both the soul and the intellect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×