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Ckram

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  1. The link makes the video jump to it's end, starting at 1h32m14s mark, when Elio states exactly what you remember he did. Then I guess it's both safe and accurate.
  2. Here's the video in question.
  3. Ckram

    Hardhome theories?

    I don't remember this being established by any source. Do you have a quote to support that?
  4. Ckram

    Hardhome theories?

    I was about to start a thread about it. The first time Hardhome appears on the map is in ASOS, but is only mentioned in text in ADWD.. Storrold's Point is depicted as a peninsula with no forest so far as ADWD (both on Richard Geiger's and Jeffrey L. Ward's maps). I always thought that this was not intentional and had to do with creating space in the paper to insert the names of the peninsula and the ruin. However, I had a big surprise when TLOIAF illustrator, Jonathan Roberts, stated that he had to make changes in his Beyond-the-Wall map to justify the wights attacking on Hardhome: "One small inconsistency between this and the original maps in the books is that the forest reaches out along Storrold’s Point all the way to Hardhome. This was changed to be consistent with the army of the dead pouring out of the Haunted Forest to assault Hardhome" So it seems to me that Storrold's Point was specially designed to be a place where the wildlings would be cornered by the dead hordes from the beginning. Hardhome's background seems to have been created to emphasize that in a recent era (recent enough for NW to have reliable records), the wildlings thought they had the perfect plan to thrive, and became to confident. But not only were they surprised by an attack by land, but especially never expected to be surrounded also by sea. The large-scale forest fire seems to me to demonstrate how desperate the inhabitants of Hardhome were when they were completelly surrounded, on all sides, which in the end must have made the fire turned against themselves. In short, Hardhome's story strikes me as a cautionary tale. "Always expect the WW, even from the sea".
  5. Ckram

    The were-wood hypothesis

    It's an amazonian legend. Watch a brief video about it here. That's nice. I meant it like in 'they can take human form'.
  6. Ckram

    The were-wood hypothesis

    That's the popular idea.
  7. Ckram

    Jon's dream in ADwD

    It's possible. However: The morning NW men found the corpses of Othor and Jafer Flowers was "unnaturally warm", and yet Dywen noted that there was "no corpse stink" and Sam stated "they aren't rotting". And then "the rangers exchanged glances; they could see it was true, every man of them". And both corpses already had unnatural blue eyes, meaning the Others already rose them by that time. Regarding Jafer Flower's still-moving hand that decomposed in a jar during Alliser Thorne's trip to King's Landing, that jar was filled with vinegar ("His right hand was floating in a jar of vinegar back in Maester Aemon's tower." - AGOT, Jon VII). So, maybe it decomposed due the southern heat, maybe it was a month in contact with the acetic acid of the vinegar.
  8. Ckram

    The were-wood hypothesis

    I see. That's nice.
  9. This SSM makes me think there is: Who would win in a fight, Barristan Selmy or Arthur Dayne (in their best days)? Dayne... if he was armed with Dawn. If both men had equivalent weaponry, it might be a toss-up. (http://www.westeros.org/Citadel/SSM/Entry/5601)
  10. Ckram

    Jon's dream in ADwD

    Is it? I don't know. Coldhands doesn't seems to be rotting. Anyway, if he rots is for the better. GRRM has said he doesn't like people coming back from the dead more powerful.
  11. Ckram

    Jon's dream in ADwD

    @kissdbyfire Of course, this is also possible. But I would not bet that this is a premonitory, divinatory dream. In which what you see is what you will get. Because, you know, Ygritte is in it, then I think it's all simbolic, even the armor. @The First Bloodrider that's right.
  12. Ckram

    Jon's dream in ADwD

    The main issue with this armor is not that it's made of ice but that it's black. As @kissdbyfire noticed, the armor of the other is not like that. So let's not close our eyes to the fact that this armor is not literal armor. My interpretation is that this is a symbolic armor. Made of ice, in the sense that Jon would have been picked up by the Others as a wight, so Jon will be one of them and have their powers (mainly to resist the extreme cold of the WWs). Black, because Jon, despite being a ice wight, would still be fighting against the dead, in accordance with the principles and vows of the Night's Watch. Jon Coldhands. Lol
  13. Ckram

    The were-wood hypothesis

    @SiSt, @The Weirwoods Eyes, @kissdbyfire, thanks for the answers. I was well aware of the meaning of "weir" as in "dam." In the books translated into my language the name wierwood is something like damwood, and I consider it a successful translation case. However, I am trying to focus on the other meaning of the expression, in the sense that "weirwood = werewood" would imply that white trees could have shapeshifting habilities, such as a werewolf or lychanthrope. As a non-native speaker, I do not usually bet that the solutions to the book mysteries are hidden behind English ambiguities, wordplays, and puns. They may be, I just do not like the idea they are - especially since foreign versions would never succeed make a satisfactory translation. However, in this case, the unfolding is indeed interesting, regardless of the linguistic question. In fact, if weirwood are lycanthrope plants, it would mean that they once had the human form, or even that it has the ability to take human form even now. As for the first scenario, I have in mind a South American indigenous legend about a species of tree that would have first sprouted from the body of a woman murdered for having relations with a warrior from an enemy tribe. As for the second scenario, I imagine that a weirwood that takes the human form would be a kind of monstrous hecatoncheir, or a single human body with thousands of minds. Following this same line of thinking, I wonder if martial pines and sentinel trees also would not be plants capable of assuming a mammalian form, or even if they were people in the past and now are "resting" in a tree shape. In short, it leads me to think the Old Gods may actually have existed and become trees. And that the green men of the Isle of Faces may have turned into the very weirwoods on the island, but can come back to human if somebody or something "wakes" them.
  14. I was doing a search about language in ASOIAF when I came across this: "The mysterious ‘Weirwood trees’ are at the heart of the religion (known as ‘the Old Gods’) still present in the north of Westeros with their sap-bleeding faces linking them to the supernatural or religious. The weir- prefix could be an echo of weirwolf (an alternate spelling of werewolf, dating back to 1818)" -- https://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2012/04/03/the-language-of-game-of-thrones/ I did some research and found that the "were" on "werewolf" is old english for "man" (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/werewolf). So, dear native english speakers: Is this a thing? Or would it be nonsensical to even wonder if the weirwood could be some kind of "lycanthrope" trees (grammatically speaking, of course)?
  15. In his site, Jonathan Roberts stated that his first step on Braavos was "to establish the overhead plan for the map". then this plan was "spun round and a perspective distort added" and only after that he "started working in all of the buildings and other elevations". At first glance, nothing new here. However, Braavos illustration in TLOIAF contemplates both the spun plan (larger map) and the overhead (smaller map). And I found out that they bear somes differences. He/she who compares the larger map with the overhead plan will notice that Roberts intended them to be identical. In deed, even uninhabited and unimportant islands were reproduced with care and their disposition is very similar in both maps. So the differences I found seem to be the result of changes in the main map that were simply not updated in the smaller map. However, they are so noteworthy that they seem to increase the significance of what has been fixed. First, the island in which the Sealord's Gardens are located (zoomed image) doesn't exist in the overhead plan. Second, neither the House of Black and White and the Sept Beyond the Sea (zoomed image). The first case (Sealord's Garden) is one that I've already explored upthread and this inconsistency between the original overhead plan and the final larger map only enforces my suspicions that it was a result of George's later interventions. However, I now also see that someone (probably GRRM again) must also have stepped in to fix the location of HoBaW and SBtS, and I wonder if it'd have something to do with the tunnel network whose extension was theorized above.
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