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What If Bronn's Last Name is...REYNE?!!?!?

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I've been doing a lot of thinking about Bronn lately.

In fact, since Season 7 has ended, I have started a thread about the possibility that Bronn is the father of Cersei's baby, and now I've begun re-watching the series, starting from Season One, and the more I think about Bronn the more I think he is NOT what he simply seems to be.

Consider:

(1)  Bronn is VERY mysterious and evasive about his past.  There are AT LEAST two scenes (and maybe more) when the subject comes up, and Bronn is very evasive both times.  The first is when Tywin meets the Hill Tribes (Shagga, Timmet, et al.), introductions are being made, and Bronn is evasive about who his father is.  The second time is when Tyrion, Shae and Bronn are playing the drinking game, and once again  Bronn is very evasive.  (There might be even more instances in the series, too, I don't recall offhand, but I am watching the series again, and will take note if there are)

(2)  Bronn basically appears from nowhere, and attaches himself to the party travelling to the Eyrie for entirely unknown reasons.   Think about it.  We first see Bronn at the inn when Cat takes Tyrion captive.  Bronn is sitting there, Tyrion is told all the rooms are taken, Tyrion basically offers money for a room, Bronn accepts, and Tyrion tosses him a coin.  Cat then makes a big show of identifying the people in the room loyal to the Tullys (Bronn is not one of them), and Tyrion is taken captive.  End episode.  Next episode, next time we see them, Cat and Tyrion (and others) are headed to the Eyrie, and Bronn is with them.  Why??  Who knows?  Is he now loyal to Tyrion or Cat?  Neither seems plausible.  Tyrion is a captive, quite likely about to be executed, and if Bronn is loyal to Cat and is being paid by Cat, then WHY does Bronn agree to be Tyrion's champion in the trial by combat, while Cat says nothing to object?  Frankly, it all strikes me as fairly odd.

(3) Bronn is VERY competent and capable.  VERY.  So much so, in fact, that I'd say , for a "fiction" story, he is at "major character" levels.  He is a VERY good fighter, very stealthy, and has great survival instincts and abilities.   In a "fiction" story, that leads me to believe he is more than he seems, but in the case of Bronn...what does that mean?

(4)  As I mentioned, I have another thread where I lay out the case for Bronn being the father of Cersei's baby.  I won't go through it all here, but one implication of this is MAJOR betrayal of BOTH Tyrion AND Jaime.  Now, WHO would have motivation to screw over and betray and disrupt the Lannisters in such a radical  way?

So I wondered and I thought about it, and concluded the answer could be...the last surviving member of House Reyne.

Yes, House Reyne, as in "The Rains of Castamere."   It is believed that Tywin Lannister wiped them out to the last man, but how likely is that?  This was a major house.  How likely is it that every single one of them was there when it happened, and every single one of them was killed??

Now, I'm guessing some people are thinking "But wait, Bronn has saved Jaime and Tyrion's lives several times!"  Yes, that's true.  But this would not be the first time in fiction that a character has a long, twisted plot of revenge, to make people suffer rather than to quickly and simply kill them and be done with it.

So, I guess I'm adding to my Bronn "deep plot" theory, and postulating not only that he is the father of Cersei's child, but also that he is the last surviving member of House Reyne.

Your thoughts?

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21 hours ago, Cron said:

Frankly, it all strikes me as fairly odd.

Nice analysis, never thought about how Bronn joined the party before. 

21 hours ago, Cron said:

In a "fiction" story, that leads me to believe he is more than he seems, but in the case of Bronn...what does that mean?

You are right, Bronn is a more important character than it superficially seems. Important in all seasons since his first appearance. Very able, very evasive. Yes, Bronn being somewhat very important, is an interesting approach.

21 hours ago, Cron said:

where I lay out the case for Bronn being the father of Cersei's baby.

Very unlikely, though. Cersei in bed with Bronn? Not her type of man, is it? She was with Jaime and with the young Lannister cousin. But crude Bronn? Also the movies gave no indication at all and that would be a disappointing "rabbit out of the hat" revelation. Cersei and Jamie had sex with each other regularly since his return, so the fathership is either unclear (if she had more than one lover) or it is Jamie.

As to House Reyne... no idea. Can be or not. What implication do you see there? 

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I like the idea though Bronn's lower class attitudes would become a lie if he was noble born - and they are an important aspect of his character. Why not make him a Bastard of House Reyne?

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1 minute ago, Zapho said:

Why not make him a Bastard of House Reyne?

Agreed. Or a bastard of any other important house?

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16 hours ago, Cron said:

I've been doing a lot of thinking about Bronn lately.

In fact, since Season 7 has ended, I have started a thread about the possibility that Bronn is the father of Cersei's baby, and now I've begun re-watching the series, starting from Season One, and the more I think about Bronn the more I think he is NOT what he simply seems to be.

Consider:

(1)  Bronn is VERY mysterious and evasive about his past.  There are AT LEAST two scenes (and maybe more) when the subject comes up, and Bronn is very evasive both times.  The first is when Tywin meets the Hill Tribes (Shagga, Timmet, et al.), introductions are being made, and Bronn is evasive about who his father is.  The second time is when Tyrion, Shae and Bronn are playing the drinking game, and once again  Bronn is very evasive.  (There might be even more instances in the series, too, I don't recall offhand, but I am watching the series again, and will take note if there are)

(2)  Bronn basically appears from nowhere, and attaches himself to the party travelling to the Eyrie for entirely unknown reasons.   Think about it.  We first see Bronn at the inn when Cat takes Tyrion captive.  Bronn is sitting there, Tyrion is told all the rooms are taken, Tyrion basically offers money for a room, Bronn accepts, and Tyrion tosses him a coin.  Cat then makes a big show of identifying the people in the room loyal to the Tullys (Bronn is not one of them), and Tyrion is taken captive.  End episode.  Next episode, next time we see them, Cat and Tyrion (and others) are headed to the Eyrie, and Bronn is with them.  Why??  Who knows?  Is he now loyal to Tyrion or Cat?  Neither seems plausible.  Tyrion is a captive, quite likely about to be executed, and if Bronn is loyal to Cat and is being paid by Cat, then WHY does Bronn agree to be Tyrion's champion in the trial by combat, while Cat says nothing to object?  Frankly, it all strikes me as fairly odd.

(3) Bronn is VERY competent and capable.  VERY.  So much so, in fact, that I'd say , for a "fiction" story, he is at "major character" levels.  He is a VERY good fighter, very stealthy, and has great survival instincts and abilities.   In a "fiction" story, that leads me to believe he is more than he seems, but in the case of Bronn...what does that mean?

(4)  As I mentioned, I have another thread where I lay out the case for Bronn being the father of Cersei's baby.  I won't go through it all here, but one implication of this is MAJOR betrayal of BOTH Tyrion AND Jaime.  Now, WHO would have motivation to screw over and betray and disrupt the Lannisters in such a radical  way?

So I wondered and I thought about it, and concluded the answer could be...the last surviving member of House Reyne.

Yes, House Reyne, as in "The Rains of Castamere."   It is believed that Tywin Lannister wiped them out to the last man, but how likely is that?  This was a major house.  How likely is it that every single one of them was there when it happened, and every single one of them was killed??

Now, I'm guessing some people are thinking "But wait, Bronn has saved Jaime and Tyrion's lives several times!"  Yes, that's true.  But this would not be the first time in fiction that a character has a long, twisted plot of revenge, to make people suffer rather than to quickly and simply kill them and be done with it.

So, I guess I'm adding to my Bronn "deep plot" theory, and postulating not only that he is the father of Cersei's child, but also that he is the last surviving member of House Reyne.

Your thoughts?

First off, may I just say, this obsession you have with Bronn is wild! lol  You have really dedicated a lot of thought recently to this cat...

You and I have gone back and forth with the whole Bronn being Cersei's baby daddy, which I disagree with, but that's neither nor there.  That said, let me address this new theory of yours.  I do not think Bronn is a Reyne.  Looking at the lineage of House Reyne and Tarbeck, IF he was anything, he'd be a Tarbeck. It'd make the most sense that he would be the last Lord of Tarbeck, son of Rohanne Tarbeck who was born in 258 AD, and is said to have disappeared during the Reyne-Tarbeck Rebellion, which is of course when Tywin had Houses Reyne and Tarbeck eliminated.  It was rumored a knight threw the 3 year old down a well, which of course is similar to Aegon baby #1 having his head smashed into a wall, thus unrecognizable, thus not being able to confirm the identity for certain. Bronn is thought to have been born in 264 AD, possibly as late as 268.  That puts him 6-10 years out of range for that, but it's not out of the realm of possibility.  But I still think it's highly unlikely.

So to address your points, we have to look at the book as well as the show.  I will use some of both, especially since the show has only touched on those defunct houses once or twice in passing, if at all.  So here we go:

(1) You say he is mysterious about his past, but I don't know about that.  Through Bronn, we have learned he was low born to abusive parents.  He learned the intricacies of how death works at age 5, killed a woman before age 12 (in self-defense) and that he has been beyond the Wall before. Him telling Tywin that Tywin would not have known his father is not evasive in my opinion, more so dismissive of Tywin's inquiry.

(2) Bronn didn't appear out of nowhere.  He was staying at the Crossroads Inn and dining when the confrontation between Cat and Tyrion happens.  Cat asks the men in the hall to capture Tyrion and escort them to the Eyrie.  In the show, Bronn is alone when he offers to sell his room to Tyrion, before Cat and Ser Rodrick take him. Afterwards, Bronn  goes along in hopes of being rewarded by Cat for the escort.  He just happens to befriend Tyrion along the way. In the books, Bronn is there with another sellsword, who later dies in the attack from a mountain clan. In the books Tyrion notes that Bronn and Chiggen (the other sellsword) only came to Catelyn's aid because they were sellswords and were hoping for a reward. 

(3) I agree Bronn is considered a major character, but on the same level as Poddrick.  Basically, these are rags-to-riches stories, in my opinion.  He is definitely an accomplished fighter/warrior with a lot of survival skills.  But so was Daario.  I think with Bronns character, it is obvious that his skills were developed through the hardships he faced through his life.  Bronn's fighting skills, outlook on life, views regarding honor, etc, point to a guy who has had to overcome a lot in life and had to make his own way.  Much like a Brit's accent can typically tell you whether someone was "high born" or "low born" i.e. Oxford/RP vs Cockney, the same generally applies to what you hear in GoT.  Bronn's accent is specifically closer to Cockney English, as opposed to Sansa or Sam, who sound more "proper". 

Bronn appears to despise high borns to a certain extent for much of the show.  Even when he starts to hobknob with the high borns, he more relishes in the fact that he holds any power over other "proper lads" as we see when he is Lord Commander of the City's Watch, or when he razzes Dickon Tarley about his name and "fancy lad school".  He strikes me more of someone who gets his kicks messing busting the balls of high borns, rather than pretending not to be one, all for this super elaborate revenge scheme.

Anyways, that's just how I see it.  But who knows...

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5 hours ago, Jaehaerys Stark said:

I agree Bronn is considered a major character, but on the same level as Poddrick.

Agreed (and with most of the rest of your points, too).

Also, like Podrick, Bronn is a more major character on the show than in the books. And it seems to be mostly because Jerome Flynn hit it out of the park, the fans responded, so D&D decided to expand his role.

So, his large role in the show isn't much of a sign that he has some secret, important background that GRRM had planned for him.

And this doesn't seem like the kind of thing D&D would add. I can't think of any other characters who they did anything like this with—even when they radically changed Jeyne Westerling into Talisa Maegyr and gave her a whole new backstory, that backstory didn't lead to any big reveals later in the story.

Also, his rags-to-riches story is, I think, there for a good reason. One big theme in ASoIaF is examining the aspects of feudal societies that most faux-medieval fantasies ignore. Fantasies often give their heroes or sidekicks rags-to-riches stories, but they're usually pretty unrealistic. In real feudal societies, the opportunities usually only arise in the midst of chaotic and horrible times, when the system is failing, and far more people are losing status (and/or dying) at the same time. And it's usually amoral guys like Bronn who profit, not storybook heroes. Bronn doesn't care that he rises as (and because) the world goes to hell. Taking that away by making him a secret noble who always "deserved" it would weaken his story.

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I agree with most of @Jaehaerys Stark and @falcotron said here.  Personally I think it is a huge crackpot tinfoil stretch to imagine Bronn as anything more than what he has thus far presented himself to be, but I admire the effort and find the post interesting.  If Bronn really was a Reyne I believe he would have had his vengeance on the Lannisters already given all of the opportunities he has had.  Hell, he could have just let Tyrion and Jaime die a million times by now and with Tywin gone there is no need for a greater masterplan "fuck you" to send to the Lannisters other than killing them.  Also, in the books he usurps the title of Lord Stokeworth, threatening Falyse, and then names Lollys' bastard (who he is taking as his own) after Tyrion - that reeks of being a middle finger to the high born (and Cersei) in general, not of being a secret vengeance seeking Reyne.

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18 hours ago, Jaehaerys Stark said:

about his name and "fancy lad school".  He strikes me more of someone who gets his kicks messing busting the balls of high borns, rather than pretending not to be one, all for this super elaborate revenge scheme.

Agreed. Fully. Bronn is not high-born.

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:lol: yeah, @Jaehaerys Stark has a good point about your obsession with Bronn. 

If i have to sign up for a crackpot Bronn theory this would be it though (Jaime fathered Cersei's alleged baby and Tyene is dead). But in all seriousness, no. 

Bronn is just an able and smart commoner with a great skill set who knows his best interest. In the show he represents the ultimate comic relief sidekick and is sometimes a plot device. In the books he is the embodiment of the concept of "sellsword". I love Bronn, but he is just a sellsword. If he were anything more, it would destroy his character. 

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23 hours ago, RhaenysB said:

:lol: yeah, @Jaehaerys Stark has a good point about your obsession with Bronn. 

If i have to sign up for a crackpot Bronn theory this would be it though (Jaime fathered Cersei's alleged baby and Tyene is dead). But in all seriousness, no. 

Bronn is just an able and smart commoner with a great skill set who knows his best interest. In the show he represents the ultimate comic relief sidekick and is sometimes a plot device. In the books he is the embodiment of the concept of "sellsword". I love Bronn, but he is just a sellsword. If he were anything more, it would destroy his character. 

That's how I feel about it.  He's a rags-to-riches feel good character that we are all rooting for.  He provides comedy relief, comes through with the clutch saves and as mentioned, a capable plot device.  No secrets surrounding this guy though...

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I'm pretty sure Bronn just knows how to follow the money.

Tyrion has enough cash to buy out his room, then Cat exposes him as a rich Lannister? That had to have activated Bronn's almonds.

Then factor in that Tyrion is clearly in need of physical assistance. Bronn is very good at "physical assistance". Shit, how can Bronn pass that up?

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Bronn sniffs money out... this is what i believe to be the true answer. He saw the imp Lannister throwing money about and saw the opportunity to get in with him... remember a Lannister always pays their debts so he knew he would always be paid for whatever he did for him.

But the idea of him being a Reyne be it bastard or legitimate is a nice idea.... How about him being a bastard lannister ?

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Here's the thing - if this was to be true, Broon as a character is fundamentally destroyed.

He's not anyone of importance. He's a commoner sell sword, good with a blade and sharp of tongue but he has no wealth or lands or grand game to play - his personal stakes in everything going around him are as low or as high as the amount he's being paid. That sort of low born, detached approach makes him the closest thing the audience has to a direct vehicle into Westeros and the events of the story. 

He's a great character because you know everything you need to know about him from the minute he steps on the screen.

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