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DominusNovus

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About DominusNovus

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  1. I meant to ask for the specific quote, but I found it. Anyway, I still don’t find the quote quite as definitive as it could be. Is Ned thinking of teenaged Robert? Or is he thinking of King Robert? Or both?
  2. Do we know that he'd swear his undying love for some woman and then forget her?
  3. I really don’t know how well that analogy works, but I’m picturing Cersei as a car that doesn’t let you drive her, and occasionally tries to run you over. And I chuckle.
  4. How many pages of characterization do we have for Lyanna, in the entire series?
  5. DominusNovus

    The Night’s Watch and the Gift(s) don’t make sense

    I think we’re talking at cross purposes here, then.
  6. DominusNovus

    The Night’s Watch and the Gift(s) don’t make sense

    More or less, but largely from the perspective that the Gift should be better populated (though I do think Westeros has a high enough population that the Watch should be far higher, even if its just a glorified penal colony, but thats not my argument here). Ultimately, it boils down to feudal obligations: those imposed on the inhabitants of the gift are preferable to those imposed by their neighbors in the North, and they’re sworn to neutrality theough the wars of the realm. Therefore, the population should be higher. We get hints that the North has seen better days in general (note that parts of Winterfell are abandoned), but not that its on particularly hard times, prior to the Wot5K. Meanwhile, we get indications that the Gift is all but abandoned, with empty strongholds (the last places to be abandoned, logically). To me, it should be the reverse. Additional thought: Hell, every time a war starts, the contrast should be even more people running to the Gift. Imagine your a small freeholding farmer in the North, and your local lord comes by to tell you that his lord has called his banners because his lord has called his banners because the Targaryens are fighting somebody. The men of fighting age in your area are expected to head south for a year or more, especially those with skill at arms. This war is not a secret, and you know that the Wildlings will find out and pick up their raids long before the survivors get back. During wartime, its the imhabitant south of the Gift that should be more vulnerable to raids - their neighbors living under the rule of the Watch don’t have to send men south to fight.
  7. DominusNovus

    The Night’s Watch and the Gift(s) don’t make sense

    That is a possibility, but it doesn’t make much sense. It seems like a lot of work and it does seem to contradict the implications of places like Moletown and Queenscrown, where there is clearly a population that is not part of the Watch. Plus, just think of how difficult it would be to enforce the vows of Stewards living that far away from the Wall.
  8. DominusNovus

    The Night’s Watch and the Gift(s) don’t make sense

    Absolutely a valid point, that it is not likely to be the Lords directly sworn to House Stark that would be running around trying to stop the raiders, but the local landed masterly/knightly houses. However, I'm not sure that the Watch doesn't have the same, in theory. We know that there are strongholds in the Gift, surely someone must have holding them. Thats what the clincher is for me: Say you're a skilled warrior, and you can get some land in the North. Your options are to be sworn to a Northern Lord, who will expect tax and military service from you, on top of having to defend your lands from Wildlings, or to be sworn to the Night's Watch, who will expect tax and no military service from you, but you'll still have to defend against Wildlings. Maybe the Watch demands such higher tribute than a traditional lord? But that doesn't make sense, since there's so few of them - it would seem to be a self regulating problem, if its a question of duties: the lower the numbers of the Night's Watch, the less that they'll demand in tribute of those that live in the Gift, and the more attractive it is to live there. Conversely, even if they don't demand less, then the Watch is sitting on an excess of tribute, that they can sell, and make the Watch richer, which improves its situation. Now, perhaps the Night's Watch didn't like the idea of landed warriors living on the Gift for whatever reason. That may have been the case prior to the Targ era, but surely New Gift was settled no differently than the rest of the North, so the Watch would have just ended up with masterly houses sworn to them, maybe even some petty lords. Unless we assume that, upon being given the New Gift, the Watch kicked out every masterly and noble house in the Gift. That seems counter productive, at minimum, to me. I think it would make more sense if they just kept the status quo. "You use to be sworn to House Umber, now you're sworn to the Night's Watch." Not to mention that the landed nobility and masterly houses are both the military and bureaucracy of a feudal society; get rid of them, and who is going to collect the tribute? Its just a knot that, the more I pull at it, the more it just doesn't quite add up.
  9. DominusNovus

    The Night’s Watch and the Gift(s) don’t make sense

    Because you’re picking at the examples, rather than the actual position. Thats rabbit hole territory, which gets us sucked down into debating how bad a winter has to be for the Trident to freeze over.
  10. DominusNovus

    The Night’s Watch and the Gift(s) don’t make sense

    I’m using an example, not changing my argument.
  11. DominusNovus

    The Night’s Watch and the Gift(s) don’t make sense

    Here’s the way I see it: wildling raids are a problem. But so is ‘normal’ warfare within the Seven Kingdoms. Just look at the Riverlands, there’s a place that gets ravaged by warfare continually, and its just politically divided, not a depopulated region (though it certainly could support a far higher population than it does). The wildling raids are, by necessity, small attacks. They’re not large expeditions, like what Tywin does to the Riverlands. The way I see it, there’s nothing in particular special about the land just south of the border between the Umber lands and the Gift. Yes, nominally, you’re under Lord Umber’s protection if you’re south of that border, but what is Lord Umber going to do a bout a raid? By the time he can respond, from further south, the Wildlings are not only long gone, they’re probably back across the Wall. In exchange for this nominal protection, you owe him both military service in some distant war (every war for you is a distant one, unless the Wildlings have moved in force past the Wall) and some form of tax. Meanwhile, just north of that border, you’re under the protection of the Night’s Watch, which is between your lands and the raiders, so they’re better positioned to have a chance at intercepting them. They’re also not going to call you up for military service.
  12. DominusNovus

    The Night’s Watch and the Gift(s) don’t make sense

    I’m operating under the assumption that the population at large assumes the Wall and Watch are just there for protection against the Wildlings and probably have for a period far longer than the Targaryen dynasty has ruled.
  13. DominusNovus

    The Night’s Watch and the Gift(s) don’t make sense

    Or some people enjoy details and verisimilitude.
  14. DominusNovus

    The Night’s Watch and the Gift(s) don’t make sense

    You’re trying to shift the discussion from a discussion of math to a discussion of magic, and working in insults for good measure. I don’t know why, since this fandom debates troop numbers and their plausibility all the time. You’re adding nothing to the conversation. I get that you view every discussion from a purely Doylist perspective and either cannot or refuse to discuss the material from any other, but it still adds nothing.
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