Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

One-eyed Misbehavin

Qyburn's abomination

Recommended Posts

Assuming  The mountain that rides is "ser" Robert strong (not any other 8 feet tall men that fell into Qyburns dungeons) why did Qyburn name him after such a (formerly) famous house. Lots of people who read this series have also read  The Princess and the queen,  and we know that breakbones strong (or broken-bones as  mushroom so "hilariously" dubbed him)  was probably (was certainly) the father of Rhaenyra's  first set of children 

My point being.....  Why  give him the surname strong which  A clever character  with a good knowledge of history such as Tyrion  would so easily relate to the dance with dragons?  And he would also know that the curse of harrenhall  certainly lived up to the hype  on the strong house and took the lives of many from the family (if not all of them)

 My only guess is that the Strongs died out (or grew so small/scattered) so it would be hard to find some other Strong to validate his birth/knighthood 

I know that in-universe pretty much everyone knows who Robert Strong is. I'm just simply asking why Qyburn chose Strong instead of passing him off as a Dunk-Like Hedge Knight and saying someone dead (say Amory Lorch) knighted him? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Imho; because he's strong.

Sometimes things can be simple.

The real question is why call him "Robert" when Cersei would likely have an aversion to that name. Does he have King Robert's head? (I don't think the timeline would work out?) Or Robb's?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, One-eyed Misbehavin said:

Assuming  The mountain that rides is "ser" Robert strong (not any other 8 feet tall men that fell into Qyburns dungeons) why did Qyburn name him after such a (formerly) famous house. Lots of people who read this series have also read  The Princess and the queen,  and we know that breakbones strong (or broken-bones as  mushroom so "hilariously" dubbed him)  was probably (was certainly) the father of Rhaenyra's  first set of children 

My point being.....  Why  give him the surname strong which  A clever character  with a good knowledge of history such as Tyrion  would so easily relate to the dance with dragons?  And he would also know that the curse of harrenhall  certainly lived up to the hype  on the strong house and took the lives of many from the family (if not all of them)

 My only guess is that the Strongs died out (or grew so small/scattered) so it would be hard to find some other Strong to validate his birth/knighthood 

I know that in-universe pretty much everyone knows who Robert Strong is. I'm just simply asking why Qyburn chose Strong instead of passing him off as a Dunk-Like Hedge Knight and saying someone dead (say Amory Lorch) knighted him? 

I have always wondered about the curious name Robert Strong. Robert seems to be, short of Tyrion, the worst name Qyburn could have chosen for him.

Stong is an interesting name. An 8 foot tall knight from a previously believed extinct house is strange indeed.

i wonder if Harrenhall plays a roll

House Strong made its seat at Harrenhall

Gregor held Harrenhall as well

 

tough to say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Qyburn might just not be very original with the naming. But if when people think of the name Strong they think of breakbones, I could see that being what Qyburn wants them to think. 

But more than anything, I don't think Qyburn really gives a shit if anyone has doubts as to who ser Strong is. Who's going to say anything?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Orphalesion said:

Does he have King Robert's head? (I don't think the timeline would work out?) Or Robb's?

I don't think either of them would have been in any state do be used. If It's not Gregor's head, I think it'll be one of those poor souls given over to Qyburn for parts. Maybe more than one somehow grafted together to support the massive helmet. I mean, he's got to have some sort of sensory organs to be able to move around and hear and see and stuff, and I don't know why Qyburn would lie to Cersei and say he sent his head off when he didn't. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, YOVMO said:

I have always wondered about the curious name Robert Strong. Robert seems to be, short of Tyrion, the worst name Qyburn could have chosen for him.

Stong is an interesting name. An 8 foot tall knight from a previously believed extinct house is strange indeed.

i wonder if Harrenhall plays a roll

House Strong made its seat at Harrenhall

Gregor held Harrenhall as well

 

tough to say.

I meant to add this when I brought up Harren's curse. Thank you good catch, at least I was proud of myself for catching that lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lord Vance II said:

Qyburn might just not be very original with the naming. But if when people think of the name Strong they think of breakbones, I could see that being what Qyburn wants them to think. 

But more than anything, I don't think Qyburn really gives a shit if anyone has doubts as to who ser Strong is. Who's going to say anything?

I agree with that. On both points 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, One-eyed Misbehavin said:

Assuming  The mountain that rides is "ser" Robert strong (not any other 8 feet tall men that fell into Qyburns dungeons) why did Qyburn name him after such a (formerly) famous house. Lots of people who read this series have also read  The Princess and the queen,  and we know that breakbones strong (or broken-bones as  mushroom so "hilariously" dubbed him)  was probably (was certainly) the father of Rhaenyra's  first set of children 

My point being.....  Why  give him the surname strong which  A clever character  with a good knowledge of history such as Tyrion  would so easily relate to the dance with dragons?  And he would also know that the curse of harrenhall  certainly lived up to the hype  on the strong house and took the lives of many from the family (if not all of them)

 My only guess is that the Strongs died out (or grew so small/scattered) so it would be hard to find some other Strong to validate his birth/knighthood 

I know that in-universe pretty much everyone knows who Robert Strong is. I'm just simply asking why Qyburn chose Strong instead of passing him off as a Dunk-Like Hedge Knight and saying someone dead (say Amory Lorch) knighted him? 

Maybe its meant as jape? A dead house for a dead knight? 

But yeah, its a bit on-the-nose, why not simply "the Strong" instead? If Qyburn maestered at Harrenhall he'd certainly come across the name there. And as a trained maester he'd know about the dance too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, One-eyed Misbehavin said:

Assuming  The mountain that rides is "ser" Robert strong (not any other 8 feet tall men that fell into Qyburns dungeons) why did Qyburn name him after such a (formerly) famous house. Lots of people who read this series have also read  The Princess and the queen,  and we know that breakbones strong (or broken-bones as  mushroom so "hilariously" dubbed him)  was probably (was certainly) the father of Rhaenyra's  first set of children 

My point being.....  Why  give him the surname strong which  A clever character  with a good knowledge of history such as Tyrion  would so easily relate to the dance with dragons?  And he would also know that the curse of harrenhall  certainly lived up to the hype  on the strong house and took the lives of many from the family (if not all of them)

 My only guess is that the Strongs died out (or grew so small/scattered) so it would be hard to find some other Strong to validate his birth/knighthood 

I know that in-universe pretty much everyone knows who Robert Strong is. I'm just simply asking why Qyburn chose Strong instead of passing him off as a Dunk-Like Hedge Knight and saying someone dead (say Amory Lorch) knighted him? 

There is a scene in Harrenhall where Roose burns an old book that Qyburn found in Harrenhall.  It has long been speculated about what the contents were.  I like to think that it had to do with magic and Qyburn used the knowledge he found within it to do whatever it is he did to Gregor, and so he named him after a family that once owned Harrenhall.  Mad Donelle Lothston was said to raise the dead, so that part fits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, aryagonnakill#2 said:

There is a scene in Harrenhall where Roose burns an old book that Qyburn found in Harrenhall.  It has long been speculated about what the contents were.  I like to think that it had to do with magic and Qyburn used the knowledge he found within it to do whatever it is he did to Gregor, and so he named him after a family that once owned Harrenhall.  Mad Donelle Lothston was said to raise the dead, so that part fits.

 Are there any other characters associated or rumored to raise the dead other than those 2? Just curious not trying to cripple your theory. Very nice btw as always. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, One-eyed Misbehavin said:

 Are there any other characters associated or rumored to raise the dead other than those 2? Just curious not trying to cripple your theory. Very nice btw as always. 

Very few to my knowledge, red priests and WW's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The author does seem to be weaving together a lot of threads that lead back to Harrenhal. I don't know if he is preparing us for a gigantic "last battle" at that location, or if he is just using it as background to enrich the symbolism of characters and events in the present day.

The death and rebirth symbolism is, obviously, a recurring theme throughout the books so a rebirth of both a Robert and a Strong in one character seems like a hint about the return of a royal person - maybe it's more like the birth of Cersei's royal ambitions for herself. The House Strong connection to royalty is through Ser Harwin Strong, rumored to have been the biological father of Princess Rhaenyra's three sons, one of whom was named Joffrey. Rereading the wiki about Princess Rhaenyra, it does seem as if there are parallels to Cercei's ambitions and her life story, although key details differ.

If the author does want us to draw clues about Ser Robert Strong and Cersei from Rhaenyra's relationship with Ser Harwin, the story that Ser Harwin fathered Rhaenyra's children would be a way of nudging us to compare Jaime and Ser Robert. Both are members of the Kingsguard. Ser Robert appears after Jaime has ignored an urgent request from Cersei that he return to King's Landing to champion her during the crisis with the High Sparrow. In a way, Ser Robert fills the vacuum that Jaime has left when he chooses to follow Brienne instead of responding to Cersei; he is Cersei's dream of a champion at a moment when Jaime has gravely disappointed her. The first name "Robert" adds a hint of irony, as King Robert was said to be the father of Cersei's children (as Laenor Velaryon was the nominal father of Rhaenyra's children) when, in fact, the biological father was someone else.

For what it's worth, the author may also be preparing us for a reappearance of some significant House Velaryon characters. We may have already seen one in the person of Aurane Waters. I'm not sure how this detail connects to Robert Strong, but it seems like it connects to the Rhaenyra story.

One more possibly relevant tangent: I suspect that Ser Mandon Moore of the Kingsguard is also a reanimated corpse, possibly of one of Rhaegar's King's Guard from the Tower of Joy. Who reanimated him, and why? Who are the other "reborn" members of the King's Guard from throughout the backstory and the ASOIAF books? Ser Richard Lonmouth / Lem Lemomcloak? Jon Connington? Any others?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Seams said:

The author does seem to be weaving together a lot of threads that lead back to Harrenhal. I don't know if he is preparing us for a gigantic "last battle" at that location, or if he is just using it as background to enrich the symbolism of characters and events in the present day.

The death and rebirth symbolism is, obviously, a recurring theme throughout the books so a rebirth of both a Robert and a Strong in one character seems like a hint about the return of a royal person - maybe it's more like the birth of Cersei's royal ambitions for herself. The House Strong connection to royalty is through Ser Harwin Strong, rumored to have been the biological father of Princess Rhaenyra's three sons, one of whom was named Joffrey. Rereading the wiki about Princess Rhaenyra, it does seem as if there are parallels to Cercei's ambitions and her life story, although key details differ.

If the author does want us to draw clues about Ser Robert Strong and Cersei from Rhaenyra's relationship with Ser Harwin, the story that Ser Harwin fathered Rhaenyra's children would be a way of nudging us to compare Jaime and Ser Robert. Both are members of the Kingsguard. Ser Robert appears after Jaime has ignored an urgent request from Cersei that he return to King's Landing to champion her during the crisis with the High Sparrow. In a way, Ser Robert fills the vacuum that Jaime has left when he chooses to follow Brienne instead of responding to Cersei; he is Cersei's dream of a champion at a moment when Jaime has gravely disappointed her. The first name "Robert" adds a hint of irony, as King Robert was said to be the father of Cersei's children (as Laenor Velaryon was the nominal father of Rhaenyra's children) when, in fact, the biological father was someone else.

For what it's worth, the author may also be preparing us for a reappearance of some significant House Velaryon characters. We may have already seen one in the person of Aurane Waters. I'm not sure how this detail connects to Robert Strong, but it seems like it connects to the Rhaenyra story.

One more possibly relevant tangent: I suspect that Ser Mandon Moore of the Kingsguard is also a reanimated corpse, possibly of one of Rhaegar's King's Guard from the Tower of Joy. Who reanimated him, and why? Who are the other "reborn" members of the King's Guard from throughout the backstory and the ASOIAF books? Ser Richard Lonmouth / Lem Lemomcloak? Jon Connington? Any others?

Can you explain a little further? My impression is he joined the KG wanting all the glory that comes along with being one of the finest swords in the kingdoms. Then he realized it was a shitty job and he grew bitter and began to hate the job entirely. (I have nothing to support this just how I pictured him) 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Seams said:

The author does seem to be weaving together a lot of threads that lead back to Harrenhal. I don't know if he is preparing us for a gigantic "last battle" at that location, or if he is just using it as background to enrich the symbolism of characters and events in the present day.

The death and rebirth symbolism is, obviously, a recurring theme throughout the books so a rebirth of both a Robert and a Strong in one character seems like a hint about the return of a royal person - maybe it's more like the birth of Cersei's royal ambitions for herself. The House Strong connection to royalty is through Ser Harwin Strong, rumored to have been the biological father of Princess Rhaenyra's three sons, one of whom was named Joffrey. Rereading the wiki about Princess Rhaenyra, it does seem as if there are parallels to Cercei's ambitions and her life story, although key details differ.

If the author does want us to draw clues about Ser Robert Strong and Cersei from Rhaenyra's relationship with Ser Harwin, the story that Ser Harwin fathered Rhaenyra's children would be a way of nudging us to compare Jaime and Ser Robert. Both are members of the Kingsguard. Ser Robert appears after Jaime has ignored an urgent request from Cersei that he return to King's Landing to champion her during the crisis with the High Sparrow. In a way, Ser Robert fills the vacuum that Jaime has left when he chooses to follow Brienne instead of responding to Cersei; he is Cersei's dream of a champion at a moment when Jaime has gravely disappointed her. The first name "Robert" adds a hint of irony, as King Robert was said to be the father of Cersei's children (as Laenor Velaryon was the nominal father of Rhaenyra's children) when, in fact, the biological father was someone else.

For what it's worth, the author may also be preparing us for a reappearance of some significant House Velaryon characters. We may have already seen one in the person of Aurane Waters. I'm not sure how this detail connects to Robert Strong, but it seems like it connects to the Rhaenyra story.

One more possibly relevant tangent: I suspect that Ser Mandon Moore of the Kingsguard is also a reanimated corpse, possibly of one of Rhaegar's King's Guard from the Tower of Joy. Who reanimated him, and why? Who are the other "reborn" members of the King's Guard from throughout the backstory and the ASOIAF books? Ser Richard Lonmouth / Lem Lemomcloak? Jon Connington? Any others?

Perhaps Aurane isn't a traitor, in the DWD the bastard of Driftmark proved that "not all bastards are traitors"

Perhaps his big warships aren't stolen rather taken away from the sparrows/gaining extra ships to add to the fleet. (The Royal fleet)

But I doubt it. Very seriously doubt it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The question is whether or not Clegane's head was removed and sent to Dorne and if 'Robert Strong' has his original head or another head. 

Quote

A Dance with Dragons - Cersei I

"And who would you have him name?"
She did not have a ready answer. My champion will need a new name as well as a new face. "Qyburn will know. Trust him in this. You and I have had our differences, Uncle, but for the blood we share and the love you bore my father, for Tommen's sake and the sake of his poor maimed sister, do as I ask you. Go to Lord Qyburn on my behalf, bring him a white cloak, and tell him that the time has come."

Cersei seems to have some idea of what Qyburn is up to with what remains of the Hound but isn't quite sure of the details since she is taken by surprise when her champion is introduced as Robert Strong.  The original Robert of House Strong also had 16 bastards like Robert Baratheon. King Robert was also referred to as 'strong' in the text multiple times.  So I'm wondering if we can expect a reverse play on King Robb Stark's body with a direwold head and The Hound's body with a king's head.  We don't know what Qyburn did with Robert's body before sending it to the Silent Sisters.

Cersei knows that she can't get away with presenting her champion as Sandor Clegane with head intact without giving Dorne an excuse to attack her. 

Quote

A Dance with Dragons - The Watcher

"I'll take that." Obara Sand plucked the skull from him and held it at arm's length. "What did the Mountain look like? How do we know that this is him? They could have dipped the head in tar. Why strip it to the bone?"
"Tar would have ruined the box," suggested Lady Nym, as Maester Caleotte scurried off. "No one saw the Mountain die, and no one saw his head removed. That troubles me, I confess, but what could the bitch queen hope to accomplish by deceiving us? If Gregor Clegane is alive, soon or late the truth will out. The man was eight feet tall, there is not another like him in all of Westeros. If any such appears again, Cersei Lannister will be exposed as a liar before all the Seven Kingdoms. She would be an utter fool to risk that. What could she hope to gain?"
"The skull is large enough, no doubt," said the prince. "And we know that Oberyn wounded Gregor grievously. Every report we have had since claims that Clegane died slowly, in great pain."

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LynnS said:

The question is whether or not Clegane's head was removed and sent to Dorne and if 'Robert Strong' has his original head or another head. 

Cersei seems to have some idea of what Qyburn is up to with what remains of the Hound but isn't quite sure of the details since she is taken by surprise when her champion is introduced as Robert Strong.  The original Robert of House Strong also had 16 bastards like Robert Baratheon. King Robert was also referred to as 'strong' in the text multiple times.  So I'm wondering if we can expect a reverse play on King Robb Stark's body with a direwold head and The Hound's body with a king's head.  We don't know what Qyburn did with Robert's body before sending it to the Silent Sisters.

Cersei knows that she can't get away with presenting her champion as Sandor Clegane with head intact without giving Dorne an excuse to attack her. 

You said Hound / Sandor, but I think you meant Mountain / Gregor. Still the Clegane sigil is three dogs, so your point is still relevant.

But your point is well taken about the connection between the death of Robb (Stark) and Robert (Baratheon). Robert was killed by a boar, and this could be wordplay with boar / Robb. I have been thinking about the pagan tradition of the Boar's Head Festival at the winter solstice, and wondered if the death of Jinglebell when Robb died was supposed to be a hint to the reader about the winter solstice, contrasting with the death of King Robert (who has been discussed in this forum as the embodiment of the Summer King). Sorting out the boar symbolism could be the key.

Speaking of which, you quote Cersei appealing to her Uncle Kevan by reminding him of the love he "bore" her father. Ned used similar wording when he asked Robert to spare Sansa's direwolf, appealing to the love he "bore" Ned's sister. So we are definitely supposed to compare these beheading situations and the death (of Lady and/or Robb Stark) with the rebirth (of Robert and/or The Mountain).

5 hours ago, One-eyed Misbehavin said:

Can you explain a little further? My impression is he joined the KG wanting all the glory that comes along with being one of the finest swords in the kingdoms. Then he realized it was a shitty job and he grew bitter and began to hate the job entirely. (I have nothing to support this just how I pictured him) 

We know nothing of Mandon Moore's desire for glory or whether he is unhappy with his job. We have POV descriptions of him as looking dead. I am extrapolating a bit, I admit. I think old Kingsguard guys are showing up where we have young people with claims to a throne - Ser Barristan goes to Dany, Lem Lemoncloak is with Gendry, Jon Connington is with fAegon, Arys Oakheart was with Arianne. I have the feeling there are more hidden Kingsguard out there.

Also (I mentioned this in another thread somewhere) Ser Mandon got his job because Jon Arryn asked Robert to appoint him, even though neither Jon Arryn or Robert really liked the guy. His name comes from a minor noble house from the Vale without any other living family members - the perfect "cover" for someone who wants to be appointed to a prestigious job but doesn't want anyone asking a lot of questions. If Jon Arryn vouches for him, that's all the references he needs. My guess was that Ned Stark asked Jon Arryn to give the guy his old job back, and Jon and Robert figured they owed Ned a favor or two, so they hired him (even though he was dead).

5 hours ago, One-eyed Misbehavin said:

Perhaps Aurane isn't a traitor, in the DWD the bastard of Driftmark proved that "not all bastards are traitors"

Perhaps his big warships aren't stolen rather taken away from the sparrows/gaining extra ships to add to the fleet. (The Royal fleet)

But I doubt it. Very seriously doubt it. 

I have not speculated about Aurane Waters, other than to wonder if he is part of the Velaryon subplot that was dropped a few generations ago. Your guess is as good as mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Seams said:

You said Hound / Sandor, but I think you meant Mountain / Gregor. Still the Clegane sigil is three dogs, so your point is still relevant.

Yes,  that is what I meant.  LOL.  I really got that mixed up.  Gregor Glegane who is as much a hell hound as a mountain.  And Robert Strong had 16 bastards not 13.  Of course we don't know what happened to Robb Stark's head.  The intent was to send it to Joffrey at KL; but I imagine it would be covered in tar to preserve it.  So Robb Stark's head on the Mountain's shoulders is an alternate choice to Robert Baratheon.       

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Seams said:

You said Hound / Sandor, but I think you meant Mountain / Gregor. Still the Clegane sigil is three dogs, so your point is still relevant.

But your point is well taken about the connection between the death of Robb (Stark) and Robert (Baratheon). Robert was killed by a boar, and this could be wordplay with boar / Robb. I have been thinking about the pagan tradition of the Boar's Head Festival at the winter solstice, and wondered if the death of Jinglebell when Robb died was supposed to be a hint to the reader about the winter solstice, contrasting with the death of King Robert (who has been discussed in this forum as the embodiment of the Summer King). Sorting out the boar symbolism could be the key.

Speaking of which, you quote Cersei appealing to her Uncle Kevan by reminding him of the love he "bore" her father. Ned used similar wording when he asked Robert to spare Sansa's direwolf, appealing to the love he "bore" Ned's sister. So we are definitely supposed to compare these beheading situations and the death (of Lady and/or Robb Stark) with the rebirth (of Robert and/or The Mountain).

We know nothing of Mandon Moore's desire for glory or whether he is unhappy with his job. We have POV descriptions of him as looking dead. I am extrapolating a bit, I admit. I think old Kingsguard guys are showing up where we have young people with claims to a throne - Ser Barristan goes to Dany, Lem Lemoncloak is with Gendry, Jon Connington is with fAegon, Arys Oakheart was with Arianne. I have the feeling there are more hidden Kingsguard out there.

Also (I mentioned this in another thread somewhere) Ser Mandon got his job because Jon Arryn asked Robert to appoint him, even though neither Jon Arryn or Robert really liked the guy. His name comes from a minor noble house from the Vale without any other living family members - the perfect "cover" for someone who wants to be appointed to a prestigious job but doesn't want anyone asking a lot of questions. If Jon Arryn vouches for him, that's all the references he needs. My guess was that Ned Stark asked Jon Arryn to give the guy his old job back, and Jon and Robert figured they owed Ned a favor or two, so they hired him (even though he was dead).

I have not speculated about Aurane Waters, other than to wonder if he is part of the Velaryon subplot that was dropped a few generations ago. Your guess is as good as mine.

Connington was hand but was not in the KG 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/26/2016 at 5:51 AM, One-eyed Misbehavin said:

Assuming  The mountain that rides is "ser" Robert strong (not any other 8 feet tall men that fell into Qyburns dungeons) why did Qyburn name him after such a (formerly) famous house. Lots of people who read this series have also read  The Princess and the queen,  and we know that breakbones strong (or broken-bones as  mushroom so "hilariously" dubbed him)  was probably (was certainly) the father of Rhaenyra's  first set of children 

My point being.....  Why  give him the surname strong which  A clever character  with a good knowledge of history such as Tyrion  would so easily relate to the dance with dragons?  And he would also know that the curse of harrenhall  certainly lived up to the hype  on the strong house and took the lives of many from the family (if not all of them)

 My only guess is that the Strongs died out (or grew so small/scattered) so it would be hard to find some other Strong to validate his birth/knighthood 

I know that in-universe pretty much everyone knows who Robert Strong is. I'm just simply asking why Qyburn chose Strong instead of passing him off as a Dunk-Like Hedge Knight and saying someone dead (say Amory Lorch) knighted him? 

The beast is the embodiment of strength. Hence the name. He probably read about the house at Harrenhal. Pretty simple really 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/27/2016 at 8:07 AM, One-eyed Misbehavin said:

Perhaps Aurane isn't a traitor, in the DWD the bastard of Driftmark proved that "not all bastards are traitors"

Perhaps his big warships aren't stolen rather taken away from the sparrows/gaining extra ships to add to the fleet. (The Royal fleet)

But I doubt it. Very seriously doubt it. 

"Traitor" can be a subjective term. Yes, Aurane betrays Cersei. But let's not forget who the Lannisters are to him. His brother, Monford Velaryon, died on the Blackwater, where the Velaryon fleet was destroyed by wildfire.  From his point of view, the Lannisters murdered his family and friends.  Why not work to deceive them? 

Also consider the rumor from the docks, which Aurane reports to the Small Council, that Stannis hired the Golden Company in Myr.  He defected possibly thinking he'd be supporting Stannis, the king that his family still backs.

I don't deny that he seems to be ambitious -- I think his "Baelish" eyes and LF-like trick on Cersei hints at this.  I think he'll see opportunity in Aegon.  But I also can't deny that he is a grey character.  He may be truly loyal to his family, as stated above.  We don't know what his "ambition" for Dragonstone truly was.  Does he want it for himself or for someone else?  Is he really a pirate?  Pycelle thinks so, but Connington also wishes for the GC to be confused for pirates (among other things, to better disguise their fleet) in ADwD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...