Jump to content
AncalagonTheBlack

Malazan: High House Shadow edition

Recommended Posts

As a side note have any of the Esslemont books explained the discrepancy in the early books where Cotillion and Shadowthrone seem to actually hate Lasseen for killing them and the later books, where it was their plan all along to die and become Gods and free the Crippled God?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ajûrbkli said:

As a side note have any of the Esslemont books explained the discrepancy in the early books where Cotillion and Shadowthrone seem to actually hate Lasseen for killing them and the later books, where it was their plan all along to die and become Gods and free the Crippled God?



Nah, GotMisms are mostly left as GotMisms. It's not just that, actually- on my current reread I realised that the whole damn series takes a turn for the friendlier after GotM. Lots of characters suddenly get less mean and less angrily disposed towards others. Lasseen herself too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 03/11/2017 at 0:27 AM, Darth Richard II said:

Anyone know if any of Walk In Shadow was actually written? Curious if he got far into it before the publishers, uh, made their decision.

No. From Erikson's comments I'm not sure if he even started it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, so no book three?  Fall of Light was admittedly a mixed bag for me, but I thought Forge of Darkness was one of his best.  Bummer.  I knew Erikson wasn't a big seller, but I thought he did well enough not to go the way of Stover and Stackpole.  All my favorites or one time favorites seem to be disappearing.  Now I'm kind of worried about the final two books of Moorcock's Sanctuary of the White Friars trilogy.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oddly, I still haven't read Fall of Light. Had it since release day, but not gotten more than a few pages in. So while a shame this news isn't devastating... Though I will be more disappointed once I finally do get to it (the plan here was to finish the reread and go into FoL fresh).



In other news, Deadhouse Landing has landed. Picked it up today. Should be good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone finish Deadhouse Landing yet? Finished last night, and this is the best stuff ICE has put out there.

So, I gather that Kellanved is using a multiplicity of Wardens, right? He's tapped Shadow, Night and a few others it seems. If I'm reading it correctly. He certainly is a Mage worthy of Ascendancy. I always felt, while reading Malazan that he was just a trickster and used deception more than anything. If anything we're seeing just how powerful he really is.

Questions.

1.I can't remember but does Hood kill the girl that Dassem placed in the Deadhouse?

2. The one girl who's a mage for one of the ships, I don't think we get a name, is she someone we know from the main series.

 

3. I don't understand the Kallor/Nightchill deal there. In sure that would be been something we learn in Erikson's trilogy that's been put on hold, shame.

And, finally Dassem is a badass mofo. That seen on the bridges was awesome and now we know where the name Bridgeburners comes from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Darth Richard II said:

Random aside and thread derailment! That mystar flashback on your blog is GOLD. I totally forgot that guy existed.

Those were the good old days! :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The name mystar didn't ring a bell, but I checked the blog and I definitely remember that.  I also remember Paris getting pissed off about it.

Edit: Oh man, I'm looking at the sffworld thread with mystar and Werthead trying to discredit each other.  Of course, only one of them was legit.  This is good stuff.

Edited by End of Disc One

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, End of Disc One said:

The name mystar didn't ring a bell, but I checked the blog and I definitely remember that.  I also remember Paris getting pissed off about it.

Edit: Oh man, I'm looking at the sffworld thread with mystar and Werthead trying to discredit each other.  Of course, only one of them was legit.  This is good stuff.

That was bizarre at the time, let alone in retrospect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahahahaha, My* was a ton of fun! Still can't believe the effort that guy went to.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New Esslemont interview:

http://www.fantasybookreview.co.uk/interview/2017/ian-c-esslemont/

JSH: Path to Ascendancy is a trilogy, correct?

ICE: Currently, the Path to Ascendancy series stands as a trilogy (sort of). It may expand, but that will all depend upon its execution and reception. In other words, if it works and I enjoy it as much as the readers, then there is a chance it could expand.

JSH: What is your current tease for the third book in the Path to Ascendancy series?

ICE: Gah, I have no current tease. What I will say is that just as Deadhouse Landing picked up right after Dancer’s Lament, so too will the next pick up, and that its current working title is Kellanved’s Reach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
The continent of Quon Tali is divided into a morass of squabbling city-states, the days of the Talian Hegemony long past. But, in the south, the Kingdom of Kan is on the move. Its armies are moving on Li Heng, the great crossroads city at the heart of the continent. The Protectress of Heng and her powerful (but eccentric) cadre of mages are prepared to stand against them, but they are distracted by the arrival of a bizarre mage, a skilled assassin hungry to make a name for himself and a warrior of preternatural skills dedicated to the service of the God of Death. Unbeknown to all, these three will take a broken continent and forge out of it one of the greatest empires ever known.
 
The Malazan universe of fantasy novels (which now number twenty-one) has attracted a reputation for being unapproachable and difficult to get into, with the traditional first novel in the setting, Gardens of the Moon, having a confusing opening and little in the way of exposition. Some readers are fine with that, but many are not. Since then, authors Steven Erikson and Ian Cameron Esslemont have mused on other ways to get into the series (you can arguably start with Deadhouse Gates or Night of Knives instead, or even Midnight Tides, but all have arguments against them). Erikson even tried to create an alternate entry point with Forge of Darkness (the first in the Kharkanas prequel trilogy) but only succeeded in creating a book that only makes sense if you've read the rest of the series first.
 
Dancer's Lament, on the other hand, is the first book in the series since Gardens that I would feel really comfortable suggesting that people start with. Unlike most Malazan novels, which are enormous, sprawl in lots of directions, have huge casts of characters (which sometimes completely change from one volume to another) and feature dense and sometimes obtuse writing, Dancer's Lament is tight, focused, relatively straightforward and relentless in pace. It has all the strongest hallmarks of the Malazan series - impressive sorcery, intriguing (but never overwrought) worldbuilding, good humour and the use of compassion as an overriding theme - whilst dumping most of the negatives. Or, to put it more primitively, Dancer's Lament is all killer, no filler.
 
The tightness comes from there just being three POV characters. Dorin Rav is an assassin beyond compare looking for fame and fortune. Malazan veterans will know him, of course, as Dancer, but in this book he's just a young man with real skill but who sometimes gets in over his head. Silk, one of the mages of Li Heng, is an arrogant and apparently amoral fop who comes to realise, in his darkest hour, how much this city and his employer has come to mean to him. Iko, a Kanese Sword-Dancer, is a formidable warrior who has invested so much time in her fighting skills that she has neglected her personal ones, and has trouble forming bonds with her fellow warriors as a result. Silk and Iko appear in other books (Iko under a different name, and it's fun for old hands to try to work out who she is), but here they're presented as newcomers and youngsters trying to find their way in the world.
 
The book takes place a century or so before the events of Gardens of the Moon and the central plot is refreshingly simple: Li Heng is under siege, the city's rulers are trying to repulse the attack, the attackers are trying to take the city and a whole bunch of other people are caught in the middle, most notably Dorin Rav who is navigating his way through the city's underworld in search of profit. The problem is that Dorin keeps tripping over his conscience, spending too much time worrying about the friends he's made on the way and is constantly distracted by a crazy mage he bumped into on the plains and now can't seem to avoid coming into contact with. The common complaint about prequels is that they're either not telling us anything we don't know or they're going out of their way to create new stories which don't gel with what's gone before.
 
Dancer's Lament skirts this problem quite straightforwardly. His earlier novel Return of the Crimson Guard features sections about one of the conflicts that is mentioned in this novel, but it turns out that a lot of those reports are erroneous or conflate two separate conflicts into one and it's entertaining seeing the "real" events unfold in this book. It also helps we're in a period of time a while before our protagonists even arrive on Malaz Island, so there's a lot of room to manoeuvre. Indeed, getting to know characters like the Protectress when we know what her ultimate fate is can add a bit more resonance to events. Of course, it might be that "what is commonly known" may not turn out to be the truth at all.
 
Esslemont has a more direct and sparse prose style than Erikson, which has sometimes made his books feel like a light salad compared to Erikson's four-course meals. Not so here, where Dancer's Lament leaps off the page with verve and confidence. The characters are vivid and feel real (Erikson's depiction of characters - even the same ones - can sometimes feel remote and alienating in contrast) and we come to care about even minor bit players such as the bird-keeping girl Ullara (a damaged, philosophical character who sometimes feels like she's been parachuted in from a China Mieville novel) and the various soldiers manning the walls of the city.
 
There are some negatives, but these are minor. Esslemont's brisk and energetic style in this book is very refreshing for the series but it leads to the opposite of the usual problem: if most Malazan novels could stand to lose a few dozen pages of repetitive and laboured introspection, Dancer's Lament sometimes feels too short and some storylines feel like they could have been expanded and spread out a bit more. The distribution of chapters between characters also feels a bit too uneven, with Iko sometimes vanishing for large chunks of time and the plots of the various city mages not really going anywhere (although some of them will be picked up chronologically later on, particularly in Return of the Crimson Guard, which revisits Li Heng at the height of the Malazan Empire). This does make the world feel alive and still changing and evolving outside of the focus of the main plot, however.
 
Dancer's Lament (****½) is, overall, a fast and satisfying read, the best Malazan novel in quite a while. It is available now (UK, USA). Its sequel, Deadhouse Landing, was published last month. The third book in the Path to Ascendancy series has the working title Kellanved's Reach and should be out in late 2018 or early 2019.

 

Deadhouse Landing by Ian Cameron Esslemont

Empires are usually born from great deeds and mighty events, order and victories rather than chaos and shadows. But a new power now stands on the brink of realisation. A crew of renegade Napans have washed ashore on remote Malaz Island and formed an  alliance of convenience with a mad mage and an assassin. From the mainland comes a swordsman without equal. On neighbouring Kartool Island a high priest in the cult of D'rek is betrayed and seeks a new home where he can belong. Great powers are drawn to Malaz City, where a new empire will be born when it is least expected and, at its heart, lies the mysterious ruin known as the Deadhouse.

Dancer's Lament, the first novel in the Path to Ascendancy series, introduced the characters of Wu and Dorin, whom history will remember as Kellanved and Dancer, Ammanas and Cotillion, Shadowthrone and the Rope. That book chronicled their first meeting, their first acquaintance with Dassem Ultor, the Mortal Sword of Hood, and their first explorations of the mysterious Realm of Shadow. Deadhouse Landing is its direct sequel but in many respects is the book that I think more established Malazan fans were expecting first time out.

Deadhouse Landing is, simply put, the story of how Kellanved and Dancer recruited their "old guard" of friends and allies and took control of Malaz Island. It turns out this was less pre-planned than previous novels indicated, with Kellanved and Dancer's rise to power emerging from a sequence of improvisations, holding actions and comedies of error, most of them stemming from the idiocy of those who try to oppose them.

This is, remarkably, a slightly shorter book than Dancer's Lament (already one of the shortest books in the Malazan canon) but one that has a much bigger cast. As well as Dancer and Kellanved, the book focuses on the Napan refugees led by Princess Sureth (now reduced to a reluctant barmaid named Surly), Dassem Ultor's journey from Li Heng to Malaz City via a chance meeting with the Seguleh, the misadventures of the priest Tayschrenn in Kartool and the long-suffering indulgences of Tattersail, the mage-mistress of Mock. These are all major figures from the Malazan novels, legends we meet now in their younger days when they were far less wise, less seasoned and more human. We also see some pretty major events alluded to in later books, such as Kellanved's first entry to the Malaz Deadhouse and the running battles through the streets of the city with various criminal gangs.

These struggles in the Malaz City criminal underworld feel a bit overindulged, but at the end of the book makes it clear why we are spending so much time with these knife-hands and thugs, as many of them also show up in Steven Erikson's novels (particularly the early ones), almost all under different names.

Prequels can often feel creatively stifled, the author stymied by the import of actually depicting events which later books talk about as hushed legends. Esslemont has no such reluctance here. Instead, as with Dancer's Lament, this book fairly overflows with enthusiasm and energy. We lose the tight focus of the earlier novel on just three core characters, with the story rotating through a larger number of characters, with less time for each one. But Esslemont makes this work with short and punchy chapters which relate the story with relentless inevitability.

The book doesn't have too many weaknesses. One Malazan fan-favourite villain shows up but doesn't really accomplish anything. His story feels like it could have been dropped in favour of more focus on one of the other storylines, but then this isn't a long book and his total number of pages in the novel isn't very high. Others may complain that too many characters in this book show up to be previously-established Malazan characters from the chronologically later novels, but then that's kind of the point. These are the events that drew the "old guard" and many other famous faces together, so that's less of a bug and more of a feature.

Ultimately, Deadhouse Landing (****½) is another tight and enjoyable read, all the best for its focus and short length even as it describes the mighty events that shaped the Malazan Empire. It builds on the very fine foundation stones laid by Dancer's Lament. It is available now (UK, USA). The third book in the Path to Ascendancy series has the working title Kellanved's Reach and should be out in late 2018 or early 2019.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why must every character's name change to something different in each new book?  What is the point?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×