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UK Politics: Time Marches On


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So ... it's time the Queen stepped in, right?  The politicians are all clueless and incompetent,  And I think the EU might respect the Queen more. Or she could just address the nation and insist that we all stop being so silly.

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20 minutes ago, Mosi Mynn said:

So ... it's time the Queen stepped in, right?  The politicians are all clueless and incompetent,  And I think the EU might respect the Queen more. Or she could just address the nation and insist that we all stop being so silly.

What would be the point. Adam Lambert is no Freddie Mercury.

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1 hour ago, Nothing Has Changed said:

2) The issue with the claim May could have negotiated a deal with the EU before triggering article 50 is that the EU refused to do this. So, in order to negotiate Brexit and a future relationship she had to trigger article 50. The Brexiteers wanted to negotiate before article 50 was triggered.

And the issue with this claim, is that absolutely nobody has made it to start with.

May should have negotiated with our own parliment before triggering Article 50 NOT the EU.

There should have been cross party talks, to work out what the UK actually wanted from any deal; and THEN start negotiating (with a bipartisan team) with the EU. As it is, we've spent 2 years disagreeing with ourselves; essentially meaning that any negotiations with the EU have been a complete waste of time all round.

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2 minutes ago, Which Tyler said:

And the issue with this claim, is that absolutely nobody has made it to start with.

May should have negotiated with our own parliment before triggering Article 50 NOT the EU.

There should have been cross party talks, to work out what the UK actually wanted from any deal; and THEN start negotiating (with a bipartisan team) with the EU. As it is, we've spent 2 years disagreeing with ourselves; essentially meaning that any negotiations with the EU have been a complete waste of time all round.

Sounds great on paper,  but what makes you think they ever would have agreed to anything in that case either. More than likely article 50 would never be triggered. ( probably a good thing)

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1 hour ago, Nothing Has Changed said:

43 Tories who voted against last time switched to supporting the deal, including David Davis and Nadine Dorries.

Only 3 Labour mps voted with the government, including Caroline Flint. 

75 Tory MP's however, proved that they have their brains in their backsides.

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10 minutes ago, Heartofice said:

Sounds great on paper,  but what makes you think they ever would have agreed to anything in that case either. More than likely article 50 would never be triggered. ( probably a good thing)

2 years ago I geuinely thought we had enough competent MPs who might actually be interested in something other than national suicide to believe that it could have been done.

I still think it might have been possible if done in good faith. However, the last 2 years have proven beyond a shadow of a doubt, that there really isn't much in the way of "good faith" "competence" in Westminster.

 

Oh, and yes, if parliement can't come to any decision at all, then returning to the people, or calling it quits, would have both been valid options - just as they are now after parliament has proven incapable of doing anything.

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2 minutes ago, Tywin et al. said:

How long does it take to apply for an extension on the exit date?

Five minutes.  I expect the Commons will request such an extension on Thursday.  To their immense surprise, the ERG will discover that most MP's do not favour a No Deal Brexit.

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8 minutes ago, Tywin et al. said:

How long does it take to apply for an extension on the exit date?

British MPs will (presumably) vote for an extension on Thursday.

The interesting question will be for what kind of extension they'll vote (if at all).

Short one, late May would mean May will return with her deal then and it'll be either her deal or no deal. And no really no more extension or road to kick the can down.

Or a longer one, with the UK participating in the EU elections.

Ian Dunt's take.

My prediction on what will happen.

Spoiler

Westminster will vote on the short extension, with the support from the Labour frontbench, as the longer extension and participating in EU elections is not the will of the people (yadda yadda yadda). Late May approaches and... it's still the same deal with no-deal as an alternative. Labour will huff and puff about it not being their Brexit deal, thus they cannot endorse it. Parts of the Labour backbenches will rebel, the Tory wingnuts and the DUP will still reject that deal (as in no-deal is a good deal for them). And then it's anyone's guess whether her deal passes, I think it will by a narrow margin.

 

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13 minutes ago, A Horse Named Stranger said:

British MPs will (presumably) vote for an extension on Thursday.

The interesting question will be for what kind of extension they'll vote (if at all).

Short one, late May would mean May will return with her deal then and it'll be either her deal or no deal. And no really no more extension or road to kick the can down.

Or a longer one, with the UK participating in the EU elections.

Ian Dunt's take.

My prediction on what will happen.

  Reveal hidden contents

Westminster will vote on the short extension, with the support from the Labour frontbench, as the longer extension and participating in EU elections is not the will of the people (yadda yadda yadda). Late May approaches and... it's still the same deal with no-deal as an alternative. Labour will huff and puff about it not being their Brexit deal, thus they cannot endorse it. Parts of the Labour backbenches will rebel, the Tory wingnuts and the DUP will still reject that deal (as in no-deal is a good deal for them). And then it's anyone's guess whether her deal passes, I think it will by a narrow margin.

 

 

The EU ought to tell us to piss off, when we ask for an extension, but that runs the risk of causing considerable hardship to their economies as well as our own (at a time when economic growth has slowed right down) so I expect they'll agree to kick the can down the road.

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Today was a great day for Britain. Brexit is dead.

The house will vote against No Deal tomorrow.

Then May has no choice but to call an election and resign.

And if it comes to another referendum there is no way Leave will win. We know what Brexit looks like now. There will be no unicorns. Bozza and JRM and Farage will not be able to make the same wild promises as before.

 

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Just now, HelenaExMachina said:

Who, the Queen? :P

(Sorry, your post rather humourously followed MMs about the Queen)

I wouldn't blame her. All this must be doing her head in.

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5 minutes ago, Spockydog said:

Today was a great day for Britain. Brexit is dead.

If it comes to another referendum there is no way Leave will win. We know what Brexit looks like now. There will be no unicorns. Bozza and JRM and Farage will not be able to make the same wild promises as before.

 

Mmh, unfortunately Corbyn was notably silent about a second referendum today and favours, it seems, the pointless Norway option. Unless his feet are being held over the coals by Chuka Umunna or Tom Watson he will do his best to bring about Brexit. 

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7 minutes ago, Spockydog said:

Today was a great day for Britain. Brexit is dead.

The house will vote against No Deal tomorrow.

Then May has no choice but to call an election and resign.

And if it comes to another referendum there is no way Leave will win. We know what Brexit looks like now. There will be no unicorns. Bozza and JRM and Farage will not be able to make the same wild promises as before.

 

They will vote against No Deal.  The House will vote against everything.  It's voting in favour of something that's the problem.

If there were an election right now, the Conservatives would probably win it.

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3 minutes ago, SeanF said:

If there were an election right now, the Conservatives would probably win it.

And then what...? I mean, they're not going to repeat the exact same excruciating process, are they? Brexit is dead.

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1 minute ago, Spockydog said:

Today was a great day for Britain. Brexit is dead.

No, it isn't. Thursday is the important day with regards to the votes in the commons.

1 minute ago, Spockydog said:

The house will vote against No Deal tomorrow.

So? I am voting against Winter every year for that matter. Again, Thursday matters, when they decide what kind of extension they will be asking for.

1 minute ago, Spockydog said:

Then May has no choice but to call an election and resign.

Really? Why is that? Has Labour managed to get enough votes for a motion of no confidence?

3 minutes ago, Spockydog said:

And if it comes to another referendum there is no way Leave will win. We know what Brexit looks like now. There will be no unicorns. Bozza and JRM and Farage will not be able to make the same wild promises as before. 

Let's not get ahead of ourselves here. As of right now, there's no majority for a second referendum, but what is it now; a new GE or a second referendum?

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