Jump to content

Recommended Posts

My Aunt (and uncle before he passed away) have had 2 Pembroke Corgi's over the last 20 years. They love them, I'm always happy to dogsit for her. They are these roly poly bundles of love.

Smart and trained very well. Love activity, games, rides, and walks, but when everyone is settled they have no problem being calm. Wild as a puppy like most dogs and when they mature they get more reserved but still have a playful streak.

That's my experience with them at least, and it's all positive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Aunt (and uncle before he passed away) have had 2 Pembroke Corgi's over the last 20 years. They love them, I'm always happy to dogsit for her. They are these roly poly bundles of love.

Smart and trained very well. Love activity, games, rides, and walks, but when everyone is settled they have no problem being calm. Wild as a puppy like most dogs and when they mature they get more reserved but still have a playful streak.

That's my experience with them at least, and it's all positive.

That's what I heard as well which is why we were considering one. Love to hear the affirmation. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just beware that they are a herding breed and can have  a lot of energy. They are definitely a big dog in a small body.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone here have a Corgi? Thoughts on the breed? We're thinking of getting one next year when we move into our new apartment. Figured it was the right size and personality for NY.

The only negative is they do shed kind of bad. I have a Keeshond so I know shedding, but with my dog while the hair is much more voluminous, it's heavier and can be picked up or brushed off easily.

The Corgi's fur is finer and sticks to clothes and furniture more, Frequent vacuuming and having a lint brush around will be necessary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you get a corgi, make sure you plan for intense socialization and basic training.  This is part of the package.  They are very intelligent and active dogs.  If you don't anticipate this they will invariably become dickheads.  Two types of corgis come into my practice:  1) corgis that are extremely awesome dogs that everyone loves and wants to see or 2) dickhead bitey little shites that need to be muzzled the minute they walk into my doors.  This is all dependent on how they were socialized during the first 16 weeks of their adorable little lives.  

If you have no intention of doing some type of puppy class or starting obedience with a great trainer, then please, please, please do not have the intention of getting a corgi.  It's the dog breed for people that really enjoy getting into making their dog's great family members from day one.  If you aren't willing to put in the time and effort, I will direct you to other small breeds.  Like shih-tzus, or bichons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My sister had a Corgi that fit into the first category Ix listed.  He was one of the best, most well-behaved dogs I've ever met.  She does put lots of time into working with her pets, so I'd be surprised if he had turned out any other way.  He was a little sweetheart who passed way too soon. 

One thing he did that showed that he had a wild hair, though, was that any squeaky toy that came within his grasp would be shaken and bitten and tossed around and worried until the plastic squeaky thing was dug out of it, leaving just the shadow of a ravaged toy behind.  :lol:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing he did that showed that he had a wild hair, though, was that any squeaky toy that came within his grasp would be shaken and bitten and tossed around and worried until the plastic squeaky thing was dug out of it, leaving just the shadow of a ravaged toy behind.  :lol:

 

That's what my aunt's does too. She repairs the toys by putting the squeaker and stuffing back in and sews it up just so the dog can destroy it again.

But my dog did the exact same thing too when she was young. We had so many toy skins lying around :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only negative is they do shed kind of bad. I have a Keeshond so I know shedding, but with my dog while the hair is much more voluminous, it's heavier and can be picked up or brushed off easily.

The Corgi's fur is finer and sticks to clothes and furniture more, Frequent vacuuming and having a lint brush around will be necessary.

This is my worry. The shedding, from what I read, is really extensive. We'll have to think on how we handle that if we do. I just love Corgi personalities...

As for socialization, that won't be much of an issue. We plan on taking it to puppy training classes, live across the street from the park and I've grown up with 7 dogs over my lifetime, most being Rhodesian Ridgebacks where we try our best to socialize as early as possible. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Recent(ish) photos of the pup (I really can't justify calling him pup for much longer!) after his haircut 

ABhbGXr.jpghzMVyd4.jpg

Man, what a pitiful look.  "Why are you abusing me, Mama?"  :(     They sure can lay it on thick, can't they?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man, what a pitiful look.  "Why are you abusing me, Mama?"  :(     They sure can lay it on thick, can't they?

He has perpetual puppy dog sad eyes, even when he is clearly having the time of his life. (funnily enough, he absolutely loves going to the groomers for his hair cut). He does love to guilt trip me!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is my worry. The shedding, from what I read, is really extensive. We'll have to think on how we handle that if we do. I just love Corgi personalities...

As for socialization, that won't be much of an issue. We plan on taking it to puppy training classes, live across the street from the park and I've grown up with 7 dogs over my lifetime, most being Rhodesian Ridgebacks where we try our best to socialize as early as possible. 

Controllig hair isn't as hard as it sounds. One good ten minute brush outside once a day will go a long way to helping with the shedding inside. Do it right before or after his walk. It will quickly become a habit on your part and won't seem like a chore.

And I'm also going to emphasize how important early socializing, training and daily exercise is with a corgi.  Don't stop at puppy classes, commit to basic and preferably, advanced training classes also. Maybe consider something like agility or flyball. 

Corgi's love to have a job. They will find one if you don't give them one. :D

Lovely family pets when you put the work in. Good luck!

Edited by cdawnb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, the big Parvo debate.When does everyone think its safe to take the dog out after 2nd jab? Vet just now said 10 days, I know others who say 14, and yet more who go as low as 5. .I know which of those I favour, as I want to get her outside and socialising. I've also got Guinness, who is going out and bringing things back after all

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a couple of random dog pics:

12239433_10103114725038060_2950711419619

11895964_10102961771074030_2299105184124

And probably my favorite pic of Loki stealing a table at the brewery next door:
10872874_10102588748154950_7042993324510

I love living in a place that's dog friendly.  I had Loki in Ohio for a few years and couldn't take him anywhere.  It sucked.  Here I can take the dogs basically everywhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haven't posted in here yet because it always felt like I would have to write a giant, epic, wall of text to convey how awesome my dog is.  Her name is Darcy, she's a 10 year old Australian Cattle Dog mix, and she looks exactly like a dingo.  

Here is an album of some Darcy glamour shots

When she was a puppy we lived in San Diego, and she grew up at the O.B. Dog Beach and the dog park at Soledad Mt. Road.  She got to be with me at work most of the time there, we lived in a van for awhile and also on a boat for about a year.  We moved across the country to Connecticut when she was 4, we've moved back and forth between upstate NY and northeastern CT.  

Darcy really digs the east coast, more places to go hiking and offleash where the dog isn't going to get spiked on an agave.  She's been with me on some pretty long hikes and snowshoe trips, and always keeps up.  She's only really started slowing down a bit in the last year, but she's still really hyper and playful.  Just doesn't run at full speed the entire time we're on a walk anymore.  

 

eta:  link should work now

 

I think she's had a pretty fun life for a dog, she's been able to come to work with me a lot, which she seems to enjoy.  For about 6 weeks this one time I got to build a stonewall in this big park.  She came to work with me there everyday and pretty much had the run of the place; it hadn't opened for the season yet 

 

She's a very social dog, so she didn't mind when my GF and her 6 year old German Pointer mix, Bonnie, moved in with us.  Bonnie's a sweetheart too and the two girls get along great.  

Here's a picture of her, check out the album above too if you'd like:

TcEX65r.jpg

Edited by larrytheimp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tal is NEVER being allowed to play with this toy in public

fetch?id=81717&d=1450300495&type=medium   fetch?id=81719&d=1450300549&type=medium

It's... a double ended dildo. I can only assume that my mum didn't know that. And yes, we have 2 girl dogs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oioi? :lol:  That is brilliant.She looks so bashful in the second photo too.

We (well, parents) are getting another dog, picking him up next week. He is a cocker spaniel. Dont have any good photos of him (though parents went to see him to make sure everything was fine etc) but will upload some once we do. He is very cute :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×