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Small Questions v. 10105

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1 hour ago, OtherFromAnotherMother said:

Does Bran know about the catspaw?

Could be wrong, but I don't think so. Not very helpful, I know,.. 

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3 hours ago, OtherFromAnotherMother said:

Does Bran know about the catspaw?

That I remember Bran does not know about the the man with the dagger that tried to kill him. Bran did on occasion dream of the "golden" man in his comma dreams. Below is one occasion.

A Game of Thrones - Bran III     Bran screamed.    The crow took to the air, cawing. Not that, it shrieked at him. Forget that, you do not need it now, put it aside, put it away. It landed on Bran's shoulder, and pecked at him, and the shining golden face was gone./

 

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3 hours ago, OtherFromAnotherMother said:

Does Bran know about the catspaw?

There's no indication in the text that he knows, but if he does, it's possible he found out off page and that he just never reflects on it that I remember. 

Edited by Widow's Watch

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14 hours ago, Widow's Watch said:

There's no indication in the text that he knows, but if he does, it's possible he found out off page and that he just never reflects on it that I remember. 

Would be kind of weird to think this didn’t happen really. Seems like the sort of thing that would crop up. For example if Bran asked why his mother had left. I just run with the assumption he was told off page

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17 hours ago, Helenas Musikautomat said:

Would be kind of weird to think this didn’t happen really. Seems like the sort of thing that would crop up. For example if Bran asked why his mother had left. I just run with the assumption he was told off page

It could be that he was told off page.

Although, I could see this information being withheld from him due to his young age. 

 

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20 hours ago, OtherFromAnotherMother said:

Although, I could see this information being withheld from him due to his young age. 

agree --- who is going to tell Bran your mom left WF to go find your father in KL, because some lackey tried to stab you as you lay in a comma. Your mother tried to save you from the intruder but the direwolf your mother banished from your room managed to save you.

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I think it is safe to say that he knows about the intruder. :)From ACOK, Bran I (emphasis mine):

 

"Summer never bit anyone"

"Summer ripped out a man's throat in this very chamber, or have you forgotten? The truth is, those sweet pups you and your brothers found in the snow have grown into dangerous beasts. The Frey boys are wise to be wary of them."

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3 hours ago, Rhaenys_Targaryen said:

I think it is safe to say that he knows about the intruder. :)From ACOK, Bran I (emphasis mine):

 

"Summer never bit anyone"

"Summer ripped out a man's throat in this very chamber, or have you forgotten? The truth is, those sweet pups you and your brothers found in the snow have grown into dangerous beasts. The Frey boys are wise to be wary of them."

@Rhaenys_Targaryen for the win!

Nice find!

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Sorry if this question has been posed before in the past (and I'm willing to bet it has been):

 

Is Waxley a knightly house or a 'lordly' house? There seems to be some contradiction on the asoiaf wiki and the novels where he is referred to twice as "Lord Waxley". in Alayne I and II.

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1 hour ago, Anarch Half-Hoare said:

Is Waxley a knightly house or a 'lordly' house? There seems to be some contradiction on the asoiaf wiki and the novels where he is referred to twice as "Lord Waxley". in Alayne I and II.

The AFFC Appendix mentions Edmund Waxley, the Knight of Wickenden, which implies they are landed knights. Sansa's chapters mention a Lord Waxley, however.

Most landed knights in the appendix have Ser as an honorific: 

Quote

 

Ser Harras Harlaw, the Knight of Grey Garden

Ser Damon Shett, Knight of Gull Tower

Ser Symond Templeton, the Knight of Ninestars

Ser Deziel Dalt, the Knight of Lemonwood

Ser Symon Santagar, the Knight of Spottswood

Ser Gerold Dayne, the Knight of High Hermitage

Ser Quincy Cox, the Knight of Saltpans

 

Curiously, Edmund Waxley the Knight of Wickenden, and Bennard Brune, the Knight of Brownhollow, do not have Ser honorifics in the appendix. Lothor Brune tells Sansa that the Brunes of Brownhollow are a knightly family, at least. 

Perhaps Edmund is a lord who goes by "Knight of Wickenden" for prestige purposes (maybe he is a famous knight?), but we don't know for certain. 

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On 6/20/2018 at 10:02 PM, Nittanian said:

The AFFC Appendix mentions Edmund Waxley, the Knight of Wickenden, which implies they are landed knights. Sansa's chapters mention a Lord Waxley, however.

Most landed knights in the appendix have Ser as an honorific: 

Curiously, Edmund Waxley the Knight of Wickenden, and Bennard Brune, the Knight of Brownhollow, do not have Ser honorifics in the appendix. Lothor Brune tells Sansa that the Brunes of Brownhollow are a knightly family, at least. 

Perhaps Edmund is a lord who goes by "Knight of Wickenden" for prestige purposes (maybe he is a famous knight?), but we don't know for certain. 

Lord is sometimes used to denote a rulet even though he's a landed knight.

Can't quote now but Catelyn counting templetıons among lordlings who took a Stark-Royce to bride and Haldon saying  Jon Connington is a  good prize for marriage becauae he is a great lord are two such cases.

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21 hours ago, Corvo the Crow said:

Lord is sometimes used to denote a rulet even though he's a landed knight.

...Jon Connington is a  good prize for marriage becauae he is a great lord...

To my best recollection, Jon Connington was not the "Knight of Griffin's Roost", but its lord. When Robert took the throne, much of the Connington lands were given to other Baratheon supporters and the Connington domains were reduced to knightly holdings. I do not recall that the text ever said that Jon's cousin, who succeeded him as head of House Connington, was raised to the title of lord, but Red Ronnet, definitely was only ever Ser Ronnet.

Now that he has retaken his ancestral seat, an argument could be made that he is now the "Knight of Griffin's Roost", but I think the point is moot. If Aegon ascends to the Iron Throne, then he is Lord Connington again, but who knows what will happen to the greyscale creeping up his arm.

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How common is crossbow in Westeros? After all low quality versions of that weapon could be "mass produced" so it should be available. Secondly it is much easier to use than long bow. Thirdly it would give an infantryman a chance against cavalry. Fourth it could be used in sieges. Fifth it could also used in hunting so even those peasants that could hunt without being accused of poaching could own a crossbow.

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On 6/20/2018 at 9:02 PM, Nittanian said:

The AFFC Appendix mentions Edmund Waxley, the Knight of Wickenden, which implies they are landed knights. Sansa's chapters mention a Lord Waxley, however.

George has gone on record stating that he doesn't draw up the appendices. If they are at odds with the novels (and there are no errors in the text of the novels at that point) they are correct, not the appendices.

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3 hours ago, Lord Varys said:

George has gone on record stating that he doesn't draw up the appendices.

Interesting, do you recall where/when he said that?

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