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Le Cygne

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  1. I found those articles interesting, particularly what could be learned from GRRM. From the GRRM episode clues article: GRRM gives a potential spoiler for TWOW, direwolves seem like they may play a big role in putting down Ramsay: [ [N.B. A note for future reference. A season or two down the line Ramsay’s pack of wolfhounds are going to be sent against the Stark direwolves, so we should build up the dogs as much as possible in this and subsequent episodes.]] GRRM didn't know Sansa's story would be gutted: Martin has Roose Bolton tell his bastard son: “We have a much better match in mind for you. A match to help House Bolton hold the north. Arya Stark.” GRRM wanted this in the show, but they cut it (Tyrion can do no wrong on the show): In the same scene in Martin’s version, Jaime also asks Tyrion to give Sansa back to Brienne so he can fulfill his promise to Catelyn. [Tyrion doesn't keep his promise in the books, and Brienne is appalled when she finds out.] From the other article (other non-GRRM show scripts): The sisters fight was real: The tensions between Arya and Sansa are also very real (until they’re not). When Arya accuses Sansa of trying to placate the Northern lords to ensure they are on her side, the script explains: “Arya is right. She knows it. We know it. Sansa knows it.” Later, Sansa gets genuinely enraged by her sister’s constant accusations: “Now she grows angry, and when Sansa gets angry a steeliness enters her tone.” None of these fights are for Baelish’s benefit. Why Sansa and Brienne broke up: Sansa gets ticked off watching her sister and Brienne spar in the courtyard, and worries Brienne might be an ally for her sister should Arya turn on Sansa. “Sansa is not happy about it” the script reads. Furthermore: “This disturbs Sansa; the woman she thought was her dedicated protector is actually a time share.” That’s why Sansa abruptly, and unkindly, sends Brienne away. Tyrion is in love with Dany: “He studies her face. [. . .] Dany is staring into the distance so Tyrion is able to watch her from up close. Goddamn but she is beautiful. [. . .] He watches her for a beat too long and turns away. Lost in her own thoughts, she doesn’t notice that he’s flustered,” the script described... “The brother he loves races towards his probably death at the hands of the queen Tyrion also loves,” as detailed in the script. Hints that Tyrion may be killed by a dragon: Of course, love isn’t the only emotion Tyrion feels for Daenerys. There’s also a healthy dose of fear there, especially as Daenerys burns Randyll and Dickon Tarly alive in “Eastwatch.” Inside Tyrion’s thoughts, the script links Daenerys to her pyromaniac dad, King Aerys Targaryen: “Their last, best hope is also her father’s daughter.” and from the GRRM script article: “Balerion, Vhagar, and Meraxes, are GIGANTIC, large enough to swallow Tyrion and Varys both in a single gulp, and still have room for an elephant or two”
  2. From A Natural History of the Romance Novel by Pamela Regis: The romance novel is old. The form is stable. Since the birth of the novel in English, the romance novel as I have defined it here - the story of the courtship, the betrothal of one or more heroines - has provided a form for novels. What is more, the form has attracted writers of acknowledged genius - Richardson, Austen, Bronte, Trollope, and Forster to name just the ones examined here. Using the eight essential elements of the romance novel form as identified - society defined, the meeting, the barrier, the attraction, the declaration, the point of ritual death, the recognition, and the betrothal - doubled, amplified, diminished, echoed, made as comic or as serious as context required - these and other canonical romance writers have employed this form to free their heroines from the barrier and free them to choose the hero. Joy and happiness, both for the heroine and hero, and for the reader, follow. Trollope, Forster, Richardson, Bronte, and Austen are in the literary canon and on required reading lists; the romance novels they wrote were best sellers in their day. The romance novel, as we have seen, is a species of comedy with the heroine displacing the hero as the central character. The great societal shifts toward affective individualism, property rights, and companionate marriage, coincide with the rise of the novel in English... The courtship novel, up to the twentieth century, is the story of the heroine's struggle for one or more of these great goals... The heroine's and hero's struggles in each of these novels are not trivial yet the tone in these novels is often lighthearted. When the outcome is freedom and joy, and in the romance novel these are the outcome, the tone can be light, even if the issues are serious. In the twentieth century the romance novel become the most popular form of the novel in North America. Rather than achieving affective individualism, property rights, and companionate marriage through courtship as the earlier heroines did, the twentieth-century heroine begins the novel with these in place. The book still focuses on her, but the hero steps forward to take an equal place with her. The novel chronicles the heroine's taming of the dangerous hero or her healing of the injured hero, or both. Taming and healing can work the other way as well. Heroines can need taming and healing, too... In chronicling the courtship through the eight essential elements of the romance novel, the twentieth-century romance focuses on emotion. Literature that focuses on emotion and that ends happily veers towards the sentimental. Romance novels are, therefore, profoundly out of step with the prevailing contemporary high culture simply because of this emotional sensibility. My litany throughout this book has been that, despite their quality, popular romance novels of the twentieth century might appear on the New York Times Best Sellers List, but they are never reviewed in the newspaper itself. Other popular forms - mystery, science fiction, and horror - are. Romance novels are excluded, I suspect, because of an ignorance of the form itself and of the sensibility - the reliance on emotion - that suffuses the form. Emotion is suspect. Emotion is especially suspect when it is joyful, and every romance novel ends in joy. The practical critics of prevailing high culture ignore romances. Academic critics, as we have seen, also condemn romances. I have already offered a defense of the romance, but would like to add one more observation here. The story of the courtship and betrothal of one or more heroines is, finally, about freedom and joy. In the twentieth century, for the most part, romances are stories written by woman and read by women. They feature women who have achieved the ends fostered by affective individualism, control over their own property, and companionate marriage. In other words, romance heroines make their own decisions, make their own livings, and choose their own husbands. I admit, unapologetically, that these values are profoundly bourgeois. I assert that they are the impossible dream of millions of women in many parts of the world today. To attack this very old genre, so stable in its form, so joyful in its celebration of freedom, is to discount, and perhaps even to deny, the most personal hopes of millions of women around the world. (fixed typos)
  3. From Beauty and the Beast: Diary of a Film by Jean Cocteau: I have decided to write a diary of La Belle et la Bête as the work on the film progresses. After a year of preparations and difficulties, the moment has now come to grapple with a dream. Apart from the numerous obstacles which exist in getting a dream onto celluloid, the problem is to make a film within the limits imposed by a period of austerity. But perhaps these limitations may stimulate imagination, which is often lethargic when all means are placed at its disposal. Everybody knows the story by madame Leprince de Beaumont, a story often attributed to Perrault, because it is found next to "Peau d'Ane" between those bewitching covers of the Bibliothèque Rose. The postulate of the story requires faith, the faith of childhood. I mean that one must believe implicitly at the very beginning and not question the possibility that the mere picking of a rose might lead a family into adventure, or that a man can be changed into a beast, and vice versa. Such enigmas offend grown-ups who are readily prejudiced, proud of their doubt, armed with derision. But I have the impudence to believe that the cinema which depicts the impossible is apt to carry conviction, in a way, and may be able to put a "singular" occurrence into the plural. It is up to us (that is, to me and my unit―in fact, one entity) to avoid those impossibilities which are even more of a jolt in the midst of the improbable than in the midst of reality. For fantasy has its own laws which are like those of perspective. You may not bring what is distant into the foreground, or render fuzzily what is near. The vanishing lines are impeccable and the orchestration so delicate that the slightest false note jars. I am not speaking of what I have achieved, but of what I shall attempt within the means at my disposal. My method is simple: not to aim at poetry. That must come of its own accord. The mere whispered mention of its name frightens it away. I shall try to build a table. It will be up to you then to eat at it, to examine it or to chop it up for firewood.
  4. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    My biggest fear is his father dies. It would be interesting to see what Mike would do if he caught them escaping to Canada. I would hope he'd let them go, Gus be damned.
  5. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    Yeah, I missed seeing Nacho in the finale. Maybe the Mike and Nacho stories could have converged, then circled back to Jimmy's story next season.
  6. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    Odenkirk: "At least that’s what he told himself eventually, there’s no way I’m getting in. As you can see in that one speech he gives to that young girl. He’s really talking to himself from 10 years before and he’s telling himself give up. Don’t even try. And it’s really sad because it’s heartbreaking. I feel like he’s just talking to a younger version of himself and every vestige of goodness that is remaining inside him, he’s shouting it down in that speech and it kills him to do it. And it’s heartbreaking to him. It breaks his own heart, too." Gould: "It’s wonderful how upbeat he is there... It seems like it gives him a feeling of power. It gives him a feeling of effectiveness. He’s intoxicated at the end of the episode, it’s a champagne moment for him. When you see Kim’s reaction, there’s so much to it. There’s concern, there’s confusion, but I get the feeling when I watched the scene that Kim maybe having a premonition, it almost feels like in her gut, she feels where this is going and maybe that’s not so good... "I think Jimmy’s story is a very different one from Walt’s because Walt was marked for death the first time we met him and as I said before where there’s life, there’s hope. Maybe the man who started off as Slippin’ Jimmy and James McGill and Saul Goodman and Gene, maybe he still has a shot at redemption. If we can find a way to tell that story, I think it’s a worthwhile story to tell." https://variety.com/2018/tv/news/better-call-saul-finale-season-4-bob-odenkirk-1202970629/ I'd sure like to see the Gene story. Something's gotta give, he can't go on that way...
  7. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    I agree, it was hard to suspend disbelief that Werner could be that naive. He was blindfolded to get in there, they are obviously breaking the law in a huge way, but hey, just run off. I also think Mike would have warned him more strongly before. I thought it was a good season, but I have a similar problem with Kim getting teary eyed over Jimmy's I hope I can be as good as Chuck bit. He was laying it on so thick, and she knows better than anyone how Chuck screwed Jimmy over. Maybe she could just see what it did to him, and it was hard to see that. I like the overall arc of the story, though. That he realized they'd never give him a chance, and he'd have to play it another way. And that he broke down when he realized this. Also three cheers for the goldfish...
  8. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    I'm listening to the BCS Insider Podcast, and Vince Gilligan said this: "It's always easier to make the characters be dumb just to get away with something. Don't ever take that shortcut. It is a terrible terrible terrible shortcut to take that you move the plot forward by a character being dumb. It's just a terrible shortcut, don't do it." Also here's the finale preview... Will Nacho and his dad make it out alive? Kim? Werner? The goldfish?
  9. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    The goldfish! I thought it might symbolize Jimmy's humanity. Will he forget to feed it? Will it jump out of the tank one day, and gasp for breath? Or will he keep it alive, that little spark of hope? Could just be a nice visual, but they just keep coming back to it, in nearly every episode.
  10. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    It's interesting that both Jimmy and Kim have a noble side, where they want to help people. But they also both have a wild side. In this case, they were genuinely righting a wrong, Huell really didn't know it was a cop, and was just defending a friend, of sorts. Jimmy will lose sight of his better nature, that's ahead. But that spark may still be there with Gene. He wanted to help the kid at the mall.
  11. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    I saw it coming, and I was hoping it would. She was bored with the Mesa Verde routine, while at the same time, she went along with how she got it (Jimmy's scam to get it back). They've shown this side of Jimmy turns her on from the start, they sure made it clear in season 2. This isn't the first time she's yanked him to her for a kiss after a successful scam. It means she's complex, and it also makes the storyline complex. Yeah, there's likely a fall for both ahead, but she's a key part of it, and that makes it all so much more interesting.
  12. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    "Let's do it again!" The buildup to that was so good, and it's been building up for several seasons, too. Perfect!
  13. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    I think it's been a really good season. Still worried about Kim, Nacho, and the goldfish making it out of this, though. Seems like this is about to bubble up to the surface: The character is not only layered and complex, Kim is someone who has dabbled in scammery with Jimmy — and proven herself to be rather adept at it. “She’s not a person who’s just there to be the voice of reason, or the voice of good, or the voice of balance,” continues Gould. “She is damn complicated in her own right, and these two people do things together that neither one of them would’ve done individually, and going back to Breaking Bad, there’s something about chemistry. These two elements mixed together make something new.” Season 4 of AMC’s Breaking Bad prequel just might show you another new side of Kim that is complicit in the illicit. (Notes Saul co-creator Vince Gilligan of one scheme that will be run later this season: “It’s one small slip for Jimmy, one big one for Kim.”) “Her lines in the sand are bizarre,” Seehorn hints to EW, adding: “Not only does it never seem like foreign territory to her, she seems to recognize that in others. It’s not like she loved Jimmy despite him being a con. There’s something to her backstory.” Odenkirk agrees, and he’s eager to explore her past. “The question is: is Jimmy this Svengali who’s making her do things she wouldn’t normally do? Or is it who she really is?” asks Odenkirk. “I believe she very much has this side of her. I’m always curious about her before we met her. What kind of crazy s— did she get up to? Because she was a natural and clicked into so quickly when Jimmy first came to her.” https://ew.com/tv/2018/09/17/better-call-saul-creator-jimmy-saul-goodman-kim/
  14. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    Yeah, they lost me on this. Doesn't seem very Kim, so I hope they revisit it.
  15. Le Cygne

    Better Call Saul -- Season 4 Better Get Emmy

    Interesting the turn they had Kim take this week. Jimmy may not be honest with himself, but Kim is not being honest with herself, either. She has the Mesa Verde account because Jimmy broke the rules. Now she's using Mesa Verde to partner with the ones who defended the Sandpiper scammers of the elderly, and saying this gives her time to help people. It's a contradiction.
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