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A True Kaniggit

The Drunk Thread: Just Look at the Flowers

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On 3/16/2019 at 5:03 AM, briantw said:

Picked up a bottle of Redbreast 12 for some St. Patrick's Day celebration tomorrow.  Hot damn I almost forgot how amazing Redbreast is.  I remember buying a bottle of it for the first time back in college and, even back then, thinking it was incredible.  I could just sip it all day.

Shame it's about twenty bucks more for a bottle than it was fifteen years ago, though. 

Surely you have more disposable income now than when you were in college? 

I wish I had a more sophisticated palate for spirits, or booze in general. I drink shite. 

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28 minutes ago, BigFatCoward said:

Surely you have more disposable income now than when you were in college? 

I wish I had a more sophisticated palate for spirits, or booze in general. I drink shite. 

Well yeah, but seventy bucks for a bottle is still what I would consider on the pricier side of your mid-range whiskeys.  Obviously there are far more expensive bottles, but most of the stuff I buy is in the 30-60 range. 

And the best way to develop your palate is to just try new stuff.  If you just drink the same stuff all the time, you'll never find out if you might like something else more.

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On 2/25/2019 at 3:12 PM, briantw said:

Have you tried Glenfiddich's IPA barrel one?  I noticed it last time I was at the liquor store and was thinking about picking up a bottle this weekend.

I have not tried that one yet. I originally cut my teeth on Glenfiddich back in the day, but hadn't had it in a while as my palate had developed and I didn't like the 12 year as much as I used to. But I may have to try out some more of their offerings after enjoying the Reserva so much.

I went to the bar the other day and had a glass of Lagavulin 16 and remembered what a damn fine whisky that is. Has anyone ever tried Bruichladdich's Octomore? I've really been wanting to try it out, but have been hesitant on pulling the trigger on it due to its high price point. 

Edited by The Great Unwashed

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45 minutes ago, The Great Unwashed said:

I have not tried that one yet. I originally cut my teeth on Glenfiddich back in the day, but hadn't had it in a while as my palate had developed and I didn't like the 12 year as much as I used to. But I may have to try out some more of their offerings after enjoying the Reserva so much.

I did end up buying a bottle.  Shared it with a couple of friends last week.  It was enjoyable and unique.  You can definitely tell that it's Glenfiddich, as it's got a similar profile to 12, but it's also different enough to be worth trying.  It's a bit pricey at 70 bucks with no age statement, and probably not something I'll buy again, but I don't regret getting a bottle.  I'm planning to just hold onto what's left and drink it when I have friends over since it's an easy drinker and a conversation piece as the only scotch aged in IPA barrels (or at least the first...not sure if anyone else has tried).  

I've not tried Octomore.  I'm really only just getting into scotch.  Was mostly a bourbon and occasional Irish whiskey man until recently, outside of occasionally trying a single malt at a bar or buying a bottle of Walker Black.  I got a bottle of Laphroaig 10 recently and it is just delightful.  Tastes like a maraschino cherry filtered through a bonfire.  Next stop: Ardbeg.

Also Lagavulin 16 is on my list.  My next few purchases are probably going to be: Ardbeg 10, High West Bourye, Green Spot, and Lagavulin.  Not gonna be a cheap month.  :lol:

I've been buying a bottle or two a week for the past two months, though, and the bar I'm putting together is coming along nicely.  I started out heavy on the bourbon, since that was what I knew, but I'm branching out into scotch and Irish stuff now.  I also always used to drink things with rocks, but when I started with the bar I decided I was just gonna spend two weeks drinking things neat.  Worked wonders.  Once I got used to it, I found I prefer most things without the ice.  

Anyway, if you have another scotch suggestions, feel free to offer them.  In my bar right now, I have Glenfiddich 12, Glenfiddich IPA Cask, Dalmore 12, and Laphroaig 10 and the Laphroaig is by far my favorite, if that gives you an idea of where my preferences go.  I'd probably rank them Laphroaig, Glenfiddich IPA, Dalmore, Glen 12, although Dalmore and Glen 12 are more or less a coin flip for me.

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1 hour ago, briantw said:

I did end up buying a bottle.  Shared it with a couple of friends last week.  It was enjoyable and unique.  You can definitely tell that it's Glenfiddich, as it's got a similar profile to 12, but it's also different enough to be worth trying.  It's a bit pricey at 70 bucks with no age statement, and probably not something I'll buy again, but I don't regret getting a bottle.  I'm planning to just hold onto what's left and drink it when I have friends over since it's an easy drinker and a conversation piece as the only scotch aged in IPA barrels (or at least the first...not sure if anyone else has tried).  

I've not tried Octomore.  I'm really only just getting into scotch.  Was mostly a bourbon and occasional Irish whiskey man until recently, outside of occasionally trying a single malt at a bar or buying a bottle of Walker Black.  I got a bottle of Laphroaig 10 recently and it is just delightful.  Tastes like a maraschino cherry filtered through a bonfire.  Next stop: Ardbeg.

Also Lagavulin 16 is on my list.  My next few purchases are probably going to be: Ardbeg 10, High West Bourye, Green Spot, and Lagavulin.  Not gonna be a cheap month.  :lol:

I've been buying a bottle or two a week for the past two months, though, and the bar I'm putting together is coming along nicely.  I started out heavy on the bourbon, since that was what I knew, but I'm branching out into scotch and Irish stuff now.  I also always used to drink things with rocks, but when I started with the bar I decided I was just gonna spend two weeks drinking things neat.  Worked wonders.  Once I got used to it, I found I prefer most things without the ice.  

Anyway, if you have another scotch suggestions, feel free to offer them.  In my bar right now, I have Glenfiddich 12, Glenfiddich IPA Cask, Dalmore 12, and Laphroaig 10 and the Laphroaig is by far my favorite, if that gives you an idea of where my preferences go.  I'd probably rank them Laphroaig, Glenfiddich IPA, Dalmore, Glen 12, although Dalmore and Glen 12 are more or less a coin flip for me.

Oh, if you love the Laphroaig 10 then I've got some suggestions for you! 

I'd definitely go with the Lagavulin first. Then I'd personally suggest the Uigeadail from Ardbeg over the Ardbeg 10. It doesn't have an age profile, but it's a cask strength whiskey and more heavily peated than the 10 year. Both are good buys though if price isn't much of an issue. After that, I'd recommend the Laphroaig Quarter Cask, if just to contrast with the 10 year. I've not tried their 15 year offering but I've heard it's very good. Also, the Talisker 10 and Caol Ila 12 are good choices. 

What are some Irish whiskeys and some bourbons you'd recommend? I've been looking to branch out beyond whiskys but I don't really have any idea where to start.

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31 minutes ago, The Great Unwashed said:

I'd definitely go with the Lagavulin first. Then I'd personally suggest the Uigeadail from Ardbeg over the Ardbeg 10. It doesn't have an age profile, but it's a cask strength whiskey and more heavily peated than the 10 year. Both are good buys though if price isn't much of an issue. After that, I'd recommend the Laphroaig Quarter Cask, if just to contrast with the 10 year. I've not tried their 15 year offering but I've heard it's very good. Also, the Talisker 10 and Caol Ila 12 are good choices. 

Good to know.  I'll see if my local store has the Uigeadail.  Charlotte ABC stores have terrible scotch selections, but there are a couple of stores just over the border in South Carolina that have much better selections.  I'll likely check out the rest of those options sooner or later too.  :lol:

31 minutes ago, The Great Unwashed said:

What are some Irish whiskeys and some bourbons you'd recommend? I've been looking to branch out beyond whiskys but I don't really have any idea where to start.

So I don't know a whole lot about Irish whiskey, but Redbreast 12 is awesome.  Don't go in expecting an Islay style scotch, though.  They are very different.  Redbreast is very smooth and it has an oily texture that almost tastes creamy.  Green Spot is good as well.  It's been ages since I had it, but I'm planning to buy a bottle soon.  Other than those plus Jameson and Bushmills (which you've likely had and are both perfectly solid whiskeys), I don't have a ton of experience with it.

Bourbon, though, I've got a ton of experience with.  I'll give some suggestions here, but if you reply with some bourbons you like, I might be able to steer you to some similar taste profiles.  I'm going to lump ryes in with bourbon as well.  

As far as I go, some of my favorites:
High West Double Rye - 35 bucks and it's probably the best rye I've had.  Half the price of Whistlepig and better imo.
Jefferson's Reserve - Runs about 50 bucks, but it's one of my favorites.  Standard Jefferson's is, to me, a perfect entry-level bourbon (super easy to drink) but a little bland.  Reserve takes it up a notch.  I really need to try their aged at sea variation.
Knob Creek - So I love pretty much every variety of Knob Creek I've had.  The standard, the 100 proof, and the 120 proof are all great.  Right now I've got a bottle of the 120 proof single barrel.  It's got a lot of bite, but it's great.  Plus, none of them break the bank.  Standard is 30 bucks and the Single Barrel only cost me 42.
Booker's - It's on the higher end of mid-range bourbon at around 70 bucks, but it's very good, especially if you like higher proof stuff.
Eagle Rare - Not sure how much this is, as I haven't seen it in stock anywhere nearby in a while, but it's quality.

Also, everyone love's Buffalo Trace if you can find it.  It's tough to get around here because of how popular it is, but it's a pretty classic bourbon.  Doesn't do anything particularly amazing but the price plus the flavor is a good value, as is the case for a ton of bourbon in that 20-40 price range.  

I'm sure other people have a ton of good recommendations as well.  There are far more bourbons I haven't tried than I have, but those are some of the ones I enjoy a lot that you won't have to invest a ton of money in to try out.  To be honest, one of things I love about bourbon is that there are just so many great options at very reasonable prices.  Even really cheap stuff tends to be drinkable, if lacking in complexity.  Given that you're a veteran scotch drinker, you may want to target the higher ABV stuff when checking out bourbon, as it tends to be aged longer and, thus, has a bit more complexity.  

That said, I'm not an ABV snob and pretty much just drink what I like.  I don't care if it's 80 proof or 120 as long as I enjoy drinking it.  Just think the higher ABV stuff may appeal to you switching over from scotch.

Edited by briantw

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15 hours ago, briantw said:

Good to know.  I'll see if my local store has the Uigeadail.  Charlotte ABC stores have terrible scotch selections, but there are a couple of stores just over the border in South Carolina that have much better selections.  I'll likely check out the rest of those options sooner or later too.  :lol:

So I don't know a whole lot about Irish whiskey, but Redbreast 12 is awesome.  Don't go in expecting an Islay style scotch, though.  They are very different.  Redbreast is very smooth and it has an oily texture that almost tastes creamy.  Green Spot is good as well.  It's been ages since I had it, but I'm planning to buy a bottle soon.  Other than those plus Jameson and Bushmills (which you've likely had and are both perfectly solid whiskeys), I don't have a ton of experience with it.

Bourbon, though, I've got a ton of experience with.  I'll give some suggestions here, but if you reply with some bourbons you like, I might be able to steer you to some similar taste profiles.  I'm going to lump ryes in with bourbon as well.  

As far as I go, some of my favorites:
High West Double Rye - 35 bucks and it's probably the best rye I've had.  Half the price of Whistlepig and better imo.
Jefferson's Reserve - Runs about 50 bucks, but it's one of my favorites.  Standard Jefferson's is, to me, a perfect entry-level bourbon (super easy to drink) but a little bland.  Reserve takes it up a notch.  I really need to try their aged at sea variation.
Knob Creek - So I love pretty much every variety of Knob Creek I've had.  The standard, the 100 proof, and the 120 proof are all great.  Right now I've got a bottle of the 120 proof single barrel.  It's got a lot of bite, but it's great.  Plus, none of them break the bank.  Standard is 30 bucks and the Single Barrel only cost me 42.
Booker's - It's on the higher end of mid-range bourbon at around 70 bucks, but it's very good, especially if you like higher proof stuff.
Eagle Rare - Not sure how much this is, as I haven't seen it in stock anywhere nearby in a while, but it's quality.

Also, everyone love's Buffalo Trace if you can find it.  It's tough to get around here because of how popular it is, but it's a pretty classic bourbon.  Doesn't do anything particularly amazing but the price plus the flavor is a good value, as is the case for a ton of bourbon in that 20-40 price range.  

I'm sure other people have a ton of good recommendations as well.  There are far more bourbons I haven't tried than I have, but those are some of the ones I enjoy a lot that you won't have to invest a ton of money in to try out.  To be honest, one of things I love about bourbon is that there are just so many great options at very reasonable prices.  Even really cheap stuff tends to be drinkable, if lacking in complexity.  Given that you're a veteran scotch drinker, you may want to target the higher ABV stuff when checking out bourbon, as it tends to be aged longer and, thus, has a bit more complexity.  

That said, I'm not an ABV snob and pretty much just drink what I like.  I don't care if it's 80 proof or 120 as long as I enjoy drinking it.  Just think the higher ABV stuff may appeal to you switching over from scotch.

Yeah, I'm not familiar with how the state-run liquor stores determine their stock, but you might check on ordering whisky from online distributors like The Whisky Exchange (if your state allows it; mine doesn't).

One thing I'd suggest, since Scotch has quite a bit of a higher price point, on average, than whiskeys, is to find a bar in your area that specializes in whiskys. They're usually happy to guide you to selections that fit your taste profile, and you can sample several different ones without shelling out $60-80 minimum on something you may not enjoy.

It sounds like I would definitely enjoy the Redbreast, even if it's different than what I'm used to, since you describe that same oily mouth texture that I love in the Uigeadail.

I have tried Jameson and Bushmills, neither of which were my cup of tea when I was younger, but I'll have to go back and re-experience them now.

And this seems like an excellent starting list for bourbons and ryes. Unfortunately, my only experiences with bourbon has been with JD, Jim Beam and Wild Turkey, so I'm excited to branch out into something new. And the price points of the bourbons compared to even middling quality whiskys just can't be beat.

You mention not being much of an ABV snob when it comes to your bourbons. I confess to being one when it comes to my whiskys. My 2 biggest criteria are the ABV (I wouldn't suggest anything under 46% ABV as anything less tends to water down the flavors too much imo, although you'll still find some that are the exception to the rule...the Laphroaig 10 is one example. Non-chill filtered is my other snobby criteria, as it retains that oily texture and the lingering finish better in my opinion (again, you'll find exceptions). 

I encourage you to continue drinking your first drams of any particular whisky you sample neat, as that gives you the fullest flavor profile in my opinion, although you have those who argue that a drop or two of filtered water helps open up the nose and flavor profile (it just waters it down in my opinion...I tried doing that once with the Uigeadail after I'd already sampled it neat, and it lost that oily texture I'd enjoyed so much). But, I'm sure you'll figure out for yourself how best you like your whisky served.

Thanks for the suggestions: I can't wait to start trying them out!

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1 hour ago, The Great Unwashed said:

Yeah, I'm not familiar with how the state-run liquor stores determine their stock, but you might check on ordering whisky from online distributors like The Whisky Exchange (if your state allows it; mine doesn't).

One thing I'd suggest, since Scotch has quite a bit of a higher price point, on average, than whiskeys, is to find a bar in your area that specializes in whiskys. They're usually happy to guide you to selections that fit your taste profile, and you can sample several different ones without shelling out $60-80 minimum on something you may not enjoy.

It sounds like I would definitely enjoy the Redbreast, even if it's different than what I'm used to, since you describe that same oily mouth texture that I love in the Uigeadail.

I have tried Jameson and Bushmills, neither of which were my cup of tea when I was younger, but I'll have to go back and re-experience them now.

And this seems like an excellent starting list for bourbons and ryes. Unfortunately, my only experiences with bourbon has been with JD, Jim Beam and Wild Turkey, so I'm excited to branch out into something new. And the price points of the bourbons compared to even middling quality whiskys just can't be beat.

You mention not being much of an ABV snob when it comes to your bourbons. I confess to being one when it comes to my whiskys. My 2 biggest criteria are the ABV (I wouldn't suggest anything under 46% ABV as anything less tends to water down the flavors too much imo, although you'll still find some that are the exception to the rule...the Laphroaig 10 is one example. Non-chill filtered is my other snobby criteria, as it retains that oily texture and the lingering finish better in my opinion (again, you'll find exceptions). 

I encourage you to continue drinking your first drams of any particular whisky you sample neat, as that gives you the fullest flavor profile in my opinion, although you have those who argue that a drop or two of filtered water helps open up the nose and flavor profile (it just waters it down in my opinion...I tried doing that once with the Uigeadail after I'd already sampled it neat, and it lost that oily texture I'd enjoyed so much). But, I'm sure you'll figure out for yourself how best you like your whisky served.

Thanks for the suggestions: I can't wait to start trying them out!

Yeah I pretty much just drink everything neat now, although I do mix bourbon with Coke sometimes or make an Old Fashioned or Manhattan, both of which are easy to make at home.  Once summer hits I may occasionally break out a giant ice cube, as it's nice to sit out at the dog park attached to my apartment building with something cold.

As far as Jameson and Bushmills go, they are fine.  I don't really recommended them specifically, but they aren't bad.  They are basically a blend of traditional Irish single pot still whiskey (like Redbreast or Green Spot) and grain alcohol, but you can still pick out the unique pot still flavor.  It's just muted and watered down.  Neither are bad, though.  I liken them to some of the bourbons you mentioned like Beam and Wild Turkey.  Perfectly fine, nothing exceptional.

And yeah I definitely need to find a good scotch bar around here.  Easy to find bourbons in bars in the South but not so much with scotch.  Need to go back to Savannah, as there is an amazing Scottish pub there I've been to.

 

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So I tried mixing Laphroaig 10 with Coke and dear god it is incredible.  I could drink this forever until the end of time and be happy.  Having tasted this, I'm fairly certain everything else I ever taste will be inferior.  It's like drinking a cherry Coke with a mesquite BBQ aftertaste, which sounds terrible but somehow is not.  

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On 3/18/2019 at 10:22 PM, briantw said:

So I tried mixing Laphroaig 10 with Coke and dear god it is incredible.

Dang. I missed a joke here.

 

Edit: ugh.

Edited by A True Kaniggit

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On 3/17/2019 at 7:16 PM, The Great Unwashed said:

Oh, if you love the Laphroaig 10 then I've got some suggestions for you! 

I'd definitely go with the Lagavulin first. Then I'd personally suggest the Uigeadail from Ardbeg over the Ardbeg 10. It doesn't have an age profile, but it's a cask strength whiskey and more heavily peated than the 10 year. Both are good buys though if price isn't much of an issue. After that, I'd recommend the Laphroaig Quarter Cask, if just to contrast with the 10 year. I've not tried their 15 year offering but I've heard it's very good. Also, the Talisker 10 and Caol Ila 12 are good choices. 

What are some Irish whiskeys and some bourbons you'd recommend? I've been looking to branch out beyond whiskys but I don't really have any idea where to start.

Don't forget about Talisker :) That's another good peaty scotch.

Teeling single malt is an amazing Irish Whiskey, Tulimore Dew also has some decent options.

I 2nd the Knob Creek for a good bourbon, but I think my favorite is Woodford Reserve.  Bourbon's are pretty fun to experiment with because you can find some gems that would be considered in the cheap range for Scotch or Irish whiskey.

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On 3/17/2019 at 5:23 PM, briantw said:

Anyway, if you have another scotch suggestions, feel free to offer them.  In my bar right now, I have Glenfiddich 12, Glenfiddich IPA Cask, Dalmore 12, and Laphroaig 10 and the Laphroaig is by far my favorite, if that gives you an idea of where my preferences go.  I'd probably rank them Laphroaig, Glenfiddich IPA, Dalmore, Glen 12, although Dalmore and Glen 12 are more or less a coin flip for me.

Quick question I've had for a while. Lot's of scotches begin with "Glen." Is that a brand that covers a lot of different scotches or a distilling style? 

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2 hours ago, aceluby said:

Don't forget about Talisker :) That's another good peaty scotch.

Teeling single malt is an amazing Irish Whiskey, Tulimore Dew also has some decent options.

I 2nd the Knob Creek for a good bourbon, but I think my favorite is Woodford Reserve.  Bourbon's are pretty fun to experiment with because you can find some gems that would be considered in the cheap range for Scotch or Irish whiskey.

I picked up a bottle of Talisker about a month ago.  Like it a lot.  It's like Azor Ahai...salt and smoke.  Of the scotches I've tried, I'd probably rank it behind Lagavulin 16 and Ardbeg Uigeadail for sure, and maybe Laphroaig 10.

Woodford is great at the 30 dollar price point.  One of my go-tos along with Knob Creek.  

Heaven's Door Tennessee Bourbon is fantastic (and has a gorgeous bottle), although a bit pricey at around fifty bucks.  

Finally got my hands on a bottle of Buffalo Trace recently as well and it's as good as I remembered, especially for the 27 bucks it set me back.  Just wish it wasn't like pulling teeth to find a bottle in these parts.

21 minutes ago, Tywin et al. said:

Quick question I've had for a while. Lot's of scotches begin with "Glen." Is that a brand that covers a lot of different scotches or a distilling style? 

I believe Glen is the Scottish word for a highland valley, much like Loch is lake.  

A google search has confirmed that Glenfiddich and Glenmorangie (the first two glens I thought of) at least are owned by different companies.

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1 hour ago, Tywin et al. said:

Quick question I've had for a while. Lot's of scotches begin with "Glen." Is that a brand that covers a lot of different scotches or a distilling style? 

@briantw is correct about "glen" meaning valley, but in addition to that, for many of the "glen" whiskys, they're named after the river in the valley that provides the water source for their whisky. So there's a River Fiddich for the Glenfiddich distillery and a River Livet for the Glenlivet distillery, and I know there's at least one or two more that I'm not remembering right now.

But the names are basically descriptions of places, kind of like how we have so many place names with "valley" in them (Death Valley, Silicon Valley, Napa Valley, etc.).

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14 hours ago, briantw said:

I believe Glen is the Scottish word for a highland valley, much like Loch is lake.  

A google search has confirmed that Glenfiddich and Glenmorangie (the first two glens I thought of) at least are owned by different companies.

 

14 hours ago, The Great Unwashed said:

@briantw is correct about "glen" meaning valley, but in addition to that, for many of the "glen" whiskys, they're named after the river in the valley that provides the water source for their whisky. So there's a River Fiddich for the Glenfiddich distillery and a River Livet for the Glenlivet distillery, and I know there's at least one or two more that I'm not remembering right now.

But the names are basically descriptions of places, kind of like how we have so many place names with "valley" in them (Death Valley, Silicon Valley, Napa Valley, etc.).

Much appreciated. I picked up one I had never heard of before, GlenDronach, and it’s excellent. A little pricey, but well worth it so long as I can keep my friends from taking shots from it.

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On 4/30/2019 at 8:48 AM, Tywin et al. said:

 

Much appreciated. I picked up one I had never heard of before, GlenDronach, and it’s excellent. A little pricey, but well worth it so long as I can keep my friends from taking shots from it.

You need better friends ;)

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14 hours ago, aceluby said:

You need better friends ;)

We all have friends that don’t understand the finer parts of life.

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Nerds.  This semester is almost over for all my colleagues.

I have a month left.

Was at work from 930-1230am today.  I miss you guys.  Right now, I needed a vodka dinner.

AN ALL THE VODKA DINNER.

Since I didn't want to be declasse, there's a lime wedge in this vodka.  Back in very early.  Love y'all and miss you.

 

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British people get drunk more often than everyone else in the world, study reveals

 

Cheers, to all the Britons who frequent this forum.  :cheers:

 

Quote

According to a report examining the drinking habits of 36 countries last year, Britons reported getting drunk an average of 51.1 times in a 12-month period, which accounts for almost once a week.

 

 

 

 

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Just stumbled across this thread and reading the previous page I wanna pass a hi five to all my fellow Scotch drinkers.

I'm mostly a bourbon guy since I'm in the states and it's not always affordable, but I love it when I can get it.  I'm a huge Laphroaig nut, and absolutely LOVE the Quarter Cask as a sipper.  I've also enjoyed 10 Year Old, Select, Triple Wood, two different batches of Cask Strength, and currently am sitting on a bottle of Select and one of the exclusives that was finished in a Sherry cask.  If you dig the smoke punch but feel like you roll through a bottle of it too fast, I've learned that you can make cocktails with the Cask Strength that are to die for.  The Scotch Old Fashioned is terrific with good cherries, and the Rob Roy is fantastic and really helps stretch the Scotch out.

That said, just dribbling a bit in a Glenncairn, putting a drop or two of water in it and sipping it slowly with any of them is a true pleasure for a peat/smoke lover.

As far as other scotch, I dig Ardbeg a lot, though have only had the 10 year.  Lagavulin is really nice, but after my love of Laphroaig grew it seems kind of tame to me.  Glennfiddich 12 is a nice smooth one if you're looking for easy drinking.  Had a bottle of Johnny Walker Blue purchased for me for my 40th birthday and that was something for a blend.  Definitely an easy sipper, but with plenty of flavors throughout.  Surprisingly sweet for a scotch as well.  

I'm all over the place with other whisk(e)ys as well.  Love Bushmills Black.  Redbreast is great.  Dig Crown Royal XO for it's amazing flavor profile.  Evan Williams when I'm feeling stingy in the pocket book.  I find Jack Daniels just annoys me too much to enjoy, which tends to really get to my fellow musicans since EVERYBODY is supposed to love Jack Daniels in the rock world.  Meh.  Jim Beam Black was my staple for a number of years.  Wild Turkey 101 is a STUPENDOUS whiskey for cocktails.  I really dig about any barrel proof or 100+ proof bourbon.  Old Grandad 114 trips my trigger every time.  I can sip it, but find it makes terrific old fashions.  Also, Jim Beam bonded is a good cocktail hitter.

And then what my friends lovingly refer to as "hobo scotch," the lower shelf blends.  Dewars and Cutty Sark make the rounds sometimes.

And for cheapo Irish, 2 Gingers is surprisingly tasty.

I find the stories behind scotches to be fascinating.  The storied history between the Laphroaig distillery and the Lagavulin distillery have all sorts of mischief and mayhem.  There's even a story about how one of the brothers involved in Laphroaig's early days turned up dead in one of the vats and it was always suspected one of the people in Lagavulin's employ had done him in.  It sounds like they get along much better these days, but I'd love the chance to travel there and hear it from people that actually know the real history of the places.  Plus fill my own bottles at every distillery on Islay.  Man I love Islay scotch.

I need to get ahold of some Talisker Storm.  I've been told that's pretty fantastic too.

Sorry for writing a book here.  This just happens to be one of my favorite subjects.

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