Astromech

April 2018 Reads

47 posts in this topic

5 hours ago, aceluby said:

Reading 'Black Prism' by Brent Weeks.  I enjoyed his other series quite a bit due to the fast paced action, and despite some pretty glaring faults.  About 50 pages in and have yet to have it grip me at all, and after reading Hobb for the last few weeks the prose is.... not good.  Hoping it picks up because this has started out like a Sanderson book in all the worst ways.

Not sure if you saw some of my mentions, but i ended up finishing this one and am still interested in hate-discussing it.  Please let me know if you finish.  

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14 hours ago, SkynJay said:

I started Ship of Destiny today as I continue to work through Hobb. Loved Mad Ship, to think i almost skipped this series and went strait to Tawny Man.  Glad i didn't.

Don't skip any of them.  The payout is worth it in the end and the stories are amazing.  I feel like you'd miss SO much of the story if you skipped those or Rain Wilds.

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On 4/17/2018 at 4:41 AM, Mexal said:

I liked the idea of Lyria, if only because I think it would have been useful to see the aftermath of "gaining their freedom". The idea of freedom is a lot better than the reality.

I definitely agree with that, I would have just preferred another color.  I guess red was the bottom of the pyramid and therefore the biggest post-freedom story to tell, but we’ve already seen plenty of red.  

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Finished Traitor’s Blade by Sebastien De Castell, first in the Greatcoats series.  It’s a fantasy (very minor magic, basically just an alternative world version of 17th century France) very similar to The Three Musketeers without D’Artagnian.  The Greatcoats duel with rapiers as they face off against lawless brigands and especially the soldiers of corrupt aristocratic authorities who have undermined the noble ideal of the king’s justice by devolving from an attempt at a centralized monarchy.  It’s almost like propaganda for Louis XIV mixed with a story of nation building.  The evil aristocracy oppressed the people but the rightful king would restore justice and rule of law.

It’s told from a single POV narrated in the first person.  The prose is pretty good but the style definitely tends toward melodramatic anguish to emphasize the righteousness of rule of law.  Characterization is limited outside of the POV.  The three central characters have the comedic by-play of longtime friends without it feeling forced or too modern.

It’s not bad, and possibly even good if it wasn’t a repetitive style after Iron Gold, but it didn’t leave me eager to read the rest of the series. 

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H.W. Brand's The Age of Gold: The California Gold Rush and the New American Dream. Even though it was broader and not as deep as I expected, it was very good. I initially thought it would be more detailed  concerning the actual experience and events in the mining camps. However, it was really concerned more with the broader effects the California Gold Rush had on both the U.S. and globally, covering primarily the 1840s to beginning of the 20th C. Of course, the author also draws parallels to recent events like the tech boom in Silicon Valley. It was interesting to read just how significant the discovery of gold was, from the acceleration of California's statehood and it's effects on the issue of slavery to the psychological effect it had on the nation and globally. 

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I finished William Miller and the Rise of Adventism by George R. Knight on Monday, it was really thorough and very enlightening.

Also on Monday I started The Martian by Andy Weir, I'm really into the book and even though I know how it ends (I didn't see the movie but it's really easy to guess how it will) that doesn't diminish how much I'm enjoying the read so far.

This past Saturday I finished Loony Coon by Sam Campbell, which is the eighth book of his Living Forest series.  I'll be starting the ninth, Fiddlesticks and Freckles this coming Friday as my weekend read for the next two weeks.

And today I started Let's Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir) by Jenny Lawson (aka The Bloggess) as my home read, which is I'll read at least 10 pages a day but at home only.  I read Lawson's second book Furiously Happy several years ago and enjoyed it so much I had to get her first.  My current home read of Walt Whitman is non-existent and I need to have a home read that I'm actually progression on, so I decided to just start the next book on my home list.  Whitman is my last book of poetry, which isn't mythological in nature, and whenever I do finish it (probably 2020 at the rate I'm going) it'll be my last.

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