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Watch, Watched, Watching: Midsommar Night Blues

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I have to give Dark another go. I watched like 2-3 episodes a while back and just stopped for whatever reason. 

I breezed through S1 of Penny Dreadful this week. It’s so damn good, and I kinda love Eva Green. 

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Saw John Wick 3 again yesterday. Some friends back home had not seen it, so I didn't mind going again. The action is still amazing and I appreciate that they keep the silly worldbuilding mercifully short :D

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Posted (edited)

Watched Under the Silver Lake. Saw it was by the same director that did It Follows (which I love) so I was curious. It was...very strange. Not quite David Lynch level, but it’s out there. It’s a neo-noir staring Andrew Garfield. Kind of reminded me a bit of The Big Lebowski and Inherent Vice (being set in LA and having him looking for a missing woman), although I wouldn’t put it up there with those movies in terms of quality. It was interesting though. There’s one particular scene with a songwriter in a mansion that’s worth watching it for alone. 

Edited by Nictarion

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Thanks for opening the new thread for this commentary!

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7 hours ago, Nictarion said:

Watched Under the Silver Lake. Saw it was by the same director that did It Follows (which I love) so I was curious. It was...very strange. Not quite David Lynch level, but it’s out there. It’s a neo-noir staring Andrew Garfield. Kind of reminded me a bit of The Big Lebowski and Inherent Vice (being set in LA and having him looking for a missing woman), although I wouldn’t put it up there with those movies in terms of quality. It was interesting though. There’s one particular scene with a songwriter in a mansion that’s worth watching it for alone. 

I was excited for this when it first came out, since I’ll watch basically anything from A24, but the lackluster reviews kinda turned me off. I just gotta bite the bullet I guess. Although I didn’t care for Inherent Vice

 

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I had free time so I went back to Dark. After watching a few more episodes it was easier to follow.

Spoiler

The issue I was having was remembering who was who in the timelines and how they were tied together, once my mind put them all together it was better. Man...I am your daughter, and your mother! I am your nephew, your lover and your killer ultimately!

If you are someone who doesn't mind doing a rewatch I would recommend it. I think it would make S2 easier to get into.

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Saw Fences tonight, with Viola Davis and Denzel Washington.

The acting is extraordinary in this drama.

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Went to see Midsommar yesterday as part of my birthday weekend celebrations. Ironically I had not been to the cinema since watching Hereditary.

Even though it isn't 'scary' in the way that Hereditary was, it is equally disturbing. As I am working on finally finishing The Golden Bough (started it about 20 years ago!) it was fun to see some of the 'magical' practices from there referenced in the film. I am very much still processing the film 24 hours later. I slept really badly last night and I am not sure how much of it is down to an excessive weekend and how much of it is this bloody film getting stuck in my head. The film looks amazing, the whole midnight sun thing with the excessive brightness, glares and glints - it's certainly a different type of horror. 

The other weird thing is that

for a horror film with some really bad things happening to people you end up feeling pretty much ok with things by the end of it, like a sense of completeness and catharsis. Although admittedly I fail to see how anyone could be saddened by the dudebros.

I might be able to watch it again in a few years time.

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Fortunately, a Turkish American woman from whom I bought a thumb ring / bow string guard some time back, informed me that the second season of The Magnificent Century is entirely available on Youtube with English subtitles. I desired seasons 2 and 3, but netflix, which had started Ottoman history delving, with season one of the MC, and Ertugrul, just -- did not. The Magnificent Century is the fictionalized adventure-biography story of Süleyman the Magnificent, which, particularly in season 1, centers the political rivalries and manueverings of the harem.  Central to that is the formerly Christian slave kidnapped, maybe from Anatolia or elsewhere, who eventually marries the Emperor, even though it had long been the custom of the Ottoman rulers to not marry, merely father as many children as possible.

The fabrics and textiles and jewels and horses and palaces and intrigue are indeed magnificent. And since encountering season 1 I've learned so much history to all this that I didn't have then, it's all so much more fun. I know that Süleyman did indeed poke the Spanish-Hapsburg Emperor to release France's King Francois from prison in Spain.  I know how closely allied already in the 16th century were the French crown and the Ottoman empire.

Coming right up: The Battle of Mohacs (1526) and the end of Hungary's Louis II, and the partition of it between the Ottomans, the Hapsburgs and -- the Principality of Transylvania -- for centuries. 

Again, I wouldn't have known just how significant this was if I hadn't earlier in this year or last year or sometime learned how frackin' wealthy Hungary was in the middle ages, due to their gold and silver mines -- providing most of the gold and silver to Europe and even the middle east during those centuries. So when Süleyman  has all the classic sculpture at Louis II's palace in Buda shipped back to Istanbul, and wagon train upon wagon train of gold and silver everything else too, I Got It. Which is why I guess, all these reasons, the Battle of Mohacs is called the end of the middle ages for Hungary. It never again regained the place on the European - Middle Eastern historical stage it held since about the 12th century. 

(However, a subplot has shown up, which is entirely fictional, not at all historical. A Castillan Infanta, engaged to a son of the Hapsburgs, has been captured by Ottoman pirates. This never happened. But we get to see Venice manuevering here ....) 

This is exactly what somebody who is suffering -- and I do mean suffering! -- from a nasty summer cold should have.
 

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Been catching up with Gentleman Jack during dinner over the last couple of days. Two episodes in so far and this is really good. BBC quality paired with a very unusual story. I'm curious to see what follows.

Also saw the new Spiderman. It was quite good. Usually not a fan of the character, nor of the MCU in general but this was a more than solid effort. Loved Jake Gyllenhaal as well. He's great as always. 

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6 hours ago, Veltigar said:

Been catching up with Gentleman Jack during dinner over the last couple of days. Two episodes in so far and this is really good. BBC quality paired with a very unusual story. I'm curious to see what follows.

 

Gentleman Jack was terrific -- Sally Wainwright strikes again.

 

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Just saw Unforgiven for the first time... I should have seen this way before. What a film, I get why Clint never made another Western after this. It's well-acted throughout, but the main selling point is the script. Now this is a film which incredibly intelligent writing. They really stripped the pretty façade from the Western genre and really made what I feel is one of the most realistic depictions of the effects of on-screen violence ever. This is as classy as Sam Peckinpah's best work.

 

59 minutes ago, Zorral said:

Gentleman Jack was terrific -- Sally Wainwright strikes again.

 

I'm curious how it will proceed. 

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1 hour ago, Veltigar said:

I'm curious how it will proceed. 

Presumably: we'll get a lot more about the trials and tribulations of opening the new mine, which will include the ongoing threat and obstacle of that banker who maimed the boy with his yellow coach, and equally important, will Lister be able to redeem Shibden's mortgage; more about the murder of the alcoholic evil father; more travel; familial drama with the families of both Ann and Anne -- probably the aunt will die -- and gossip of the neighborhood.  Loads of material! But the coal mine should probably be center to it all, due to, you know, that most necessary thing, 'the necessary' as they called it back then, money.

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1 hour ago, Zorral said:

/

In season 1 I mean :p I'm only at the second episode :p 

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On 7/8/2019 at 1:37 PM, Zorral said:

Fortunately, a Turkish American woman from whom I bought a thumb ring / bow string guard some time back, informed me that the second season of The Magnificent Century is entirely available on Youtube with English subtitles. I desired seasons 2 and 3, but netflix, which had started Ottoman history delving, with season one of the MC, and Ertugrul, just -- did not. The Magnificent Century is the fictionalized adventure-biography story of Süleyman the Magnificent, which, particularly in season 1, centers the political rivalries and manueverings of the harem.  Central to that is the formerly Christian slave kidnapped, maybe from Anatolia or elsewhere, who eventually marries the Emperor, even though it had long been the custom of the Ottoman rulers to not marry, merely father as many children as possible.

The fabrics and textiles and jewels and horses and palaces and intrigue are indeed magnificent. And since encountering season 1 I've learned so much history to all this that I didn't have then, it's all so much more fun. I know that Süleyman did indeed poke the Spanish-Hapsburg Emperor to release France's King Francois from prison in Spain.  I know how closely allied already in the 16th century were the French crown and the Ottoman empire.

Coming right up: The Battle of Mohacs (1526) and the end of Hungary's Louis II, and the partition of it between the Ottomans, the Hapsburgs and -- the Principality of Transylvania -- for centuries. 

Again, I wouldn't have known just how significant this was if I hadn't earlier in this year or last year or sometime learned how frackin' wealthy Hungary was in the middle ages, due to their gold and silver mines -- providing most of the gold and silver to Europe and even the middle east during those centuries. So when Süleyman  has all the classic sculpture at Louis II's palace in Buda shipped back to Istanbul, and wagon train upon wagon train of gold and silver everything else too, I Got It. Which is why I guess, all these reasons, the Battle of Mohacs is called the end of the middle ages for Hungary. It never again regained the place on the European - Middle Eastern historical stage it held since about the 12th century. 

(However, a subplot has shown up, which is entirely fictional, not at all historical. A Castillan Infanta, engaged to a son of the Hapsburgs, has been captured by Ottoman pirates. This never happened. But we get to see Venice manuevering here ....) 

This is exactly what somebody who is suffering -- and I do mean suffering! -- from a nasty summer cold should have.
 

As curiosity, does the show tell you where those gold and silver mines are? Because afaik, modern day Hungary, being mostly a plain, wouldn't have that, but there were, and still are mines in the Carpathians in Transylvania. Even the Romans mined the area until they abandoned Dacia.

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Posted (edited)

No, no, no.  This isn't in the series, anything about the mines. It's just that I know this was the case, as Europe's principle precious mental supply, until it was Spain, with its mines in Mexico and Latin America.

This is the Kingdom of Hungary in the medieval era, very significant in Europe in the medieval era.  And yes, Transylvania was part of the Kingdom, which after Mohacs, Suleiman gave to a sublord from the region, and then reneged on the deal.  That's in the middle of the 16th century and post Hungary's greatness on the stage of European power plays, thanks no little to Lutheranism and Spain and her New World gold supplies. Also The Turk was probably the most powerful military and administrative power in the 16th century in the middle east, Eastern Europe, up all around the Black Sea, into much that was Russia, and certainly even in Europe due to its alliance with France (thus, the magnificent century), while back in the 13 and 14th centuries -- not so.

The best account of the mines and this subject, though it isn't the subject of the book, is Joanna: The Notorious Queen of Naples, Jerusalem and Sicily (2011) by Nancy Goldstone. It includes the citations, so you can learn more detailed information. The Kingdom of Hungary insisted that Naples legitimately belonged to him and his family, due to various marriages and offspring.  It was very complicated -- the era of the Avignon popes and so on.  Petrarch was a most valued member of Joanna's court -- Naples was the most civilized court in Europe then.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2011/apr/09/joanna-notorious-nancy-goldstone-review

There's a section in this wiki that deals with the region and mines -- plug 'mines' into the search function of your browser.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingdom_of_Hungary

There's this online resource also:

https://brill.com/view/book/edcoll/9789004363908/BP000019.xml

Edited by Zorral

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It dawned on me this weekend that while I've always known the ending, I've never actually seen the movie. So I ended up watching one of the best movies I've ever seen, The Usual Suspects. 

Amazing! 

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I tried a rewatch of Mad Men S1 during my flights yesterday.  It did not hold up well.  Without the curiosity/intrigue of how the characters would develop, it’s just plodding and clunky.  Disappointing.  Somethings don’t do well on rewatch. 

I’m saving Stranger Things S3 for my really long flight next week. 

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8 hours ago, Veltigar said:

Just saw Unforgiven for the first time... I should have seen this way before. What a film, I get why Clint never made another Western after this. It's well-acted throughout, but the main selling point is the script. Now this is a film which incredibly intelligent writing. They really stripped the pretty façade from the Western genre and really made what I feel is one of the most realistic depictions of the effects of on-screen violence ever. This is as classy as Sam Peckinpah's best work.

Masterpiece. Love this quote so much:

Its a hell of a thing, killing a man. You take away everything he's got and everything he's ever gonna have.

3 hours ago, Tywin et al. said:

It dawned on me this weekend that while I've always known the ending, I've never actually seen the movie. So I ended up watching one of the best movies I've ever seen, The Usual Suspects. 

Amazing! 

Masterpiece. Love this quote so much:

He'll flip ya, flip you for real! :lol:

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8 hours ago, Tywin et al. said:

It dawned on me this weekend that while I've always known the ending, I've never actually seen the movie. So I ended up watching one of the best movies I've ever seen, The Usual Suspects. 

Amazing! 

One of those films that if I stumble across it - I generally end up watching all of it.

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