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1 hour ago, Chataya de Fleury said:

In the accounting and finance world, resume templates have not changed significantly.

Not sure about what field you are in. Take a look at some resumes that have been submitted to your department, if you can. 

Avoid: the “objective” field that was trendy in the 90s and early 2000s, and definitely avoid the “hobbies and activities” field that many millennials and Gen-z’s are using. I look at those and am like “I do not give a f—- what your hobbies are.”

Humblebrag on your charity work instead.

Put a succinct summary at the top of your three strongest capabilities.  Don’t assume those will be accurately inferred from listing all of your past job titles, where importance-inflation has devalued all meaning. 

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45 minutes ago, Iskaral Pust said:

Humblebrag on your charity work instead.

Put a succinct summary at the top of your three strongest capabilities.  Don’t assume those will be accurately inferred from listing all of your past job titles, where importance-inflation has devalued all meaning. 

Right - Volunteer work or Volunteer activities (either heading) is great. I don’t have this because I do have a 2.5-page resume, even though I only use the last 10 years of experience.

I personally love the idea of a top three strongest capabilities at the top. I’m definitely going to use that in the future. I’ll be able to specifically relate each capability to a point on my resume.

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I’ve got a LinkedIn question that y’all might be able to help me with -

Does anyone else have the problem of recruiters contacting you for roles that are way too junior? Is it something in my profile that is causing this, or is this because recruiters are just trying to cast a wide net?

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1 hour ago, Chataya de Fleury said:

I’ve got a LinkedIn question that y’all might be able to help me with -

Does anyone else have the problem of recruiters contacting you for roles that are way too junior? Is it something in my profile that is causing this, or is this because recruiters are just trying to cast a wide net?

This. 

When I worked in semiconductor manufacturing recruiters would constantly reach out to me about equipment engineering jobs though my profile contained zero mention of or experience. It was the word technician (process engineering) that always landed me in their searches. And it was always a 'if you are interested or know someone who might be' as a way to farm out their job.

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Agreed with @kairparavel, they use inclusive search terms to get as many eyeballs as possible.  
I have a stint as a Chief Investment Officer on my Linked-In, and somewhere in the text it’s abbreviated as CIO.  And I routinely get job offers and sales pitches to a Chief Information Officer instead.  And sometimes I still get offers for run-of-the-mill actuarial jobs.

I’m sure your profile is fine for anyone who should be able to recognize what it represents.

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1 hour ago, Iskaral Pust said:

I rarely even drink caffeine, and my alcohol consumption has been almost nil for nearly 20 years.  I’m practically Mormon, but without the dippy beliefs or multiple wives.  I swear a lot more than a Mormon though, especially when driving.  What denomination would that be?  Lutheran?  I can try swearing in a southern accent if that increases the options.

And Iskaral casts a wide net over which thread to which he is responding :rofl:

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On 3/11/2021 at 6:59 PM, Chataya de Fleury said:

I’ve got a LinkedIn question that y’all might be able to help me with -

Does anyone else have the problem of recruiters contacting you for roles that are way too junior? Is it something in my profile that is causing this, or is this because recruiters are just trying to cast a wide net?

Bit late but anyway... I think they just get triggered by the key words in the resume. I get a lot of offers for roles that I did decades ago which doesn't reflect at all what I'm doing now. Should try and put my elementary school experience in and see what I get from that.

But one question about recruiter etiquette. I get a flood of good job openings right now and while I have no intention of changing jobs (or rather not allowed to), I sometimes bite but ask for a very high enumeration. Nothing unreasonable but this usually stops the process. I do that to keep my interview skills honed and because everything is done remote these days, it doesn't waste too much time.  But I wonder if that is not burning bridges for later when I might need to move on after all. Seems not to be a problem with, for example, AWS. They keep contacting me for different roles. But their pay is lousy anyway.

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i am suffering from burnout at my current gig. i feel bad for it. with this whole pandemic thing and everything that has happened i should just be happy to be employed, but i am not.

while i have learned some interesting techniques and get to work with some stellar products the food often just comes across as too salty and too rich in an attempt to be luxurious. dishes are conceived for appearance and other factors take a backseat. some items take longer to put on the plate than they do to cook. overall i find the food soulless. i have little influence on the menu at all.

but, boy do i get to work! 12 and 14 hour days are the norm again. i do all the butchery, do all organizing,  ordering and other tasks to keep the place running. during service i work a station. my output to return is not good right now.

the owner is a talented chef, but has other projects and cannot focus his attention on this restaurant so he and i discussed him hiring a true chef du cuisine to push the food forward.

rather than actually search out someone he hired a former sous chef who is spoken of as a joke by other staff. for me that's a regressive move. 

the exec sous i have spoken of in other posts is a non-issue at this point. i work around him and he will take direction from me which is helpful. but he is still ultimately clueless and will come in see me neck deep in prep with a list on the wall and think the best use of his time is to r&d a new dish. 

in addition the place suffers from some culture issues that i cannot possibly fix as they start at the top. 

overall i am getting no satisfaction from my time each day. a craft that i love so much is rendered to just be work. and it is work that doesn't pay quite what it used to. owners and operators have used the pandemic and their lowered revenues to lower pay for staff. as revenues return to pre-pandemic levels wages will not. capitalism is pretty neat.

yeah, so that's that. 

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For 12-14 hour days, I'd think it'd have to be a pretty good environment to justify it. Sorry to hear it's rough going right now.

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Sorry @MercenaryChef, I didn’t realize that you were so dissatisfied.  I thought you would be still in the honeymoon phase after taking on this new position.  Was that only ~18 months ago?  Time passes strangely during COVID.

If I can paraphrase: you sound like an over-worked COO who’s feeling disconnected from the product, with an absent and distracted CEO who needs to install a head of content (CIO in my world, CTO in tech), but he’s made an underwhelming, underpowered selection for the role.

And working long hours for reduced pay will leave anyone burned out.  Just my opinion, but I don’t think 60+ hours a week is sustainable in the long term in any job that demands creativity and good judgment, not unless that includes a lot of downtime within. You might be able to grind away at repetitive tasks for those long hours, but otherwise we’re kidding ourselves about whether we’re really bringing our best or going through the motions.

So what’s your path forward?  Confront the owner/CEO?  If you’ve absorbed a cut in pay to help keep him solvent, then he owes it to you to help with the non-financial problems like culture and having the right people in the right roles.

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@Iskaral Pust i like way you have spelled all of it out to make it relatable.

the hours areb what the job is. i have always put in long hours as a chef. that is kind of the deal. our industry is a bit broken in that regard. 

he has a larger dream for me as corporate chef of his growing restaurant group but that transition is dependent upon contracts being signed and investors handing over cash. it would be a role that would pay more to my expectations but not a role that actually excites me. it would satisfy my need to bring order and systems to kitchens and to mentor chef teams though. 

that is all cool sounding but i still want to cook. i still want to create and express myself. i still have things i want to share culinary with  guests.

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like a bechamel the plot had thickened. 

the incoming chef du cuisine i wasn't too thrilled about bailed on the position. owner has now taken my advice and is using a recruiter to fill the position properly. 

we had hired a very very good floor manager stealing her away from another michelin star restaurant. she lasted 1 week and quit. she was suffering anxiety issues with the stress of our restaurant. 

a cook quit right before service. he said he just couldn't keep up. i got to work his station plus my own as we simply have no backup.

we debuted 5 new dishes last night that were absolute struggles to get right. 

this weekend one of the other remaining two cooks begins a 6 day vacation. we have very solid bookings. 

only my personal and professional pride keeps me going. i am mentally preparing myself for more 15 hour days of slogging through prep and service.

but, at least i have a job?

 

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Posted (edited)

I love that comparison, “like a bechamel, the plot had thickened.” ....aaaaand that was the last moment of levity, above :( Sorry to hear about all this, @MercenaryChef.

Meanwhile, I celebrated my first night of not working until midnight by....going out after work and staying up until midnight, with three sour apple martinis at my favorite French bistro :P 

And then I had a run in with some neighbors, who saw me placing a violation notice about street parking under their windshield wiper (“all streets are fire lanes. This vehicle is subject to a $100 fine and immediate towing” and “guest parking should be used.”) Of course, we never tow, and we waive the fine on the first documented offense, as I explained. That it was at this point informational and a request to park in guest parking rather than on the street (guest parking literally being 20 feet away). I still got yelled at and called a racist :rolleyes: Which is stupid because I had no idea what skin color was of the person who had parked the car (he was black) and I’ve also given this exact same warning letter to an Asian person and two white people, which hardly bespeaks a pattern of “discrimination”.

And the fire lane thing is really serious. We have had a fire in the neighborhood, before, and a car parked in the street here would block a fire truck. (Four fire trucks showed up to that fire).

So, getting yelled at and being called a racist when I’m just trying to be a good citizen and HOA President ruined my good mood and now I’ll be working until midnight again. Lovely.

Edited by Chataya de Fleury

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Looking for some advice on how to phrase a response to something that was said to me (spoken in a remote meeting AND written in a follow up email) by my HoD. I need to rebutt what was said but I need to get the tone right.

Last week I had a long awaited 1:1 with my HoD covering topics like 'what is my future here/are there opportunities for me to advance' etc. In preparation for the meeting I emailed some notes on what topics I wanted to discuss - we have been working on different teams since April 2020 and haven't met in the flesh since then. One of things I mentioned was that I do most of the training of staff and visitors and could this be acknowledged on my JD and that I would happily take some additional responsibility too. I also said that I had taken the industry standard qualification in training (self funded and in my own time). My HoD said they didn't see this as a role for me, they would rather I focus on X instead - which is fine, it was only a suggestion and I am genuinely not that fussed. HOWEVER, they said they were disappointed that I had not told them I was doing the training qualification. I reiterated that it was in my own time and I paid for it myself. It did not in any way affect my work, nor did I spend any of my work time on it.

I thought that would be the end of it. But we both sent emails afterwards where we clarified what we had agreed in the meeting (and 90% of this is fine, I am totally happy with what we agreed) and AGAIN she has mentioned that she was disappointed that I didn't tell her I was taking a training course (in my own time that I paid for myself!). I was just slightly annoyed about her response in the meeting but I am absolutely fuming that she has doubled down and mentioned it again in the email.

As a registered healthcare professional and a Chartered Scientist I have certain standards I have to hold myself to outside of work - so yes, if I do something stupid that is a breach of guidance on social media use or if I have a gambling or drug habit then yes, those are things outside of work hours which an employer or my regulatory body can berate me for. But studying a course in my own time? Absolutely not. So far as I am concerned this crosses a line and moves into inappropriate communication between manager and employee.

How should I respond to this email?

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@Isis I suppose the first question to ask them is 'why is this an issue for you/the organisation'?

'Mind your own business' is always an option as well though. 

Are you in a union? 

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22 minutes ago, BigFatCoward said:

@Isis I suppose the first question to ask them is 'why is this an issue for you/the organisation'?

'Mind your own business' is always an option as well though. 

Are you in a union? 

Yes, I'm a union rep (specifically H&S). I already decided to contact the workplace rep (i.e. Main union person at work) to discuss it. 

I mean, yeah, I could be rude and say 'mind your own business'. But I'd like to not burn any bridges if possible. 

I was planning to ask for an explanation of why she believes she needed to be informed of something I did in my own time. Because really, it's for her to explain herself here, not me. But I additionally need her to know that what she's said is wholly inappropriate and she's overstepped her role. 

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@Isis

Is there a chance she meant 'I wish we would have had a chance to discuss this first, so we could have reviewed professional training opportunities more suited to our goals for you.' or some such thing. Not that you completed that training, but that you had a desire or expectation that ultimately doesn't align with theirs and something mutually beneficial could have been lined up instead? Of course, she probably should have expressed that, if it's the case. 

 

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2 hours ago, kairparavel said:

@Isis

Is there a chance she meant 'I wish we would have had a chance to discuss this first, so we could have reviewed professional training opportunities more suited to our goals for you.' or some such thing. Not that you completed that training, but that you had a desire or expectation that ultimately doesn't align with theirs and something mutually beneficial could have been lined up instead? Of course, she probably should have expressed that, if it's the case. 

 

This is how I read it too @Isis, but I think your best path here is to ask the HoD why they’re disappointed about this.  Use a non-accusatory tone: “I’m surprised that you are disappointed that I would pursue extra development on my own time and at my own cost.  Can you help me see why?”

Also, do some self-assessment of your feelings here before you go into that conversation.  This sounds like a much bigger deal to you than to the HoD.  It sounds like you have a sense of ownership and of ambition in this area, neither of which are easy to let go.  Do you resent that the HoD did not endorse your ownership and ambition?  Do you feel disrespected because of this?   Does the HoD have a different view of your capabilities/potential than you?  Or a different view of what would be the most valuable contribution to the team? e.g. have you prioritized something that you like but isn’t aligned with HoD’s priorities for the group?  Why did you not share your intention before doing the training?

Make sure you understand the ultimate issue before you start discussing the proximate issue.

To answer your specific question, I don’t think the HoD has over-stepped to express disappointment, unless that manifests as some sort of censure.  Disappointment is just a feeling and everyone is entitled to have them, just not to impose them on others.  I don’t think they could use this as a negative in your performance assessment, but they may view it negatively on how you’re approaching your development plan and how much they want to invest in your development.  That separation of jurisdiction is important.

Best of luck.  

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On 4/8/2021 at 7:06 AM, MercenaryChef said:

like a bechamel the plot had thickened. 

the incoming chef du cuisine i wasn't too thrilled about bailed on the position. owner has now taken my advice and is using a recruiter to fill the position properly. 

we had hired a very very good floor manager stealing her away from another michelin star restaurant. she lasted 1 week and quit. she was suffering anxiety issues with the stress of our restaurant. 

a cook quit right before service. he said he just couldn't keep up. i got to work his station plus my own as we simply have no backup.

we debuted 5 new dishes last night that were absolute struggles to get right. 

this weekend one of the other remaining two cooks begins a 6 day vacation. we have very solid bookings. 

only my personal and professional pride keeps me going. i am mentally preparing myself for more 15 hour days of slogging through prep and service.

but, at least i have a job?

 

If that many people are quitting, and making it more stressful for the stayers to absorb the loss, then it’s time for an intervention with the owner.  Sorry that it has started to spiral.

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