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Simon Steele

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About Simon Steele

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  1. Simon Steele

    U.S. Politics: The Marionette Presidency Edition

    This is great too. This really doesn't seem that hard. What's so fun about yours is how the Oxford Comma debate changes the meaning/tone slightly. It's a fun slogan. Makes me read it again and again.
  2. Simon Steele

    U.S. Politics: The Marionette Presidency Edition

    Wait, wait, there is a much better campaign slogan for the Dems to put out there, and Mitch McConnell, through all his jowls, delivered it a couple of days ago. On Russia: "It really better not happen again in 2018." That is a perfect campaign slogan for so many things. Stupid democrats. They're terrible at this. For the people? That's embarrassing. I can't say that in public places.
  3. I just went back and beat the DLCs, though I've had them on the shelf for a couple of years. DS3 is a lot of fun, and when I go back to DS1 now, I appreciate the fluidity of movement that DS3 offers. The world building and lore aren't the same at all, in my opinion, though, and ultimately, DS1 is the best of the three.
  4. Simon Steele

    U.S. Politics- SCOTUS 2: The Election Strikes Back

    I don't know, this seems justifiable (the video, not the argument you're making). If you walk around on public platforms yelling things at people, you might get knocked out by the dude you're yelling out. The argument you're making isn't even about race, really, it's about dickwads running their mouths in public. Should they be beaten for it? I think the politics forum here would say the racial aspect makes this a feasible way of dealing with someone, but I take your argument and say, yeah, in the context of how the man in the video was behaving? It doesn't matter the kind of hate speech he's yelling. Someone ought to kick his stupid ass. My favorite part in the vid is when the guy takes off his glasses, puts them away, and then beats the dude up.
  5. Simon Steele

    U.S. Politics- SCOTUS 2: The Election Strikes Back

    I'm listening to NPR's 1A News Roundup, and the host is interviewing British journalists. Their opinion is that while Europeans (but primarily white Europeans) have protested American policies and Presidents before, these protests are different. Even when protesting policies of George Bush, the people in Britain never actually seemed to hate Bush, the journalists argued. What we're seeing with Trump is a whole new level. They hate the man, not the action, so to speak. This was an interesting take in my opinion. Whether or not people overseas hated Bush or not (shoes were thrown), this is a new level of hatred toward the executive of the United States.
  6. Simon Steele

    U.S. Politics: Kraving for Kavanaugh

    You know, at this point, more evidence is only a good thing. Even if nothing is/can be done with it.
  7. Simon Steele

    U.S. Politics: Kraving for Kavanaugh

    So this Supreme Court pick is going through no matter what, I am guessing. I am trying to think ahead about the importance of the midterms. Taking the House for Democrats and maybe the Senate seem imperative. A lot of pundits say the Senate is a long shot, but I feel like a half victory in the fall isn't a victory at all. So if the Dems only take the House, what good can they do? This isn't a rhetorical question. What do they start doing? If they take both chambers of Congress, a lot more can happen, but outside of impeachment and blocking later Supreme Court picks, what do you guys see as the big moves they can make? I hope obstruction is not the only plan on the table. I ask because my mind is so wrapped around the nightmare of Kennedy to Kavanaugh that I want to start thinking about how to promote the important, tangible steps (to myself).
  8. Simon Steele

    U. S Politics: I know why the caged babe screams.

    I am too. No (Trump supporters) one saw this coming from the moment whispers of the Nobel Peace prize were bandied about. I mean, that was met with huge laughter in this household, not serious hope. I was listening to one of the NPRs yesterday about an upcoming meeting Trump has with Putin and how, if Trump can't handle Kim, he's going to be completely owned by Putin. Huge disaster in the making.
  9. Simon Steele

    U. S Politics: I know why the caged babe screams.

    Your single example doesn't account for the hundreds of billions circulating through the banks of private individuals.
  10. Simon Steele

    U. S Politics: I know why the caged babe screams.

    Do you have sources for this? Otherwise, your math seems fuzzy. All the money is in the hands of a few, yet if we redistribute it, suddenly there isn't enough to go around (in any meaningful way)?
  11. I got some good games on Summer Sale, but Elite Dangerous and Everspace have been the most fun. I didn't know I liked space sim shooting so much.
  12. Simon Steele

    U. S Politics: I know why the caged babe screams.

    We used to have a saying in the Army that summed this up: FTA.
  13. Simon Steele

    U. S Politics: I know why the caged babe screams.

    So, the issue I see with the linked source that has been explored by researchers is an issue of the experiences of the majority of Americans not aligning with people who are marginalized by race, social class, and mental health. One study was designed around the idea that the sample size had to be drawn by emphasizing marginalized groups over a general population sample. This focused research would show the perceptions of people who are affected negatively by the police without the statistical significance being washed out by the majority of white Americans who have different views. When just changing this demographic for the sample, we see people of color are far less likely to trust the police or record good experiences with them. So, while I think it's true, random people calling the police does not often result in much of anything, this is precisely the issue. White Americans who do not live in poverty typically report no issues with police, and this disconnect between races does allow us to say a problem for people of color and people with mental disabilities are negatively impacted by their encounters with the police. Then we take it one step more and ask, "Why is it marginalized groups report bad experiences?" If we are to accept the results of the first linked PDF, then the results of this study should be accepted too. Some people in America experience little trouble with the police, and some people experience great trouble, and these differences can be traced along lines of race and mental health, sadly.
  14. Simon Steele

    U. S Politics: I know why the caged babe screams.

    Thanks for summarizing my points. I will say, you seem upset, and I only point out that your refutation of the source is flawed. I do not think you will be able to see beyond your own biases, so I suppose this is not useful.
  15. Simon Steele

    U. S Politics: I know why the caged babe screams.

    The citation wasn't irrelevant at all. You play this role of argument instructor, but you break the fundamental rule of "grading" with your values as opposed to the argument laid out before you. The reason "race" wouldn't be involved in a report like this is written in the report's methodology. This is a report that is trying to get a pulse on the general population of the United States. The issue may lie with the sample (did the sample effectively represent the U.S. population?), and I have my questions about that. The report did not list limitations, which could be the difficulty of acquiring a representative sample. But the views people have of police is an important aspect of this argument. The more important question is why do people have such high perceptions of law enforcement despite significant issues stemming from how LO's engagement with the public? Issues could also lie in the well-known problem of participant self-reporting in the social sciences any time a survey is used to collect data. But the report itself is not problematic. It is a good baseline, and has the fundamental pieces of a well designed piece of research. Your job, instead of critiquing everyone, should be to find an equally or better designed piece of evidence and use that to look at intersections in the argument. As it stands, you've not discredited the original argument. I may do this for you later. But you've demonstrated ad hominen as a fallacy that you like to rely on even when you could probably find sources to support your arguments.
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